Homeless families in Ireland: some data

statsman

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Focus Ireland publish some very interesting reports into the developing homelessness crisis, among which are their regular Insights into Family Homelessness Surveys.

The most recent report available on their website is for families that became homeless in March 2017 (advisory: it’s a PDF): https://www.focusireland.ie/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/Insights-into-Family-Homelessness-No-10-Families-who-Presented-as-Homeless-during-March-2017-FINAL.pdf

Here are the key points:

The survey covers 38 of the 77 families to become homeless that month.

  • 32% of the respondents were aged between 18 and 25 years.
  • 21% were 26 to 35 years.
  • 47 % were over the age of 36 years.
That last figure is very interesting, as I think most people would expect the problem to affect young parents mainly.

  • 74% were born in Ireland.
  • 5% were born in the rest of the EU.
  • 21% were outside the EU.
Compare this with 2016, when the annual figure was 54% Irish, 46% migrant.

  • 60% were one-parent families (mostly lone mothers)
  • 40% had both parents present.
  • 16% became homeless because of a relationship breaking up.
  • 74% were unemployed.
  • 66% (25 families) had been living in the private rental sector
  • 14 of these families became homeless because their private rental was taken of the market.
  • 11 of those were taken off the market because the landlord was selling up.

So, there really isn’t a single easy way to tackle this, but some clear trends do seem to be emerging.
  1. We need to address the twin problems of young parents with no history of independent living and of older parents who have lived for a prolonged period in private rentals. For the former group, are there incentives that could be put in place to encourage them to stay with their parents longer?
  2. Find ways of keeping properties in the rental market when the landlord decides to get out of the business. Maybe this is one area where CPOs might actually be part of the solution?
  3. Support parents, especially young parents, to find work. This is going to be a mix of training, education, childcare and other supports.
Thoughts?
 


Spanner Island

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Feb 22, 2011
Messages
23,973
Focus Ireland publish some very interesting reports into the developing homelessness crisis, among which are their regular Insights into Family Homelessness Surveys.

The most recent report available on their website is for families that became homeless in March 2017 (advisory: it’s a PDF): https://www.focusireland.ie/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/Insights-into-Family-Homelessness-No-10-Families-who-Presented-as-Homeless-during-March-2017-FINAL.pdf

Here are the key points:

The survey covers 38 of the 77 families to become homeless that month.

  • 32% of the respondents were aged between 18 and 25 years.
  • 21% were 26 to 35 years.
  • 47 % were over the age of 36 years.
That last figure is very interesting, as I think most people would expect the problem to affect young parents mainly.

  • 74% were born in Ireland.
  • 5% were born in the rest of the EU.
  • 21% were outside the EU.
Compare this with 2016, when the annual figure was 54% Irish, 46% migrant.

  • 60% were one-parent families (mostly lone mothers)
  • 40% had both parents present.
  • 16% became homeless because of a relationship breaking up.
  • 74% were unemployed.
  • 66% (25 families) had been living in the private rental sector
  • 14 of these families became homeless because their private rental was taken of the market.
  • 11 of those were taken off the market because the landlord was selling up.

So, there really isn’t a single easy way to tackle this, but some clear trends do seem to be emerging.
  1. We need to address the twin problems of young parents with no history of independent living and of older parents who have lived for a prolonged period in private rentals. For the former group, are there incentives that could be put in place to encourage them to stay with their parents longer?
  2. Find ways of keeping properties in the rental market when the landlord decides to get out of the business. Maybe this is one area where CPOs might actually be part of the solution?
  3. Support parents, especially young parents, to find work. This is going to be a mix of training, education, childcare and other supports.
Thoughts?
The rental market is a shambles and a complete rip off... and that 66% figure in particular is a disgrace.

It's got to be tackled seriously... rent control with proper protections for long term renters.

It's scandalous that we're back in such a mess regarding property.

There is so much the Govt could do but for whatever reasons... they don't do...

Land hoarding needs to be tackled too...

If any landowner applies for rezoning or planning permission twice on the same bit of land and doesn't develop... the state should legislate to purchase such lands via CPOs at agricultural rates and develop it ourselves...

There is now also huge pressure building to provide the kind of horrendous massive public housing projects that were built back in the 1970s and 1980s...

This pressure should be resisted and instead the 10%, 20% or whatever social housing provision in every development should be delivered with all loopholes that enable developers to buy their way out of such requirements being closed etc.
 

Disillusioned democrat

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Joined
Mar 16, 2010
Messages
15,873
Focus Ireland publish some very interesting reports into the developing homelessness crisis, among which are their regular Insights into Family Homelessness Surveys.

The most recent report available on their website is for families that became homeless in March 2017 (advisory: it’s a PDF): https://www.focusireland.ie/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/Insights-into-Family-Homelessness-No-10-Families-who-Presented-as-Homeless-during-March-2017-FINAL.pdf

Here are the key points:

The survey covers 38 of the 77 families to become homeless that month.

  • 32% of the respondents were aged between 18 and 25 years.
  • 21% were 26 to 35 years.
  • 47 % were over the age of 36 years.
That last figure is very interesting, as I think most people would expect the problem to affect young parents mainly.

  • 74% were born in Ireland.
  • 5% were born in the rest of the EU.
  • 21% were outside the EU.
Compare this with 2016, when the annual figure was 54% Irish, 46% migrant.

  • 60% were one-parent families (mostly lone mothers)
  • 40% had both parents present.
  • 16% became homeless because of a relationship breaking up.
  • 74% were unemployed.
  • 66% (25 families) had been living in the private rental sector
  • 14 of these families became homeless because their private rental was taken of the market.
  • 11 of those were taken off the market because the landlord was selling up.

So, there really isn’t a single easy way to tackle this, but some clear trends do seem to be emerging.
  1. We need to address the twin problems of young parents with no history of independent living and of older parents who have lived for a prolonged period in private rentals. For the former group, are there incentives that could be put in place to encourage them to stay with their parents longer?
  2. Find ways of keeping properties in the rental market when the landlord decides to get out of the business. Maybe this is one area where CPOs might actually be part of the solution?
  3. Support parents, especially young parents, to find work. This is going to be a mix of training, education, childcare and other supports.
Thoughts?
So your 1 and 3 relate to young parents...wouldn't we be better off trying to encourage better planned parenting?

Encouraging parenting only within two parent families, making it necessary to put father's name on the birth cert, enforcing child support requirements from the father, etc?
 
Last edited:

statsman

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So your 1 and 3 relate to young parents...wouldn't we be better off trying to encourage better planned parenting?

Encouraging parenting only withing two parent families, making it necessary to put father's name on the birth cert, enforcing child support requirements from the father, etc?
I don't favour morality police policies; I can see that others might.
 

mr_anderson

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Messages
9,776
We shouldn't be housing anyone from outside the EU.
They are not our responsibility, especially as we cannot house our own citizens.

This is basic common sense.

I'd also question giving free accommodation to 18-25 year olds.
This is setting someone up to be dependent on the state their entire lives.
Seriously dangerous for society.
 

statsman

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Feb 25, 2011
Messages
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The rental market is a shambles and a complete rip off... and that 66% figure in particular is a disgrace.

It's got to be tackled seriously... rent control with proper protections for long term renters.

It's scandalous that we're back in such a mess regarding property.

There is so much the Govt could do but for whatever reasons... they don't do...

Land hoarding needs to be tackled too...

If any landowner applies for rezoning or planning permission twice on the same bit of land and doesn't develop... the state should legislate to purchase such lands via CPOs at agricultural rates and develop it ourselves...

There is now also huge pressure building to provide the kind of horrendous massive public housing projects that were built back in the 1970s and 1980s...

This pressure should be resisted and instead the 10%, 20% or whatever social housing provision in every development should be delivered with all loopholes that enable developers to buy their way out of such requirements being closed etc.
I agree. The last thing we need is another Ballymun, and the private rental sector needs to be tackled seriously, but with both carrots and sticks. I'd really, really like to see 'over the shop' units being renovated and let, but that also means providing proper family amenities in urban centres. Parks, schools, etc; you know what I mean.
 

mr_anderson

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So your 1 and 3 relate to young parents...wouldn't we be better off trying to encourage better planned parenting?

Encouraging parenting only withing two parent families, making it necessary to put father's name on the birth cert, enforcing child support requirements from the father, etc?
Exactly.
The Brookings Institute in America (a left-leaning think tank) came out with 3 ways to practically eliminate poverty.
1. Finish school (not even college, just school)
2. Get a permanent job
3. Don't have kids until you're at least 21 (& preferably married)

https://www.brookings.edu/opinions/three-simple-rules-poor-teens-should-follow-to-join-the-middle-class/


Really basic advice.
 

Spanner Island

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I agree. The last thing we need is another Ballymun, and the private rental sector needs to be tackled seriously, but with both carrots and sticks. I'd really, really like to see 'over the shop' units being renovated and let, but that also means providing proper family amenities in urban centres. Parks, schools, etc; you know what I mean.
High rise apartment living is done the world over as well... but for some reason we can't seem to do it here... or even accept it as an option for some... :roll:

Why is beyond me. Urban sprawl only leads to crap quality of life as people commute for hours every day.

There is no reason why well designed high rise living couldn't be provided imo... for single people, for couples and for families with amenities built into the requirements and which must be built first.

Height limits in our cities should be relaxed with much higher buildings permitted in designated areas... (in dedicated areas in order to cluster as opposed to having high rise dotted all over the place)... the most obvious of which is the Docklands in Dublin east of the Convention centre north and south of the river.
 

Spanner Island

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Exactly.
The Brookings Institute in America (a left-leaning think tank) came out with 3 ways to practically eliminate poverty.
1. Finish school (not even college, just school)
2. Get a permanent job
3. Don't have kids until you're at least 21 (& preferably married)

https://www.brookings.edu/opinions/three-simple-rules-poor-teens-should-follow-to-join-the-middle-class/


Really basic advice.
Is there any such thing as a 'permanent job' anymore?

I have my doubts.
 

mr_anderson

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I agree. The last thing we need is another Ballymun, and the private rental sector needs to be tackled seriously, but with both carrots and sticks. I'd really, really like to see 'over the shop' units being renovated and let, but that also means providing proper family amenities in urban centres. Parks, schools, etc; you know what I mean.

Here again is where the state prevents a solution.
There is usually offices above shops.
You have the crazy situation whereby many of these are vacant (due to a lack of demand).
Owners should have the ability to change the use to residential without planning.
But given government interference, it's not worth their while.

You should be able to flick from office to residential without delay or penalties, allowing you to adjust to market conditions.
 

mr_anderson

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Is there any such thing as a 'permanent job' anymore?

I have my doubts.

Yes.
But how about holding onto a full-time job for two years before having kids.

Edit:
Actually the Brookings Institute said 'full-time'.
I mistakenly said 'permanent'.
 

Spanner Island

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Here again is where the state prevents a solution.
There is usually offices above shops.
You have the crazy situation whereby many of these are vacant (due to a lack of demand).
Owners should have the ability to change the use to residential without planning.
But given government interference, it's not worth their while.

You should be able to flick from office to residential without delay or penalties, allowing you to adjust to market conditions.
As long as there's some sort of system that checks the residential switch to ensure it's been done to a certain standard... no problem with that at all.
 

statsman

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Exactly.
The Brookings Institute in America (a left-leaning think tank) came out with 3 ways to practically eliminate poverty.
1. Finish school (not even college, just school)
2. Get a permanent job
3. Don't have kids until you're at least 21 (& preferably married)

https://www.brookings.edu/opinions/three-simple-rules-poor-teens-should-follow-to-join-the-middle-class/


Really basic advice.
That's very good advice, but in a free society you cannot force people to take it.
 

Civic_critic2

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The amount of talk about housing and its profits, finances and encompassing legislation is truly remarkable. One wonders if those who engage in this tedious sh1te as if it's the most fascinating and important thing in the world might make more money, or some, from applying this degree of time and brain juice to something actually productive.

Even the capital gains from housing are relatively modest compared to any number of other undertakings, such as using your house deposit to set up 20 websites and see some or many give you a return of up to 800% over one year. If you use your brain.

Instead we get a load of old waffle about this bit of legislation needs tweaking or that central bank policy etc etc etc ad nauseam. It's particularly hilarious when accompanied by grand moral statements about telling young people to get the snip to not have kids or the dangers of 'something for nothing' - as if the entire Ahern era wasn't one long free ride on the back of credit for all involved, estate agents, the middle aged, builders, bankers and all the rest. But suddenly we need to guard against the young getting any kind of break; very dangerous.

Do something productive you useless right-wing parasites.
 

statsman

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That is not morality policing; it's simple logic. As Confucius say, "he who dips wick pays for oil"!
Actually, Kung said this:

When the perfect order prevails, the world is like a home shared by all. Leaders are capable and virtuous. Everyone loves and respects their own parents and children as well as the parents and children of others. The old are cared for, adults have jobs, children are nourished and educated. There is a means of support for all those who are disabled or find themselves alone in the world. Everyone has an appropriate role to play in the family and society. Devotion to public duty leaves no place for idleness. Scheming for ill gain is unknown. Sharing displaces selfishness and materialism.
 

mr_anderson

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That's very good advice, but in a free society you cannot force people to take it.

Absolutely, but the government can stop funding those who don't.

There's no way in hell an 18 year old should get free accommodation, whilst those who bust their balls working struggle to afford a roof over their heads.
 

statsman

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Absolutely, but the government can stop funding those who don't.

There's no way in hell an 18 year old should get free accommodation, whilst those who bust their balls working struggle to afford a roof over their heads.
So, what would you do with an 18-year-old mother and her child if her family can't or won't house them? Would you have us not cherish all our children equally?
 
D

Deleted member 48908

Focus Ireland publish some very interesting reports into the developing homelessness crisis, among which are their regular Insights into Family Homelessness Surveys.

The most recent report available on their website is for families that became homeless in March 2017 (advisory: it’s a PDF): https://www.focusireland.ie/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/Insights-into-Family-Homelessness-No-10-Families-who-Presented-as-Homeless-during-March-2017-FINAL.pdf

Here are the key points:

The survey covers 38 of the 77 families to become homeless that month.

  • 32% of the respondents were aged between 18 and 25 years.
  • 21% were 26 to 35 years.
  • 47 % were over the age of 36 years.
That last figure is very interesting, as I think most people would expect the problem to affect young parents mainly.

  • 74% were born in Ireland.
  • 5% were born in the rest of the EU.
  • 21% were outside the EU.
Compare this with 2016, when the annual figure was 54% Irish, 46% migrant.

  • 60% were one-parent families (mostly lone mothers)
  • 40% had both parents present.
  • 16% became homeless because of a relationship breaking up.
  • 74% were unemployed.
  • 66% (25 families) had been living in the private rental sector
  • 14 of these families became homeless because their private rental was taken of the market.
  • 11 of those were taken off the market because the landlord was selling up.

So, there really isn’t a single easy way to tackle this, but some clear trends do seem to be emerging.
  1. We need to address the twin problems of young parents with no history of independent living and of older parents who have lived for a prolonged period in private rentals. For the former group, are there incentives that could be put in place to encourage them to stay with their parents longer?
  2. Find ways of keeping properties in the rental market when the landlord decides to get out of the business. Maybe this is one area where CPOs might actually be part of the solution?
  3. Support parents, especially young parents, to find work. This is going to be a mix of training, education, childcare and other supports.
Thoughts?
I'm with the others who have suggested going vertical. It's how almost every country in the world deals with housing shortages/squeezes.

On your #1...

I'm pretty sure that the homelessness crisis is incentivizing the youngsters back home to live with their parents...where, they'll continue to have no history of independent living.

Facilitating some sort of rent to own scheme might help out with #2. Encouraging the tenants to buy from their landlords could work.

#3 is of course something that we should all be striving towards.
 

pumpkinpie

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26% of those people were from the EU or outside the EU. Exactly what percentage of the homeless total in Ireland are from the EU or outside the EU and why are they not being given a ticket back home? If they aren't Irish we have no obligation to house them. That sounds harsh and it is, but we have an epidemic level of homelessness and there's no point in people arguing that the right to a home should be enshrined in the Constitution if we're housing people who have no business being housed.
 


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