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Has Sinn Féin Accepted Partition?


dublincitizen

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I notice in a statement released by Sinn Féin today in reference to Fianna Fáil's record on job creation, they use some interesting language:

“Sinn Féin’s position is that this Government has to go. Forcing it to go, making it hold overdue by-elections and putting forward an alternative budget will be our priorities in this state over the coming months.

Fianna Fáil 'to prioritise job creation' as Adams blasts record in govt | BreakingNews.ie
It seems Sinn Féin now regards the Republic as a different state to the North...
 

Panopticon

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Of course they have accepted partition. This is why the stereotype of a Sinn Féiner includes phrases like "Free State government". They don't agree with partition, that's all.
 

dublincitizen

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I'm not being ignorant, I'm well aware of the GFA, but thanks for the condescending reply.

My point is up to now SF have always made a point of never referring to the Republic and the North as different, always using "Ireland" or "this island", referring to the island as a whole, whether they were talking about Belfast, Dublin or the backend of Fermanagh. Here they are specifically referring to the Republic as a different state to the North, something I haven't seen in a SF statement before. A small thing, but significant nonetheless because it shows Irish Unity really has been dropped off the SF agenda.
 

turdsl

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The important part is, this government has to go, that will satisfy most of us.
 

dublincitizen

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And when it does, it won't be Sinn Féin that replaces them. In fact Sinn Féin won't even increase it's vote at the next election. They've abandoned their Republican values, and they've abandoned the Southern electorate.
 

pujols

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I think you are trying to read too much into this Dublin Citizen.

After all they can hardly force Brian Cowen to hold by-elections in Belfast or have him accept an alternative budget for welfare spending in places like Newry, et al.
 

Sync

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I'm not being ignorant, I'm well aware of the GFA, but thanks for the condescending reply.

My point is up to now SF have always made a point of never referring to the Republic and the North as different, always using "Ireland" or "this island", referring to the island as a whole, whether they were talking about Belfast, Dublin or the backend of Fermanagh. Here they are specifically referring to the Republic as a different state to the North, something I haven't seen in a SF statement before. A small thing, but significant nonetheless because it shows Irish Unity really has been dropped off the SF agenda.
So you're aware that SF publicly backed and campaigned for a piece of legislation that recognised the current situation of 2 states, yet you think it's "significant" because, 12 years later, Gerry Adams refers to 2 states in a speech on jobs. Yeah this needed a thread.
 

merle haggard

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I notice in a statement released by Sinn Féin today in reference to Fianna Fáil's record on job creation, they use some interesting language:



It seems Sinn Féin now regards the Republic as a different state to the North...
they accepted the mitchell principles , the GFA and St Andrews , meaning they have fully and unquestioningly accepted partition without any reservation over ten years ago and repeatedly since . They no longer have any ideological , legal or political basis on which to challenge partitions existence . Theyve accepted that the ownership of Ireland by the people of Ireland ,inalienable and indefeasible national sovereignty are not the rights of the Irish people afterall and that Britian can partition the island , violate our national sovereignty , prevent national democracy from functioning and claim our national territory as its own national territory . A far cry from " no other law" .
 

Ruaidhri

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and on the other hand Martin McGuinness is claiming there will be a United Ireland by 2016. It doesn't matter what happens in the North. As long as NI is part of the United Kingdom the majority of Catholics will want to be part of the Republic and Sinn Fein will have to support the will of the republican community. Same with the DUP.

So Sinn Fein certainly won't accept that NI is a seperate state
 

merle haggard

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Of course they have accepted partition. This is why the stereotype of a Sinn Féiner includes phrases like "Free State government". They don't agree with partition, that's all.
And they dont even have an ideological , legal or political standpoint on which to disagree with it either . Bar that theyd simply prefer it wasnt there . Which isnt really much to go on .
 

merle haggard

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and on the other hand Martin McGuinness is claiming there will be a United Ireland by 2016.
yes but there wont be so hes telling lies as he knows there wont be either . Its just rheotric , not an actual political point . Gerry adams doesnt agree with him and pretty much everyone else on the island thinks its a ridiculous claim to make
It doesn't matter what happens in the North. As long as NI is part of the United Kingdom the majority of Catholics will want to be part of the Republic and Sinn Fein will have to support the will of the republican community.
no , they have to support the GFA and St Andrews and the Mitchell principles . Those agreements state very clearly that the occupied 6 counties are legtimately part of the united kingdom and that nobody else has any territorial claim to them only the united kingdom . And that partition is perfectly democratic , perfectly legtimate . What Sinn Fein did was convince the republican community that accepeting all this wasnt rally accepting this , and in fact theyd pulled a fast one on the brits . When theyd done no such thing and actually accepted it all fully .

So Sinn Fein certainly won't accept that NI is a seperate state
well yes they do , theyre even ministers in it . How do they not ? The people who run the south no longer consider the north to even be part of the Irish nation . How on earth can they sign up to an arrangement like that and not accept its a seperate state ? It patently is .
Republicans always said it was a seperate state that had to be destroyed, they simply refused to accept the legitmacy of either state to begin with . Now they accept the legitimacy of both states as well as the dropping of articles 2&3 and the acceptance of Britains terriorial claim instead , enshrined in the GFA , St Andrews and Mitchell principles .

What they actually try to do is avoid using language which indicates they have accepted what they have actually accepted ,as doing so would only serve to alienate their supporters . That is the actual position of sinn fein .
 

merle haggard

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Danger of bogging down in Semantics.

Adams was talking about the ROI being a different state - from the UK

NI is part of the UK.

Is NI a separate State or part of the UK ?
its a seperate state from the free state and part of the UK . Everyone knows hat . Its just that some dont like to talk about it for fear of the pitfalls involved
 

dublincitizen

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So you're aware that SF publicly backed and campaigned for a piece of legislation that recognised the current situation of 2 states, yet you think it's "significant" because, 12 years later, Gerry Adams refers to 2 states in a speech on jobs. Yeah this needed a thread.
:rolleyes:

Sinn Féin has given up on it's Republican ideology, it has given up on campaigning for a United Ireland, it has given up on the Southern electorate, and they've given up on them, that is my point. The vast majority of us accepted the change to the constitution which removed our claim to the 6 counties, which was done for the sake of peace, thats nothing new. But the vast majority of us still support a United Ireland. But Sinn Féin have proven time and time again that Irish Unity or local issues in the South no longer matter to them, and that 6 county issues are all that matters.

They might come out the largest party in next year's Stormont elections, but they're a dying party in the South, and like the Greens, will be wiped out in the next general election.
 

Cruimh

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:rolleyes:

Sinn Féin has given up on it's Republican ideology, it has given up on campaigning for a United Ireland, it has given up on the Southern electorate, and they've given up on them, that is my point. The vast majority of us accepted the change to the constitution which removed our claim to the 6 counties, which was done for the sake of peace, thats nothing new. But the vast majority of us still support a United Ireland. But Sinn Féin have proven time and time again that Irish Unity or local issues in the South no longer matter to them, and that 6 county issues are all that matters.

They might come out the largest party in next year's Stormont elections, but they're a dying party in the South, and like the Greens, will be wiped out in the next general election.
Looks to me as though the Northern Leadership are trying to raise their profile in the ROI

Adams

McGuinness
 

cogol

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They might come out the largest party in next year's Stormont elections, but they're a dying party in the South, and like the Greens, will be wiped out in the next general election.
What are you basing that on?
 
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