Heavy School Bags

bactrian

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I am sure that there are several threads on this topic , but in a quick search I couldn't find them.
Administrators feel free to merge with the appropriate thread.

I have been watching the Secondary School kids ,including my own, hauling these very heavy school bags , and I was wondering why their school books are not all on computer .To my recollection there was a pilot scheme in a school in Dublin (Ballyfermot I think). Does anyone know anything about that scheme.
 


TradCat

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It is insane without a doubt. The sacks are outrageously heavy and it can't be good for them. With Kindles and iPads it is surely only a matter of time before change comes.
 

Juverna

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There is a pilot scheme for first years in Mount Temple S.S. The students have an e book they access at home which costs €9.00, about a third of the book price. While I was sceptical at first, it is working out very well for my daughter. The history e book has alot of extras such as BBC history clips which brings the subject alive. I think in a few years this will be across all subjects.
 

sking81

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Being honest, theres no reason they should be in EBook format really either. The whole issue with books is that by themselves, their not the best learning format as their not interactive.

I think we should be trying to base our learning delivery system around interactive games as they tend to hold attention (especially of the younger generations) a lot better than books do.

Take foldit for example-its basically a puzzle game, very similar to tetris, where you score by manipulating protien structures. Universities copped on to the potential behind it and now post problems they need solved on the fold it website. Basically their using the brainpower of casual gamers to solve problems their having trouble with.

Solve Puzzles for Science | Foldit

Hell if it came to it we could run an alternative education system online...for a lot cheaper than our current one.
 

nozzferrahhtoo

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RahenyFG

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I remember my school bag in Leaving Cert was ridiculously heavy, many times I had to go to a chiropractor during 6th year over it. I mentioned it on the student council and nothing was done about. As usual with everything in this country and the world, until serious cases become known in large numbers then not a dam bit of attention will be paid to this issue.
 

Interista

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Leaving aside questions of e-books and internet learning, do kids really need to haul all their books to and from school every day? Surely they could leave most of them in a school locker and just take the ones they need for their homework?

But watching kids carry heavy bags slung from one shoulder makes me wince. It's really the worst way, anatomically speaking, to carry any heavy load. At least let them take their books in a rucksack or wheelie case.
 

Bosun Higgs

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I recall, One Mr Cowen promising to solve this heavy schoolbag problem, a long time ago, not sure if it was Haughey's or Reynolds regime. Was Biffo Min for Ed?

His solution? a leaflet on how to carry heavy bags.
Nothing changes.
 

ICallely

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You have to follow the money to see where the problem is.

Who makes money from the school books? Who loses if all the information is digitally available?

School books are profitable for the publishers, the book sellers and the like, and no doubt the publishers spend a lot of time in the company of the officials of the department of education when it comes to designing the books, and the syllabi.

I wouldn't say that there is undue influence to resist the digital change over, mainly because that would leave me open to a charge of libel.

But it is odd that a country that sees itself at the front of the digital changes in the world, still educates it's kids using materials and methods from the 1950's.

And kids in Africa are taught on laptops!

Perhaps Michael Dell should have had lunch in Marlborough St?
 

PenelopeT

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Just coming back to the original heavy bags comment, it should be a big concern. I know many schools that refuse kids to go to their locker between 9am and 3:30pm thus meaning they have to carry ALL their books around with them all day, never mind to and from school.

I'm all for the idea of having folders and handouts and sheets to substitute heavy books and notebooks.
 

fluffykontbiscuits

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Just coming back to the original heavy bags comment, it should be a big concern. I know many schools that refuse kids to go to their locker between 9am and 3:30pm thus meaning they have to carry ALL their books around with them all day, never mind to and from school.

I'm all for the idea of having folders and handouts and sheets to substitute heavy books and notebooks.
Its a bit like manual handling in jobs, there is no set weight in legislation as to what people can lift but it comes down to risk assessment. If schools were employers they would be hit with a rake of claims for not preventing kids gaining back injuries. I would suggest if anyones kids are having problems get the opinion of a family GP and tell the school, if enough people do it they will have to put a policy in place I'd say
 

phenomking

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Leaving aside questions of e-books and internet learning, do kids really need to haul all their books to and from school every day? Surely they could leave most of them in a school locker and just take the ones they need for their homework?

But watching kids carry heavy bags slung from one shoulder makes me wince. It's really the worst way, anatomically speaking, to carry any heavy load. At least let them take their books in a rucksack or wheelie case.
that is the books we need for homework....
 

Rural

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A teacher shouldn't need text books for their pupils to teach, the books should be used for reinforcement during homework. The teacher should be able to teach a class using the whiteboard,talking and giving information, questions and answer sessions making the class engaged, shouting out answers for the teacher and filling their answers in on the whiteboard, the class then takes down notes. Having a class engaged is a good part of the learning experience, we learn by listening, writing, practical & reading. We all have a way that we learn better, when teaching a class of over 20, you need to use them all.

I had a history teacher many years ago, who depended completely on text books, she read out from the book and we underlined, talk about lazy teaching & she was young, when we had a double history class we nearly went berserk. That's when I found out how much I enjoyed crosswords.
 

myksav

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Secondary school should start with a laptop/netbook. Lighter, could contain more information.
There's a few first year students I've seen who are barely bigger than the bag of books they carry.
 

DuineEile

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My son (7) has a school bag that looks like a normal school bag or small rucksack, but it has wheels and a pop up handle that allows him to wheel it along. It's a great solution.

D
 


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