Great Speeches, your favorite?

Nuada

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I have many but my favorite is maybe Patrick Pearse's Oration at the Graveside of O'Donovan Rossa, which can be found in its entirety here…

http://www.politics.ie/wiki/index.php?t ... ovan_Rossa

but specifically the following couple of lines from the speech…

‘’ Rulers and Defenders of Realms had need to be wary if they would guard against such processes. Life springs from death; and from the graves of patriot men and women spring living nations. The Defenders of this Realm have worked well in secret and in the open. They think that they have pacified Ireland. They think that they have purchased half of us and intimidated the other half. They think that they have foreseen everything, think that they have provided against everything; but the fools, the fools, the fools! - they have left us our Fenian dead, and while Ireland holds these graves, Ireland unfree shall never be at peace.’’
 


Nuada

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Another favorite of mine is the Last Statement of James Connolly (given to daughter Nora Connolly on eve of murder by the British) which can be found in its entirety at…

http://www.wageslave.org/jcs/archive/160509.html


‘’ We believed that the call we then issued to the people of Ireland, was a nobler call, in a holier cause, than any call issued to them during this war, having any connection with the war. We succeeded in proving that Irishmen are ready to die endeavouring to win for Ireland those national rights which the British Government has been asking them to die to win for Belgium. As long as that remains the case, the cause of Irish freedom is safe’’

‘’ Believing that the British Government has no right in Ireland, never had any right in Ireland, and never can have any right in Ireland, the presence, in any one generation of Irishmen, of even a respectable minority, ready to die to affirm that truth, makes that Government for ever a usurpation and a crime against human progress’’
 

michael1965

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Ray McSharry's budget speech of 1987. There is an excerpt from it on this page.

On one hand, it gave a negative but realistic view of the dire economic outlook at that time, but on the other hand, offered hope for the future, and even a glimpse of the celtic tiger, which was only a few years away, but nobody (else) would have dared to predict back then ....
 

gaelach

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http://historical-debates.oireachtas.ie ... 00003.html

From:

In many respects this debate can be regarded as a sort of watershed in Irish politics. It will have a considerable influence on the whole political institutional, democratic future, not just of these Twenty-six counties but of the whole island. We must approach the subject very seriously and bearing that in mind. It is right to ask ourselves now what would be the reaction and the effect of this Bill being defeated this evening. I am not interested in the reaction or the effect so far as contraception is concerned because that is no longer relevant. If the Bill is defeated there are two elements on this island who will rejoice to high heaven. They are the Unionists in Northern Ireland and the extremist Roman Catholics in the Republic.
They are a curious alliance, but they are bound together by the vested interest each of them has in the perpetuation of partition. Neither wishes to know the other. Their wish is to keep this island divided. Most of us here realise that the imposition of partition on this island was a grevious wrong, but its deliberate continuation is equally a grevious wrong. No one who wishes that this island, this race and this nation be united again should try to have that division copper fastened. It does not matter what any of us might like to say to ourselves about what might be the effects of the availability of condoms or anything else, what really matters and what will matter in ten, 20 or 30 years' time is whether the elected representatives of the Irish people decided they wished to underwrite, at least mentally, the concept of partition.

Most of us in the House fervently want to see a 32-county republic on this island.

to
I will conclude by quoting from a letter in The Irish Times of 16 February, signed by Fr. Dominic Johnson OSB, a monk of Glenstal Abbey where he says

With respect to Mr. O'Malley, he might reflect with profit on the life of St. Thomas More, who put his conscience before politics and lost his life for doing so.

The politics of this would be very easy. The politics would be, to be one of the lads, the safest way in Ireland. But I do not believe that the interests of this State, or our Constitution and of this Republic, would be served by putting politics before conscience in regard to this. There is a choice of a kind that can only be answered by saying that I stand by the Republic and accordingly I will not oppose this Bill.

Dessie O' Malley, 1985.
 

gaelach

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It is indeed fortunate that Britain's necessity did not reach the point when Mr. Churchill would have invaded Ireland. All credit to him that he successfully resisted the temptation which, I have not doubt, many times assailed him in his difficulties and to which I freely admit many leaders might have easily succumbed. It is indeed hard for the strong to be just to the weak, but acting justly always has its rewards.
By resisting his temptation in this instance, Mr. Churchill, instead of adding another horrid chapter to the already bloodstained record of the relations between England and this country, has advanced the cause of international morality an important step-one of the most important, indeed, that can be taken on the road to the establishment of any sure basis for peace. . .
Mr. Churchill is proud of Britain's stand alone, after France had fallen and before America entered the War.
Could he not find in his heart the generosity to acknowledge that there is a small nation that stood alone not for one year or two, but for several hundred years against aggression; that endured spoliations, famines, massacres in endless succession; that was clubbed many times into insensibility, but that each time on returning to consciousness took up the fight anew; a small nation that could never be got to accept defeat and has never surrendered her soul?
Mr. Churchill is justly proud of his nation's perseverance against heavy odds. But we in this island are still prouder of our people's perseverance for freedom through all the centuries. We, of our time, have played our part in the perseverance, and we have pledged ourselves to the dead generations who have preserved intact for us this glorious heritage, that we, too, will strive to be faithful to the end, and pass on this tradition unblemished.

Éamon de Valera, 1945.
 

Kf

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Think it has to be Brendan Campbell from Kingscourt.

"I'm not Mr Campbell, I'm Brendan Campbell".
 

Twin Towers

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de Valera to Churchill.

William Wilberforce 18th century slavery abolition speech to the House of Commons.
 

Cogadh

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Robert Emmet's for me:

"I have but one request to ask at my departure from this world, it is the charity of its silence.

Let no man write my epitaph; for as no man who knows my motives dare now vindicate them, let not prejudice or ignorance asperse them.

"Let them and me rest in obscurity and peace; and my tomb remain uninscribed, until other times and other men do justice to my character. When my country takes her place among the nations of earth, then and not till then, let my epitaph be written. I have done".
 

st333ve

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beardyboy

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Can anyone recall the full address by Eoghan Roe before the battle of benburb?

I think it starts "before you is your enemy" goes into how before the irish were let down by poor leaders or poor weapons but now they were their equal, reminds them of the great evils the english waged on Ireland and the irish.

And ends with let the cry be Sancta maria.

later he ordered the charge with the line

"Gentlemen, in a few minutes we shall be there. Pass the word along the line, Sancta Maria; and in the name of Father, Son, and Holy Ghost, charge."

What great men, what pale shadows we be
 

beardyboy

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And one from the enemy - although it is perhaps a famous last words but it has the nobility of spirit

"good-bye boys, I die a true American" William Poole - Leader of the know nothings

If we can all say we die a true Irishman it will be a worthy and noble end
 

Kwame-Nkrumah

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Cantdecide said:
Martin Luther Kings "I have a dream " speech
I actually have a video of MLK's speeches and by far and away his best (in my opinion) was his "I have seen the mountain Top" speech, given shortly before he was killed.

Yes, Connolly's last statement was brilliant. Emmet's speech from the Dock has to be up there too.
 

Podolski

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Tomás Mac Giolla, President of (Official) Sinn Féin (now the Workers' Party) at Carrickmore, Co. Tyrone, July 1972.

"The Provisionals have won publicity because their demands are simple, easily presented and easily understood. The Provisionals want a united Ireland with British troops out. What could be simpler for the correspondent who wants to get the message across to people who, a couple of years ago, didn't know Ireland existed? The South is free, now they want to free the North. The age-old demand of a united Ireland, the glamorous men romantically attached to the gun and the bomb, the young hero in his bandolier giving a last press conference to the international press corps before he marches out to die for his country"

"Again, the Provisionals live up to the image of the sectarian fighter in a religious war. He is the Catholic, who, when he talks about 'his people' means only other Catholics. When he talks about the enemy he means Protestants. He is easily presented to a public which has been told that what is happening in the 6 Counties is a religious war, a primitive and unthinking conflict between tribes, arbitrarily divided and incapable of co-existence. Given this notion, sectarian civil war is not only likely but inevitable - and its threat is going to continue for as long as there are Catholics and Protestants".

"The Provisionals, therefore, are attractive to commentators and audiences that demand simple explanations of cause and effect in a world in which bombing and shooting, gruesome death and terrible injury make news. More than that, they can be presented in newspapers, controlled by press barons and enormous capital investment in property, on television stations controlled by the same men or by the bureaucratic representatives of the establishment, without stirring up any of the emotions or posing any of the questioning and the demands of a united working people seeking their full social, economic and political right - the control of their resources, the use of their labour in their own interest, separation not just from the cloak of imperialism, but from the reality of imperialism, the rotten housing, the lack of jobs, the depression of wages, the takeover and close-down of factories at the whim of management in the name of rationalisation, the development of a wholly secular state in which no capitalist ruler can wear the mask of bigotry to divide his co-religionists among the working class from their class brothers".

"The Provisionals are using weapons which Irish and British Tories know they can deal with, for men cannot go on fighting forever. And when the succeed, as they seem to think they will, in bombing their way to the conference table, they will find the British ruling class today as determined as Lloyd George was in 1921, that the solution to the so-called Irish question will be declared in their interests, whether the result be, as it was then, bloody civil war and sectarian pogroms followed by a partitioned nation, or whether it be, as we now forecast, a federal arrangement which will leave Ireland more closely and permanently tied to Britain then she ever has been".
 


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