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How can a person get 465 convictions? Does Ireland have law and order?


Nemesiscorporation

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This morning I noticed in the Donegal Daily website a story about a man who has appeared in court with 465 previous convictions.

See: CO DONEGAL MAN HAS 465 CRIMINAL CONVICTIONS, COURT HEARS | Donegal Daily

Could someone please explain in plain language without resorting to dogma, how it is even possible to get 465 convictions?

Between being arrested, giving statements, a couple of visits to a solicitor and court appearances, a crime would take up most of 3 or 4 days for each conviction, which would mean that person has spent at least a full three years of his 39 years in court, speaking to garda and solicitors, if not longer. My brain has bother processing that fact.

People are talking about bankers getting off with everything. It appears that problem is at every level of society.

Bankers are still walking around without being jailed.

Developers have transferred assets to there partners names and the government has made no attempt to retrieve those properties, by seizing them and jailing both the developer and there partner for trying to evade there responsibilities.

Everyone has been angry at bankers, politicians and developers and rightly so (I personally would prefer a more medieval approach to dealing with them).

However I do not hear the same anger against people who have over 20, 40, 80, 100 or more, criminal convictions.

Someone who has 100 or 200 convictions has most likely caused as much damage to the economy of the country as a small to medium sized developer taken over by NAMA. For one criminal conviction once you add up Garda time, Solicitor fees, court fees, damage caused by the criminal, etc, it will run to thousands of Euros if not more. If there are 100 to 500 people with over 100 convictions for various crimes such as burglary, vandalism, drug dealing, rape etc, the cost to society in cleaning up the mess after them would soon mount up to levels approaching that of a director in a bank or a large developer. Someone with 500 convictions will have done damage to the economy at the level of a major developer.

Someone who has one, two three or even four criminal convictions, would not bother me, as quite a few of us have done at least one completely idiotic thing in our lives. Situations can arise that can set of events leading to a conviction. Leaving aside I think that there should be a law whereby you get ten convictions and you get automatic life in jail, I do think that once a person is over 10 convictions, they are no longer in the territory of being misunderstood, personal problems or anything else. They clearly are either a psychopath or sociopath intent on causing as much damage to society as they can.

There is so many problems such as developers running up billion euro debts, banking directors helping there rich friends, politicians helping there connected friends, heroin dealers, protection rackets, people stealing to order, vandalism, etc, that I would find it hard to believe we do not have a serious cultural issue of turning a blind eye to breaking the law, that we in fact need a serious cultural change to correct some of the problems in our society.

I would like to suggest that in Ireland we have a general law and order problem through every strata of society, from the top to bottom, regardless of social class, upbringing, religious belief, status or any other possible means of differentiating people in society.

What is you opinion?


PS: 465 convictions is not a misprint. It is the real number of actual convictions in court that person received.
 
Last edited:


corporal punishment

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I would imagine the figure includes crime sprees where the criminal commits up to 100 crimes before being caught. They are all then taken into consideration and add up to a fairly hefty total.
 

daveL

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I would imagine the figure includes crime sprees where the criminal commits up to 100 crimes before being caught. They are all then taken into consideration and add up to a fairly hefty total.
do you think anyone going on crime sprees made up of 100+ offences should be wandering about?
 

Ren84

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Doesn't surprise me. The "justice" system is a joke in this country. While struggling businessmen are imprisoned for non payment of VAT on bloody garlic rapists walk free. Disgraceful stuff.
 

Sync

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I would imagine the figure includes crime sprees where the criminal commits up to 100 crimes before being caught. They are all then taken into consideration and add up to a fairly hefty total.
I'm sure there are overlaps, but that shouldn't take away from his achievment. It just goes to show, if you work hard enough at something, you can still be ****ing terrible at it.

465? 465??? You are the worst criminal ever. You're the opposite of everyone else who thinks "This work thing's not working out for me, it's time to hit crime". THIS IS YOUR WORK. And you're awful at it. Surely after the 300th coviction he would have thought "This robbery stuff isn't for me, I'm off to do Marine Biology degree"
 

Sister Mercedes

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The Law in Ireland protects those at the Top and at the Bottom. It is those in the Middle who pay.
 

Ren84

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I would imagine the figure includes crime sprees where the criminal commits up to 100 crimes before being caught. They are all then taken into consideration and add up to a fairly hefty total.
The guy had 465 convictions, a bit of a difference. Someone in front of a judge that many times is a clear indictment (no pun intended) of the failures of our sham legal system.
 

Nemesiscorporation

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I would imagine the figure includes crime sprees where the criminal commits up to 100 crimes before being caught. They are all then taken into consideration and add up to a fairly hefty total.
I know of a few of these people in Donegal. It is nearly always an individual case. Taken into consideration is rarer than you think with those people.

I know someone who went to give evidence regarding a break in and she saw three separate solicitors giving their business cards to the guy with 60 convictions, who broke in to her neighbours house and ransacked it.
 
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do you think anyone going on crime sprees made up of 100+ offences should be wandering about?
Thing is they shouldn't, but if they're careful enough they can do so.

The crimes taken into consideration thing is probably the key here.

It's a rotten system which benefits both sides but possibly not society.

For the criminal it removes the fear of being subsequently done for the additional crimes. He may also decide to throw in crimes committed by his friends in order to stall any further investigation in them.

The cops benefit by virtue of having open cases "resolved".

And in some cases they guys who actually committed the crime walk free.
 

fuque

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4,512
This morning I noticed in the Donegal Daily website a story about a man who has appeared in court with 465 previous convictions.

See: CO DONEGAL MAN HAS 465 CRIMINAL CONVICTIONS, COURT HEARS | Donegal Daily

Could someone please explain in plain language without resorting to dogma, how it is even possible to get 465 convictions?

Between being arrested, giving statements, a couple of visits to a solicitor and court appearances, a crime would take up most of 3 or 4 days for each conviction, which would mean that person has spent at least a full three years of his 39 years in court, speaking to garda and solicitors, if not longer. My brain has bother processing that fact.

People are talking about bankers getting off with everything. It appears that problem is at every level of society.

Bankers are still walking around without being jailed.

Developers have transferred assets to there partners names and the government has made no attempt to retrieve those properties, by seizing them and jailing both the developer and there partner for trying to evade there responsibilities.

Everyone has been angry at bankers, politicians and developers and rightly so (I personally would prefer a more medieval approach to dealing with them).

However I do not hear the same anger against people who have over 20, 40, 80, 100 or more, criminal convictions.

Someone who has 100 or 200 convictions has most likely caused as much damage to the economy of the country as a small to medium sized developer taken over by NAMA. For one criminal conviction once you add up Garda time, Solicitor fees, court fees, damage caused by the criminal, etc, it will run to thousands of Euros if not more. If there are 100 to 500 people with over 100 convictions for various crimes such as burglary, vandalism, drug dealing, rape etc, the cost to society in cleaning up the mess after them would soon mount up to levels approaching that of a director in a bank or a large developer. Someone with 500 convictions will have done damage to the economy at the level of a major developer.

Someone who has one, two three or even four criminal convictions, would not bother me, as quite a few of us have done at least one completely idiotic thing in our lives. Situations can arise that can set of events leading to a conviction. Leaving aside I think that there should be a law whereby you get ten convictions and you get automatic life in jail, I do think that once a person is over 10 convictions, they are no longer in the territory of being misunderstood, personal problems or anything else. They clearly are either a psychopath or sociopath intent on causing as much damage to society as they can.

There is so many problems such as developers running up billion euro debts, banking directors helping there rich friends, politicians helping there connected friends, heroin dealers, protection rackets, people stealing to order, vandalism, etc, that I would find it hard to believe we do not have a serious cultural issue of turning a blind eye to breaking the law, that we in fact need a serious cultural change to correct some of the problems in our society.

I would like to suggest that in Ireland we have a general law and order problem through every strata of society, from the top to bottom, regardless of social class, upbringing, religious belief, status or any other possible means of differentiating people in society.

What is you opinion?


PS: 465 convictions is not a misprint. It is the real number of actual convictions in court that person received.
Direland doesnt do law n order. Basically the innocent are dragged to prison for not paying tv license etc, the scum get the revolving door treatment, and the rich dont get convicted full stop, except maybe for sexual offences which they usually just recieve a fine. The mentality is the innocent must be kept in check, the scum dont care, and the rich are "one of our own".
 

nationalsday

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Didn't Frank McBrearty have 160 summons issued against him for breach of the licensing laws in Donegal in 1999, which were withdrawn in June 2000? The subsequent little outing to the Morris Tribunal, over seven years, cost the taxpayer almost eighty million euros. So I suppose if you put that into it's perspective, then this man hasn't really caused that much damage to the economy.
 
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The guy had 465 convictions, a bit of a difference. Someone in front of a judge that many times is a clear indictment (no pun intended) of the failures of our sham legal system.
I'm trying to get the precise word on this, but am coming up dry.

In the meantime, the District Court heard over 300,000 hearings in 2005 alone. Many of these must consist of minor "Guilty your Honour" cases where there's neither the time nor the inclination to do anything more than slap down a small fine and move on.

Are the courts interconnected at District Court level?
 

Ren84

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I'm trying to get the precise word on this, but am coming up dry.

In the meantime, the District Court heard over 300,000 hearings in 2005 alone. Many of these must consist of minor "Guilty your Honour" cases where there's neither the time nor the inclination to do anything more than slap down a small fine and move on.

Are the courts interconnected at District Court level?
Most of those hearings would be adjournments where the judge simply cannot be arsed to hear the case until a later specified time. Happens too many times in the lower courts where judges will give concessions to defendants and give them the benefit of the doubt.
 

Analyzer

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465 convictions ?

I reckon he is a one man stimulus program for the Donegal legal profession.

Without him, there would be less beemers and mercs sold in Donegal to lawyers.

The Incorporated Law Society should give him some sort of present, to thank him for what is doing for them.
 
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Most of those hearings would be adjournments where the judge simply cannot be arsed to hear the case until a later specified time. Happens too many times in the lower courts where judges will give concessions to defendants and give them the benefit of the doubt.
Aye, I reckoned that many of these would be largely procedural.
 

carruthers

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Apr 30, 2008
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3 strikes in two years gets you 10 years. It is expensive to keep some in jail, granted, but it cannot be as expensive as leaving a tool like this at large. Garda time, Insurance costs, legal costs transporting the idiot back and forth from prison... never mind the emotional cost this man has incurred on others. I pay my taxes to be protected from people such as this. It has to be cheaper to give him a very long stretch. I really have as little time for some members of the Judiciary as I have for some who are brought before them.
 

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