Hollyhell - What's It Like To Work For Apple In Ireland

YouKnowWhatIMeanLike

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It's now quite common for Apple employees to refer to their workplace in Cork as Hollyhell. A former employee liked the situation to a digital chicken factory with long well designed bank of cages. That's since they have removed the cubicle floor design at the facility to introduce a more "transparent workplace". Employees were ordered to remove all personal items from their desk spaces during a visit by Tim Cook to the Apple European HQ in 2015.

Apparently local Apple managers control employees continuously and record minutes, and seconds spent on toilet visits. They have diligently created special codes to record these events in employee observation profiles to ridicule individual employees during all-hands meetings for overusing the "AUX-Code null".

Here is another one. If you arrive late for work, let's say 5 minutes, an automatic "incident" record will be created which over time can change your company health insurance coverage significantly.

Former Apple employee Daniela Kickl has summarized her experience at the Cork facility in "Something is rotten in the state of Apple" and it really reminds the reader to a Gulag like corrective labor camp with a communist overload "The Company" that uses "business needs" as the ultimate guide for employees to follow unquestioned. With managers as camp guards that ruthlessly enforce rules meticulously every step of the way. Guards with MacBook always ready in hand to find another reason to punish you for negligence.

Not a nice place to work for some tis?

http://appleinsider.com/articles/15/06/10/apple-store-employees-complained-directly-to-tim-cook-over-bag-search-policy

http://roadlesstravelled.me/2015/04/06/why-steve-jobs-motivated-me-to-quit-apple/
 


wombat

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As my boss used to tell me when I bitched - there's no lock on the gate.
 

Henry94.

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These are the great jobs we are giving up 13 billion in tax for?
 

HarshBuzz

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The really startling thing is that Apple sounds, well, just like every other large organisation in the world:

It’s an organised boys club where perception is valued over substance and tenure over talent.
 

Spanner Island

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As my boss used to tell me when I bitched - there's no lock on the gate.
True enough... although I really don't get the whole 'Apple' cult thing at all...

Nice enough products but the competition caught up long ago and have bettered Apple in some ways...

For a company as rich as Apple is however... it really should be treating ALL staff well... including those of subcontractors and ensuring they're properly paid and looked after...

Ditto many other western 'brands' which undoubtedly take the p!ss around the world and make obscene profits on the backs of the poor...
 

Spanner Island

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These are the great jobs we are giving up 13 billion in tax for?
FFS... :roll:... will you please clue yourself up a bit before regurgitating sh!te...

Little if any of the €13 billion is owed to Ireland... a fact that has been widely known and accepted for a long time now...
 

wombat

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True enough... although I really don't get the whole 'Apple' cult thing at all...
...
I did 2 interviews to work at Intel, neither time was the role explained in English although the 2nd guy apologised for the Intelese jargon and said they really looked for people with site experience as its so different to anywhere else. Thereafter if an agent suggested Intel, I said no thanks.
 

YouKnowWhatIMeanLike

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As my boss used to tell me when I bitched - there's no lock on the gate.
Apparently there is another more popular exit at Hollyhell now these days, and Apple HR has already created the all-new suicide helpdesk... if you follow Kickl's line of thought here.
 

locke

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Apple has a fairly diverse range of operations in Cork, but it's not uncommon to have strict timekeeping in some parts of any business. For example, in Customer Service, you need to have the right number of people on the phones at any given moment to avoid situations where customers are waiting 10+ minutes to get through (clearly Bank of Ireland does not plan this well).

One thing I have noticed in companies where I've worked (and Apple is not among them) is that managers who have come through from that direct operations background is that they don't know how to switch off from that mindset when working in more strategic, project-focused roles.
 

duine n

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As my boss used to tell me when I bitched - there's no lock on the gate.
As two people, probably neither of which was your boss, used to tell me when I bitched: Man is born free and yet everywhere is in chains..........and...... you have nothing to lose except your chains!
 

Man or Mouse

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Apple has a fairly diverse range of operations in Cork, but it's not uncommon to have strict timekeeping in some parts of any business. For example, in Customer Service, you need to have the right number of people on the phones at any given moment to avoid situations where customers are waiting 10+ minutes to get through (clearly Bank of Ireland does not plan this well).

One thing I have noticed in companies where I've worked (and Apple is not among them) is that managers who have come through from that direct operations background is that they don't know how to switch off from that mindset when working in more strategic, project-focused roles.
Only in Ireland is arriving 5 minutes late for work considered an acceptable norm.
 

HarshBuzz

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One thing I have noticed in companies where I've worked (and Apple is not among them) is that managers who have come through from that direct operations background is that they don't know how to switch off from that mindset when working in more strategic, project-focused roles.
that's very true

people from an Ops background get a little bit panicked when they don't have a daily checklist to tick off
 

ShinnerBot No.32564844524

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As my boss used to tell me when I bitched - there's no lock on the gate.
Two competing elements to this however, in a healthy employment market, Apple would lose their staff on the basis of there being better jobs available in other companies...but that doesn't seem to be happening so we don't exactly have those conditions.

And the second question is why we as a society should stand idly by as our quality of employment is dragged down to that of a third world backwater.

Right wingers should understand this as well as anyone else. Indeed the gates not locked, just you'll have to find another way to finance the family and the mortgage, and if that's not available, then failure in governance shouldn't be seen as acceptable. I would have thought that in this era of right wing populism the center right would have learned it's lessons in avoiding the race to the bottom...guess not. :roll:
 

Hunter-Gatherer

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oh bullying and the workplace is a hell. So tell us something we didn't know.

and in other news, IT is not all its cracked up to be.
 

Spanner Island

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Two competing elements to this however, in a healthy employment market, Apple would lose their staff on the basis of there being better jobs available in other companies...but that doesn't seem to be happening so we don't exactly have those conditions.

And the second question is why we as a society should stand idly by as our quality of employment is dragged down to that of a third world backwater.
Eh... I think that's over-egging the negativity tbh...

There are sh!t jobs in all industries. Did one myself many moons ago... call centre... wretched stuff...

For the most part though... the MNCs provide decent enough jobs in decent enough work places...

Ireland isn't some big global economic power house with masses of natural resources either... so we're not exactly in a position to be demanding unrealistic pay and conditions etc...

In the globalised world we're in now if we don't remain competitive the choice is likely to be no work or emigrate...

Right wingers should understand this as well as anyone else. Indeed the gates not locked, just you'll have to find another way to finance the family and the mortgage, and if that's not available, then failure in governance shouldn't be seen as acceptable. I would have thought that in this era of right wing populism the center right would have learned it's lessons in avoiding the race to the bottom...guess not. :roll:
Unfortunately Ireland is more like a small fishing boat in the global economic ocean as opposed to being a huge tanker...

We have to roll with the punches as a result even if doing so isn't particularly palatable at times...
 

ShinnerBot No.32564844524

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Eh... I think that's over-egging the negativity tbh...

There are sh!t jobs in all industries. Did one myself many moons ago... call centre... wretched stuff...

For the most part though... the MNCs provide decent enough jobs in decent enough work places...

Ireland isn't some big global economic power house with masses of natural resources either... so we're not exactly in a position to be demanding unrealistic pay and conditions etc...

In the globalised world we're in now if we don't remain competitive the choice is likely to be no work or emigrate...



Unfortunately Ireland is more like a small fishing boat in the global economic ocean as opposed to being a huge tanker...

We have to roll with the punches as a result even if doing so isn't particularly palatable at times...
Which then takes momentum of it's own internationally leading to ever decreasing standards of living and the rise of right-wing populism as has been so ably demonstrated in recent events.

Can you alter your position towards something more constructive, or do we see the world falter for prevailing neo-liberal dogma? Ireland's competitive advantage has to be built on the attractiveness of its employment conditions in the same global market as with other factors such as cost and productivity, so do we innovate or do we just follow everyone else down the path that brought us the global financial crisis in the first place?
 

HarshBuzz

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Two competing elements to this however, in a healthy employment market, Apple would lose their staff on the basis of there being better jobs available in other companies...but that doesn't seem to be happening so we don't exactly have those conditions.
or maybe, just maybe, a disgruntled ex-employee may not have the most objective view of the situation?

And the second question is why we as a society should stand idly by as our quality of employment is dragged down to that of a third world backwater.
you should take a trip to a third world backwater to find out why comparing a country with one of the highest minimum wages in the world and a first world standard of living with real, abject poverty is not just crass but also displays a total lack of any awareness

Right wingers should understand this as well as anyone else. Indeed the gates not locked, just you'll have to find another way to finance the family and the mortgage, and if that's not available, then failure in governance shouldn't be seen as acceptable. I would have thought that in this era of right wing populism the center right would have learned it's lessons in avoiding the race to the bottom...guess not. :roll:
yep, we should try and be more like those myriad left-wing success stories like......er, um, er :)
 


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