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Good piece on 'morality' of downloading music




Joined
Mar 11, 2007
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69
Nothing we don't know already there.

Technology made the sale of recorded music possible. Technology made home recording possible. Now technology has made possible the free distribution of recorded music.

And no, it's not like 'stealing a car.' It's like making a perfect copy of somebody else's car, without affecting their car in any way.
 
B

Boggle

These musicians seem to think that writing and singing one song should automatically give them a life of champagne and strippers.
As far as I'm concerned I'll pay for the gigs and if i like their music, I'll pay for an album when it comes down in price.

They can whinge and moan but.... tough. Their self importance is not worth more than my privacy.
 

riker1969

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Feb 11, 2008
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I thought an interesting point was they were warned about the effect of digitalising music(easier to copy) but ignored it as the profits from making you buy a CD copy of a vinyl record you already had were too good to pass up, but long term some arrangement will prob have to be reached as very few artists are broken though the internet and we still need record companies for that.
BTW-many of these CDS you bought in the 80s were not copied from master tapes but just copied from inferior versions.
 

stoichkov

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ten years ago, before downloading took off in earnest as broadband came in, it was not uncommon to go into record shops in this country and see new albums on sale for £25 (pounds, not euro).

i remember paying that for "xtrmntr" by primal scream in tower records in dublin -- a good record, but TWENTY FIVE F*CKING QUID!!!

today, of course, you can buy new albums in those places for little more than ten euro. but it's too late.

the record industry screwed itself with its own staggering greed over the preceding decades. people were absolutely sick of paying through the nose for a cd that might have maybe three good tracks on it. that is why they embraced downloading with such eagerness.

as an aside, i used to have a job which involved occasional dealings with the music business and i have never met a more inept, incompetent shower of twerps in my entire life. they routinely screwed up the simplest of tasks.
 

Cael

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Most of the "music" downloaded is utter garbage. It a consolation if people are not actually wasting money on it.
 
D

Dylan2010

its an interesting area, the question is how far do property rights extend, one line in the sand is at the level of the atom, you have a right to the "atoms" in your legal possession but otherwise no. This would prevent the first caveman from charging a royalty to the second caveman who built a house ;-) after that it becomes arbitrary. In theory Shakespear should still be copyrighted and the underlying holders would have a tradable asset. In general the less protection the better, copyright and IP etc. have become corporate WMDs and wider society pays the price.
 

DeputyEdo

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the record industry screwed itself with its own staggering greed over the preceding decades. people were absolutely sick of paying through the nose for a cd that might have maybe three good tracks on it. that is why they embraced downloading with such eagerness.
totally agree with you here.
And if you wanted, you could have popped up to Norn Iron to get that same 25 quid cd for about 15 quid.
 

Cael

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Cael, do you ever think that everything isn't objective?
Yes, but most "music" today really is corporate toilet backround sound. Its part of that Revolution I was talking about that young people are refusing to pay for it.
 

YoungLiberal

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Yes, but most "music" today really is corporate toilet backround sound. Its part of that Revolution I was talking about that young people are refusing to pay for it.
Not because it's bad music (otherwise, why waste your bandwith), but because it's available free, where it wasn't before. There'd be no refusal to pay, if, for example, there was no internet.

Incidentally, nice to know I'm part of the revolution.
 

Dev__

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Jul 6, 2010
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This is the way I see it,

The Economic Allegory
Imagine if a machine that could copy any physical item came into being. A fictional nano bot army that could reassemble atoms i.e. a carbon copier.

This would have a profound effect on current economics. People would buy the machine and start making every consumer item under the sun including more nano bots. Essentially making current manufacturing processes redundant.

Now stretch this hypothetical to imagine distribution was also made redundant - an equally profound step.

Supply and demand would still exist except we would have to focus on design rather than manufacturing and distribution. People would want new items and they always will, people innately follow fashion trends and demand originality, human labour, talent personalization, new medicines et cetera.

However who supplies these designs? The people themselves as we have always done. It's just they have to get paid for the design before a prototype is made.

The Economic Reality
This is essentially what has happened with the computers and the internet with regard digital media. Distribution and manufacture have been made redundant.

Trying to get people to pay for an item that is in infinite supply is silly. The basic laws of economics dictate that price reflects scarcity and not quality or need. The scarcity in this case is the thought and work put in the design.

Have you ever wondered why diamonds are so expensive and yet water is so cheap? Yet the stark difference of the real need for each commodity could not be greater.

The problem is that the lions share of the revenue in the music and movie industry actually end up in either the hands of the promoters, manufacturers or the distributers and not the artists. Their jobs have been made redundant by technology. We have a word for people who are scared of losing their job from technology - they are called luddites.

What needs to happen is bands have to receive the money before they produce their album then they distribute it for free. Want us to produce another season of 24? We need to raise $30 Million please contribute $5. Want another Arctic Monkeys album? We want $2 Million recommended contribution $10.

tl;dr - the music/movie industry is trying to force old economic realities on to new ones.
 
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stoichkov

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totally agree with you here.
And if you wanted, you could have popped up to Norn Iron to get that same 25 quid cd for about 15 quid.
sadly i don't drive!

then there was the fact that import cds were priced anything between £40 and £60 . . . the whole thing was a joke.

the radiohead "in rainbows" model is the way to go -- stick the whole album up on your website as a set of high-quality bitrate mp3s, and either charge a small flat fee or let people pay what they like.
 

Goldencircle

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Mar 2, 2010
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You've covered the corporate toilet backround sound bit anyway
 

Aindriu

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Most of the "music" downloaded is utter garbage. It a consolation if people are not actually wasting money on it.
I wouldn't call Def Leppard, Deep Purple or AC/DC garbage :rolleyes:
 

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