Harland and Wolff

Glaucon

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Well the harland and Wolff job losses are nothing to do with Brexit.
As for Brexit some short term pain for long term gain.
Catch yourself on. People (both Unionist and Nationalist) are going to find themselves out of a job as a result of Brexit and the suffering of families up and down the land will be immense. Northern Ireland already has a mental health crisis, putting 45 year old fathers out of work and on to the dole will make a bad situation worse. The entire situation is a ticking time bomb.
 


DJP

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The remaining staff were probably predominately from Unionist backgrounds, which makes it understandable that a Socialist Party member and former LE candidate for them can represent them even though she is from Cabra and not NI.
 

Lumpy Talbot

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The new dockside industry now is the Freeport for financial services. If you go to a suitable promontory over the yards now you may catch sight of a buccaneer and adventurer setting sail upon the wide accountant seas, or a Special Purpose Vehicle having her bottom careened for tax-barnacles.

A brave sight to gladden the heart of the little boy who yearns for the sea. The noble vessels shaking down their sails and bowing before the wind, making an angular way out to the deep green and avoiding the regulatory shoals.

Harland and Wolff should get into building Special Purpose Vehicles.
 

Lumpy Talbot

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No
Seriously though it might not be a bad idea for Belfast to think a bit like Paris and start converting redundant space into feeder-grounds for the new industries. Station F in Paris is an interesting project where a disused railway station has been converted for cheap premises for small tech sector start-up space.
 

death or glory

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Seriously though it might not be a bad idea for Belfast to think a bit like Paris and start converting redundant space into feeder-grounds for the new industries. Station F in Paris is an interesting project where a disused railway station has been converted for cheap premises for small tech sector start-up space.
Thanks for your insight.
Have you never heard tell of the Titanic quarter.
 

silverharp

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Seriously though it might not be a bad idea for Belfast to think a bit like Paris and start converting redundant space into feeder-grounds for the new industries. Station F in Paris is an interesting project where a disused railway station has been converted for cheap premises for small tech sector start-up space.
beflast kind of reminds me of Dublin in the 1980's , not sure it can become an international centre though
 

Lumpy Talbot

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Well, even in hard times, a large piece of industrial land in decline can be turned around. Can even be a spark for the phoenix to rise from the ashes if enough incentive to use the place is put into it.

I'm warding off in a way my rather gloomy thoughts on the likelihood of Harland & Woolff still being a going concern in 20 or 30 years time given the volatility of steel and aluminium markets and so on, so I'd prefer to think of the worst case scenario and suggest a plan out from there.
 

Lumpy Talbot

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Interesting game to play in the head. Suppose you were Minister of Finance for the Island of Ireland. Belfast, for all sorts of reasons requires significant attention from Government. I'd be heavily inclined in view of low property prices, availability of a workforce, lower rates and taxes to position Belfast as a new digital powerhouse with special concessions for companies in the tech sector through a dedicated 'scale-up' assisting system.

Probably over the squawks of protesting Dublin, Cork, Galway but in fairness those cities would understand why the attempt at rebirth and regeneration in Belfast would be a high priority.
 

wombat

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Well, even in hard times, a large piece of industrial land in decline can be turned around. Can even be a spark for the phoenix to rise from the ashes if enough incentive to use the place is put into it.
The Titanic centre gives a view of Belfast's industrial history which started with the linen trade and the spinoff trades which led to a skilled engineering workforce. Shipbuilding led to a huge spinoff industry - rope making, furniture making, engine building etc. As the linen trade declined, the Stormont govt bet on man made fibres as a replacement and it worked for a while but once the Asians moved into the business, it was finished. Harland and Wolf bet on building supertankers to carry M.E. oil around the cape to Europe - it was the reason Gulf Oil built the Whiddy depot which was to be a distribution centre. Unfortunately for these plans, the Egyptians and Israelis made peace and the Suez canal reopened, North sea oil didn't help either. H&W tried diversifying into oil rigs but failed. The skilled workers are now past retirement so an attempt to revive traditional industry would be very difficult.
 

Lumpy Talbot

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Wonder where all these superyachts get built... pity H&W missed that development, it could have been very handy to have H&W involved in the heavy superyachtand luxury yacht business.

When you think of it they always have had a great name for shipbuilding but diversity when steel prices are high and major commissions for large ships are built would have been interesting.

Still could be, I guess?
 


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