Girl wins legal case to be cryogenically frozen

O

Oscurito

There is no non toxic method currently known to science to thaw out cells and the tissue they make up without irreparably damaging them.

Again, Im a layman and no expert in any of this, but that is the bottom line.
Oh. I agree with that. The whole thing is unproven hokum. Dealing with ice crystals might be the only part of the process where they've done some research and can put an argument together. And indeed, that might be because it's one area where they've been hit with some criticism which would have threatened their revenue stream.
 


Lumpy Talbot

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 30, 2015
Messages
28,280
Twitter
No
Even if you could technically defrost someone from cryogenesis without destroying them physically, which I very much doubt, they'd probably be insane at best in short order at being reanimated in a world and a society in which they would have no recognition points, no compass and were considered immediately some kind of freak.
 

PeacefulViking

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 20, 2012
Messages
2,469
Poor girl and parents.

It does not seem like a good use of money, but still less of a waste than using it to pay for a funeral or giving it to the church to say mass. (Do Catholics still do that?)

I can't really see the process working. Surely there would be catastrophic brain damage caused by the processes before and during the "freezing", and by decay during the storage presumably storage.

But I can understand people in desperation turning to it. And I don't understand some of the objections. If she did wake up 200 years from now, surely that would be great? By then her cancer can probably be cured and even if she would miss her family, she would surely be able adopt like many other young people have adapted to losing their family.
 

PeacefulViking

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 20, 2012
Messages
2,469
Even if you could technically defrost someone from cryogenesis without destroying them physically, which I very much doubt, they'd probably be insane at best in short order at being reanimated in a world and a society in which they would have no recognition points, no compass and were considered immediately some kind of freak.
I doubt it. Why would you be seen as a freak? You might be famous, or not if many other people were also unfrozen.

And I don't think you would go insane from adapting to society. Would a 18-century person go insane if he time-traveled to our society? I think not.

There have been a few cases of aboriginal people living in basically stone age conditions coming into contact with modern society and despite the challenges that has posed I don't think there is any suggestion they have gone insane. People adapt pretty well to circumstances.
 

The Field Marshal

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 27, 2009
Messages
43,645
Everybody now eats cryogenic chicken.
 

rainmaker

Administrator
Joined
Mar 26, 2012
Messages
22,644
...And I don't think you would go insane from adapting to society. Would a 18-century person go insane if he time-traveled to our society? I think not.

There have been a few cases of aboriginal people living in basically stone age conditions coming into contact with modern society and despite the challenges that has posed I don't think there is any suggestion they have gone insane. People adapt pretty well to circumstances.
in short order at being reanimated in a world and a society in which they would have no recognition points, no compass and were considered immediately some kind of freak.
I think this is actually a more interesting aspect than the physical effects considerations.
 

Nemesiscorporation

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 2, 2011
Messages
13,878
An extraordinary story is emerging from the UK this morning. Reporting of it was under injunction until midnight last night, to the extent that the paper review program on Sky News had to blank out coverage of it when it was displaying previews of several nation dailies.

It relates to a terminally-ill British teenager who wanted her body to be cryogenically frozen in the hope that she could be brought back to life at some point in the future, even if it took centuries. Last month, before her death, she won a historic legal case to have her request granted.

Her divorced parents had become embroiled in a dispute with the father initially opposing her right to be cryogenically preserved. Her mother had supported her wish.

The 14-year-old girl who had a rare form of cancer passed away on October 17th. Her body will be frozen at a specialist facility in the USA.

The Guardian: 14-year-old girl who died of cancer wins right to be cryogenically frozen

The Daily Telegraph gives a fuller and somewhat more critical review of the case:
Girl, 14, who died of cancer cryogenically frozen after telling judge she wanted to be brought back to life "in hundreds of years"
She knew she was incurable and going to die. She took a last chance grasp at possible survival which most likely will not work out. She clearly had the will to live and try to survive. The way I look at it, fair enough and hopefully in the future technology might revive her. Good luck to her.
 

petaljam

Moderator
Joined
Nov 23, 2012
Messages
30,790
She knew she was incurable and going to die. She took a last chance grasp at possible survival which most likely will not work out. She clearly had the will to live and try to survive. The way I look at it, fair enough and hopefully in the future technology might revive her. Good luck to her.
But if something is a scam, then her will to survive just makes it easier for scammers to exploit vulnerable people. There are plenty of con artists targetting people with incurable diseases, and I just don't think it's fair on them for the rest of us to say "fair play to them " - that's being complicit with the people running the scam.
 

Lumpy Talbot

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 30, 2015
Messages
28,280
Twitter
No
I doubt it. Why would you be seen as a freak? You might be famous, or not if many other people were also unfrozen.

And I don't think you would go insane from adapting to society. Would a 18-century person go insane if he time-traveled to our society? I think not.

There have been a few cases of aboriginal people living in basically stone age conditions coming into contact with modern society and despite the challenges that has posed I don't think there is any suggestion they have gone insane. People adapt pretty well to circumstances.
Always been interested in that aspect. I've always wondered how that japanese soldier that emerged from the jungle in south east asia in the 1970s adapted to seeing Tokyo as the modern day city as it was even by then. How would you explain to him that what he was seeing in that neon-lit apparently prosperous nation that at the time was propping up its victor's economy by turning up to buy US government debt with its trade surplus every quarter- had actually been the nation that had surrendered in 1946?

It would be kind of intrusive but I've always been curious to know what the perception of the Amazonian groups only coming into contact with modern civilisation in the last 30 years has been?

I imagine it could be quite shocking. A bit like our first encounter with sentient alien life form might be. And that would be traumatic to say the least.
 

nicenin

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 14, 2007
Messages
1,462
She knew she was incurable and going to die. She took a last chance grasp at possible survival which most likely will not work out. She clearly had the will to live and try to survive. The way I look at it, fair enough and hopefully in the future technology might revive her. Good luck to her.
+1.

A shift towards acceptance of cryonics, even if a scam, is infinitely more ethically sound than the globalist/leftist push for assisted suicide/euthanasia.
 


New Threads

Popular Threads

Most Replies

Top