Housing crisis can be fixed overnight but the government refuses to implement the most obvious solution.

hammer

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A new property search engine, Perfect Property, has revealed the budget of the average house hunter in Dublin.

According to the site, the average house hunter in Dublin has a budget of €315,000 for their prospective home.

However, there are some exceptions, with 4pc of Dubliners having a budget of €1m and 1pc having a budget of €5m when it comes to searching for houses, according to research on from the site.

Meanwhile, the site has found that the majority of searches are for houses, with just under three in four consumers searching for houses as opposed to apartments.

And the areas proving to be most popular for property searches include Finglas, Swords, Tallaght and Malahide.

"Our focus at Perfect Property is to work with house hunters and make the journey to their new homes as seamless as possible," Laura Pollard, managing director at Perfect Property, said.

"Our latest insights will help people in search of a new home by showing them at there are various options when considering one of the biggest purchases they’ll ever make."

The research also suggests that just over one in four house hunters are looking for properties with renovation potential.


Independent.ie today
 


HarshBuzz

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hammer

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If house prices had continued to fall after 2013 as the doomsters predicted what affect would that have had on construction sector today ?

Discuss :)
 

Watcher2

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Reading things that aren't there.

We have a problem - everyone accepts that. Solutions can be multi-faceted and can suit all parties.
Indeed they can. But I dont think pushing people out of their homes just because their children have left home is necessarily the answer. I know you are not advocating pushing them out but you are advocating a "lean" type approach where everyone is in a "perfectly sized" dwelling where there is no "wastage" of rooms.

That's not the problem we are experiencing, or even a solution. Its not a dearth of adequately sized properties, just a shortage of properties themselves.
 

hammer

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Indeed they can. But I dont think pushing people out of their homes just because their children have left home is necessarily the answer. I know you are not advocating pushing them out but you are advocating a "lean" type approach where everyone is in a "perfectly sized" dwelling where there is no "wastage" of rooms.

That's not the problem we are experiencing, or even a solution. Its not a dearth of adequately sized properties, just a shortage of properties themselves.
Supposedly its a shortage of apartments. Do you agree ?
 

Watcher2

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Incentivise would be reduced taxes not extra tax :)

Sale proceeds are tax free for starters.

Maybe something along the lines of a 50% reduction in amount assessable to FAIR DEAL.
Not much fair about Fair Deal from what I gather. There is a problem with cost of nursing homes. It does not cost anywhere close to €1,000 per week for elder care that does not require medical treatments. Correct me if I am wrong, but what I tend to hear is that nursing home care, regardless of medical needs, starts at about a grand a week.
 

hammer

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Not much fair about Fair Deal from what I gather. There is a problem with cost of nursing homes. It does not cost anywhere close to €1,000 per week for elder care that does not require medical treatments. Correct me if I am wrong, but what I tend to hear is that nursing home care, regardless of medical needs, starts at about a grand a week.
DISLIKE button needed.

Yes, Dublin is about €1250 per week.

SCANDALOUS.
 

Watcher2

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Discussing housing on SOR now with Danny McCoy.

Full employment - dysfunctional housing.
More resources for infrastructure.
80'000 new people needed for the house building programme.
14'000 houses built last year - need 50'000.
High cost of development land - 55% state costs.
Vacant site tax not working - bundle with LPT.
Is there a vacant site tax in place? That's the first I've heard that one exists.
 

HarshBuzz

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Indeed they can. But I dont think pushing people out of their homes just because their children have left home is necessarily the answer. I know you are not advocating pushing them out but you are advocating a "lean" type approach where everyone is in a "perfectly sized" dwelling where there is no "wastage" of rooms.

That's not the problem we are experiencing, or even a solution. Its not a dearth of adequately sized properties, just a shortage of properties themselves.
It is part of the problem.

These under-utilised dwellings are typically perfectly located (in Dublin) for families. In areas with little scope for further building.

I don't see why it's so appalling to suggest that we could at least think about how we might develop policies that utilise this existing stock better. In a way that does not penalise existing owners and without compunction. Such a policy would also be more environmentally sustainable than even more urban sprawl.

If we matched up demand to 'number of bedrooms', we might see that the crisis is less acute than perceived.
 

Franzoni

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Not much fair about Fair Deal from what I gather. There is a problem with cost of nursing homes. It does not cost anywhere close to €1,000 per week for elder care that does not require medical treatments. Correct me if I am wrong, but what I tend to hear is that nursing home care, regardless of medical needs, starts at about a grand a week.
Five to six grand a month depending ....something like Dementia/Alzheimers where you need a secure location and you are looking at the upper end of the scale if it includes things like getting the laundry done in house.......
 

Man or Mouse

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That is true but not attractive to us. I like the fact that I can cycle out of my estate head uphill(very uphill) and head to Laaragh via Sally Gap and four hours later pedal in to a green and pleasant estate. This isn't about money. I feel I deserve it. I did forty two years teaching missing a total of eight days of which four related to my kids rather than me.
Top man. Pity there aren't more like you.
 

Man or Mouse

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HAP is bizarre - your son's tax is driving up the price he has to pay for rent himself and making it harder to save a deposit to avail of any FTB grant...meanwhile the landlords and developers are very much back in Tiger economy space.
All true but for the highlighted bit. I'll give you one guess where that came from, or at least the bulk of it anyway.
 

gatsbygirl20

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Good for you!

Except (just to point it out), you could downsize now, stick the difference in the bank, invest in the stock market, buy gold bullion, whatever you choose and your heirs would still inherit the proceeds upon your demise (in 70 or 80 years :p). Holding on to your under-occupied house is not a barrier to this.
Older people in solid mature estates like living there for reasons that are not always about money

They have memories, roots, neighbours they know and trust, familiarity..

Change is harder to adapt to as you age.

They have finally paid off the mortgage and are looking forward to finally enjoying the fruits of their labour
 

GDPR

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Older people in solid mature estates like living there for reasons that are not always about money

They have memories, roots, neighbours they know and trust, familiarity..

Change is harder to adapt to as you age.

They have finally paid off the mortgage and are looking forward to finally enjoying the fruits of their labour
I think we need to be more creative with the mix of house types in an area, to cater for down sizing within the same community.
 

Civic_critic2

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Older people in solid mature estates like living there for reasons that are not always about money

They have memories, roots, neighbours they know and trust, familiarity..

Change is harder to adapt to as you age.

They have finally paid off the mortgage and are looking forward to finally enjoying the fruits of their labour
No surprise the 'I suffered sh1t, now it's your turn' merchant would pipe in on this topic.

For the rest, there's a couple of astroturfers or socks doing a two-hander pretending to have a conversation to 'launch' this idea in social media along with its launch in the mainstream media.
 

pedagogus

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That is a perfectly valid choice.

I wonder if attractive, well-designed apartments were available in your area - would downsizing be an option you would ever consider?
I see nothing wrong with that in principle and I know several people who have moved to apartments near Marley Park which is an attractive area. However I like gardens and even more garden sheds. I am fairly handy and my skills and the contents of my shed have come in useful as my kids have bought houses. I was able to save them money by helping them fit warmboards, roof insulation etc
In fact I am about to raid my shed once again to help my youngest who has bought an old small terrace house in the inner city needing lots of renovation.
In short, no apartment for me.
 

gatsbygirl20

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I think we need to be more creative with the mix of house types in an area, to cater for down sizing within the same community.
Yes, the idea of having some smaller units, or apartments--but crucially, in the same area where the older person has lived all their life---might offer some solution

But of course when you try to build these in settled areas there are objections

These kind of apartments were mooted in the Mount Merrion area

Elderly couples already living in the area expressed great interest.

Of course there were objections, including from Shane Ross a minister in a government which is trying to tackle the housing crisis.

The plans were overturned, and no doubt the houses and apartments will be eventually built in an area where residents have less clout

I agree that we should have a variety of housing in the same area, but older citizens get very touchy on the subject if they feel a sort of moral pressure is building up on them to leave their family home because it is seen as too large, and they should free it up for others
 

gatsbygirl20

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I see nothing wrong with that in principle and I know several people who have moved to apartments near Marley Park which is an attractive area. However I like gardens and even more garden sheds. I am fairly handy and my skills and the contents of my shed have come in useful as my kids have bought houses. I was able to save them money by helping them fit warmboards, roof insulation etc
In fact I am about to raid my shed once again to help my youngest who has bought an old small terrace house in the inner city needing lots of renovation.
In short, no apartment for me.
How lucky your grown-up children are to have your skills. This work--ripping and digging at old houses--costs a fortune

And how lucky you are to have children with their own homes bought

My lot are still living with me in their twenties. Not a hope of renting, never mind buying, ón their meagre wages
 

pedagogus

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How lucky your grown-up children are to have your skills. This work--ripping and digging at old houses--costs a fortune

And how lucky you are to have children with their own homes bought

My lot are still living with me in their twenties. Not a hope of renting, never mind buying, ón their meagre wages
Well, the youngest very nearly didn't make it as he was gazumped by an offer which then fell through. The other two are near me which is great as I mind a grandchild. Prices have moved up even in the last six months pushing very modest houses in less sought after areas out of reach for young couples unless Mammy and Daddy are loaded.
As regards saving them money I conservatively estimate that I have saved the youngest about 9 or 10 grand. In fairness he unlike his siblings has good hands despite being in a particularly nerdy profession.
 


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