Housing crisis can be fixed overnight but the government refuses to implement the most obvious solution.

Ardillaun

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If some of the quids stuck in the primary residence were sitting in a bank account instead, I suspect a proportion (and by no means all, free country etc.) of the older generation might be tempted to indulge themselves a little more. The potential for a conflict of interest when kids are talking to their parents about downsizing is not hard to see.
 
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storybud1

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Older people in solid mature estates like living there for reasons that are not always about money

They have memories, roots, neighbours they know and trust, familiarity..

Change is harder to adapt to as you age.

They have finally paid off the mortgage and are looking forward to finally enjoying the fruits of their labour
they were young once and fair play if they want to shoot snowflakes in the face ,where do I sign up ?
 

Watcher2

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It is part of the problem.

These under-utilised dwellings are typically perfectly located (in Dublin) for families. In areas with little scope for further building.

I don't see why it's so appalling to suggest that we could at least think about how we might develop policies that utilise this existing stock better. In a way that does not penalise existing owners and without compunction. Such a policy would also be more environmentally sustainable than even more urban sprawl.

If we matched up demand to 'number of bedrooms', we might see that the crisis is less acute than perceived.
How would that match be performed and what would it cost? It sounds even more expensive that means testing benefits.

And "appalling" is your word HB, not mine. Have a think about that for a minute.
 

Watcher2

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Five to six grand a month depending ....something like Dementia/Alzheimers where you need a secure location and you are looking at the upper end of the scale if it includes things like getting the laundry done in house.......
Has anyone looked at the cost of this? It all appears very expensive, overly so. And then you had yer man Reilly as the minister for a while with a great interest in the sector. I guess he never commissioned any public reviews of costs by any chance, did he?;)
 

Orbit v2

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St Anne’s Park locals express delight at planning ruling

A residents group campaigning against the development of more than 500 homes on playing pitches beside St Anne’s Park in north Dublin has said it is delighted that its legal challenge has been accepted.
So, that's 500 homeless families that can't be accommodated until this issue is resolved. I'm so happy for the St Annes residents.

Our hope would be that these lands would be protected going forward and they would revest back to their use up to now as playing fields, and for the use of the geese and other endangered species.”
Seriously, does every piece of urban greenery have to be protected now for feckin geese?

The article doesn't say what the error made by ABP was and whether it's merely a technical one that can be corrected. But, the delay is problematic.
 

myrak

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Jul 18, 2010
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The planned houses in a designated parkland will be in a price bracket beyond the capacity of the average paid workers who keep this country moving, taught, nursed and supplied with food, services and goods.

Affordable homes are what’s needed.

The elderly, having spent many years paying for their homes and creating communities are surely entitled to reside in them as long as they live. Many now have their adult children at home again, many provide free childcare, many are the base to which our emigrated generation come home on visits.

What we need is affordable housing -

The idea of developers seeing 40% of young people’s pay as a fair price for cupboard space should not even be considered much less allowed.
 

mr_anderson

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Dec 12, 2007
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Can we stop giving accommodation to all & sundry who arrive on our shores ?

40% of Fingal's housing list are non-Irish.

It would be of immediate benefit to our housing crisis.
 

galteeman

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The nimbys strike again along with planners who often make arbitrary decisions based on personal opinions.
The applicant has not satisfactorily demonstrated that the proposed development would successfully integrate into or enhance the character and public realm of the area.
I am satisfied that the site could sustain an increase in building height in line with recent guidelines and accommodate taller buildings that take account of the receiving environment, but not in the way proposed.
In my experience of dealing with planners they are often divorced from the reality that we live in an imperfect world and sometimes we have to just get on and build things without putting too many hurdles in the way.
 

wombat

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we live in an imperfect world and sometimes we have to just get on and build things without putting too many hurdles in the way.
That was tried and people now have to live with the consequences. Every planning decision can be challenged by locals so it makes sense that a planner should take such objections seriously.
 

shiel

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Feb 14, 2011
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The housing crisis is in large part due to the country being bankrupted by the decisions of a small number of its own most powerful citizens in the pre-2009 period.

That said I do not see much wrong with the proposal in the op.
 

lord

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The same powerful citizens are selling our country now. Ireland and its natural beauty are being devoured by the greed of the few.
 


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