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Home ownership restricts mobility,raises unemployment


Mad as Fish

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See Challenge to Dogma on Owning a Home - Yahoo! Finance

The completion of the motorway network should partly offset the immobility of home owners in Ireland,increasing the commuting distance for jobs. A Tipperary man told me years ago he was planning to commute from Tipp to a job in a west Dublin exurb.
I had a quick skim through the article and I didn't see any talk of other factors causing people to stay put.

I should imagine that homeowners are more likely to have children in school who's education they are unwilling to disturb or that companies that were once young and innovative were successful and so their workers felt more secure and were more likely to buy a house. As the companies matured they may have lost out to the competition and so on.

All in all it strikes me as one of those areas where there are no simple answers and one can draw whatever conclusions suits ones politics.
 

niall78

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As does having children, hobbies, being part of a community, having parents or siblings, etc.

Maybe we should destroy everything that makes life worthwhile to help increase "labour mobility"?
 

Magror14

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It makes a point that is instinctively right. If you are welded into a house you are less likely to travel to look for a job. On the other hand is society served when families kids and all are uprooted from their schools and social networks in the constant search for insecure employment? Looks more like slavery to me.
 

Mushroom

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As does having children, hobbies, being part of a community, having parents or siblings, etc.

Maybe we should destroy everything that makes life worthwhile to help increase "labour mobility"?
It's an interesting dilemma, right enough. Stripping away the external, quality of life issues, it essentially boils down to whether one should go to where the work is, or sit on one's arse at home and wait for a job to come dropping into one's lap.
 

wexfordman

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It's not a dilemma at all, no more than then fact that having a social life, or even having a family interferes with work. We are not put in this earth to generate wealth for others, when you are 6 foot under the fact that you were a good employee matters fncks all.
 

Analyzer

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.....waiting for somebody from Dublin media to declare that this is not true, and that we need another housing bubble, and that the more debt that the citizen accumulates the happier everybody will be....


of course....just like the last time....the message will be more subtle than that.

You will all be too busy trying to be "with it" that you will not even notice the scale of the millstone around your necks.
 
Last edited:

Franzoni

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It's not a dilemma at all, no more than then fact that having a social life, or even having a family interferes with work. We are not put in this earth to generate wealth for others, when you are 6 foot under the fact that you were a good employee matters fncks all.
A few of my friends...the richest stiffs in the graveyard....worked themselves into early graves worrying about jobs getting finished on time for scumbag employers and listening to abuse for consultants and architects only worried about covering their own arses.....
 

Mad as Fish

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It's an interesting dilemma, right enough. Stripping away the external, quality of life issues, it essentially boils down to whether one should go to where the work is, or sit on one's arse at home and wait for a job to come dropping into one's lap.
That's a rather simplistic take upon it and serves to illustrate exactly what I said about the report serving all prejudices and politics.
 
S

simeongrimes

It makes sense to move to a rental model but that shouldn't be about mobility. It should still be your home and you should be reluctant to leave it because it's done up the way you like it and above all you should have accumulated rights based on your tenure.

A rental model based on our current zero rights set up won't work. It's the reason people buy in the first place. This live out of a suitcase work until you're 70 crap is going to turn people to radical alternatives.
 

Mushroom

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A rental model based on our current zero rights set up won't work. It's the reason people buy in the first place. This live out of a suitcase work until you're 70 crap is going to turn people to radical alternatives.
Here's a popular radical alternative for you: sitting on one's arse at home whining about there being no jobs available while sucking from the Social Welfare teat.

Small wonder that so many Irish employers tend to prefer to employ Eastern European or Asian employees, rather than their Irish counterparts.

[Signed: frustrated father of 2 third level graduates who are about to quit this God-forsaken country and seek gainful employment abroad.]
 

Dame_Enda

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My problem with the concept of renting property is the risk of an overbearing nag of a landlord barging in on me every 5 minutes.
 

gatsbygirl20

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As does having children, hobbies, being part of a community, having parents or siblings, etc.

Maybe we should destroy everything that makes life worthwhile to help increase "labour mobility"?
Being ready to move anywhere, endure any discomfort in order to earn whatever race-to-the-bottom pittance is available, may be the lot of workers in the future.

"Driving change", being "flexible", short-term contracts, no-one-owes-you-anything, not-my-problem-suck-it-up,.....the mantras of the modern labour market

Short-termism on every level. Like Willy Loman in Arthur Miller's play about the nightmare underpinning the American Dream..Willy was a man "who felt temporary about himself"......

Permanence, putting down roots, stability, having some ability to plan for the future or for one's old age, quality of life, family, home, community, time to nurture or spend precious hours with a child, caring for an elderly neighbour or parent....

These are uneconomic activities and may have to be ditched
 

beazlebottom

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Here's a popular radical alternative for you: sitting on one's arse at home whining about there being no jobs available while sucking from the Social Welfare teat.

Small wonder that so many Irish employers tend to prefer to employ Eastern European or Asian employees, rather than their Irish counterparts.

[Signed: frustrated father of 2 third level graduates who are about to quit this God-forsaken country and seek gainful employment abroad.]
Sensible kids to flee this corrupt god forsaken kip rather than face a life of paying extortionate taxes, assuming they could get jobs, to keep Drunken Clowen and his cabal of self serving crooks in undeserved pensions and pay for his utterly stupid and corrupt decision to bail out equally corrupt and incompetent Banks. At least abraod they might get a shot at living in a fair and equitable society where rule of law means something.
 

Mushroom

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Being ready to move anywhere, endure any discomfort in order to earn whatever race-to-the-bottom pittance is available, may be the lot of workers in the future.

"Driving change", being "flexible", short-term contracts, no-one-owes-you-anything, not-my-problem-suck-it-up,.....the mantras of the modern labour market

Short-termism on every level. Like Willy Loman in Arthur Miller's play about the nightmare underpinning the American Dream..He was a man "who felt temporary about himself"......

Permanence, putting down roots, stability, having some ability to plan for the future or for one's old age, quality of life, family, home, community, time to nurture or spend precious hours with a child, caring for an elderly neighbour or parent....

These are uneconomic activities and may have to be ditched
Quite correct.

The West has been living in a bubble for far too long - I'd guess about 50 years (I'm a child of the 60's) - but now the bills are beginning to roll in and reality is beginning to bite.
 

Mushroom

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Sensible kids to flee this corrupt god forsaken kip rather than face a life of paying extortionate taxes, assuming they could get jobs, to keep Drunken Clowen and his cabal of self serving crooks in undeserved pensions and pay for his utterly stupid and corrupt decision to bail out equally corrupt and incompetent Banks. At least abraod they might get a shot at living in a fair and equitable society where rule of law means something.
Exactly what I've been telling them.

But who will remain behind to pay my pension ..... and clean my ass when I become doubly incontinent? Maybe I should look into recruiting a mail order bride from Thailand.
 

feargach

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My understanding is that the right wing pushed mortgage indebtedness on various populations in the post WW2 period as a means of making employees more compliant and less likely to go on strike.

An employee who rents a house usually knows that his landlord is unlikely to evict him unless he goes a very long time without paying rent, meaning he can strike for quite a long time before facing a serious consequence. But a person who has indebted himself seriously and faces absolute ruin if his gaff is repossessed becomes a very quiet, very obedient little brown-noser.
 

feargach

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Quite correct.

The West has been living in a bubble for far too long - I'd guess about 50 years (I'm a child of the 60's) - but now the bills are beginning to roll in and reality is beginning to bite.
Employment rights are actually a lot more secure in many parts of the non-West than you may think. Just because China takes a fascist line doesn't mean everyone else does.
 

feargach

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Here's a popular radical alternative for you: sitting on one's arse at home whining about there being no jobs available while sucking from the Social Welfare teat.
Just to start work, you need to pay for so much EU-mandated red tape and make massive payments to Troika-mandated state bodies that you've already spent double the wages of a 2 Bulgarian workers.

The whining is actually legitimate sometimes.
 
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