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How can Ireland benefit from the U.K. leaving the EU?

Kevin Parlon

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Of course it will. Sure wasn't that what the whole Brexit thing boiled down to in the end. How else do you expect them to police their border?
Free movement into the UK is more important to us than free movement into the rest of Europe. Whatever accommodation is worked out, moving between IRL and UK will never be like going to the US.
 


sic transit

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Free movement into the UK is more important to us than free movement into the rest of Europe. Whatever accommodation is worked out, moving between IRL and UK will never be like going to the US.
Boris is now muttering about a points system for immigration. Will we be an OK type of "furriner" who'll be largely exempt or will they have us taking English tests as well?
 

Cruimh

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purpledon

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Other countries are likely to be thinking the same thing. If companies make strategic decisions to look elsewhere, how are we the vultures to seek opportunities to accommodate them?
Well Brian Hayes, FG's man in Europe and the man who lost FG the election stated this morning that our corporation tax is a red line issue. If the EU messes with that Ireland is out of the EU.

Someone should tell the little fcker that it's not his call.

First off, there's a lot I'd like to know about the FDIs in Ireland.

a) how much of a sweetner did they get from successive Irish governments to set up here?:-
b) how much tax have they actually paid & are they paying 12%?:-
c) how many Irish citizens do they actually employ?
 

sic transit

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Well Brian Hayes, FG's man in Europe and the man who lost FG the election stated this morning that our corporation tax is a red line issue. If the EU messes with that Ireland is out of the EU.

Someone should tell the little fcker that it's not his call.

First off, there's a lot I'd like to know about the FDIs in Ireland.

a) how much of a sweetner did they get from successive Irish governments to set up here?:-
b) how much tax have they actually paid & are they paying 12%?:-
c) how many Irish citizens do they actually employ?
The issue is really about the accounting practices of very large corporations. A common corporate tax would need negotiations and Hayes is right - it is a red line issue for any Irish government.

As for your questions the first is used by every country, seem to recall a figure of up to €15K per employee for one. That tax rate is the same for businesses large and small and unless they are unlimited entities, adn readily available. The last one depends on skills and we fall short in some, especially languages and high level IT.
 

ger12

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Free movement into the UK is more important to us than free movement into the rest of Europe. Whatever accommodation is worked out, moving between IRL and UK will never be like going to the US.
I'll ask again, how do you think they'll police their border?
 

GDPR

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Boris is now muttering about a points system for immigration. Will we be an OK type of "furriner" who'll be largely exempt or will they have us taking English tests as well?
Well they would have to repeal their national legislation - free movement of peoples between Britain and Ireland has nothing to do with the EU and predates it by fifty years.
 

Cellachán Chaisil

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Well they would have to repeal their national legislation - free movement of peoples between Britain and Ireland has nothing to do with the EU and predates it by fifty years.
Yes repealing national legislation is the hardest thing to do.

Parliaments never change or make laws!
 

purpledon

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The issue is really about the accounting practices of very large corporations. A common corporate tax would need negotiations and Hayes is right - it is a red line issue for any Irish government.

As for your questions the first is used by every country, seem to recall a figure of up to €15K per employee for one. That tax rate is the same for businesses large and small and unless they are unlimited entities, adn readily available. The last one depends on skills and we fall short in some, especially languages and high level IT.
So the Irish government have been paying €15,000 to foreign corporations to employ foreign people in this country and the corporations then don't pay their taxes. What sense does that actually make.

Money would have been better spent on indigenous business.
 

gatsbygirl20

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The issue is really about the accounting practices of very large corporations. A common corporate tax would need negotiations and Hayes is right - it is a red line issue for any Irish government.

As for your questions the first is used by every country, seem to recall a figure of up to €15K per employee for one. That tax rate is the same for businesses large and small and unless they are unlimited entities, adn readily available. The last one depends on skills and we fall short in some, especially languages and high level IT.

Brexit has made explicit what in the past used to be a sort of fudge. It has drawn attention to stuff best left unspoken, perhaps.

The less said about corporation tax the better. Ireland has not a leg to stand on on that issue, but was hoping to muddle along. Now with the UK having to come up with innovate thinking in the new post-Brexit scenario , corporation tax will start to become an even hotter topic

Likewise with the North. The GFA was a sort of fudge that did not bear much scrutiny, but it worked. Every side could claim something, even if they were all contradicting each other. In Northern Ireland you were Irish, British, European....if the Irish versus British identity got too controversial, you could invoke the European identity
Now you have Ian Paisley Jnr this morning tweeting about instructions to Northerners on how they can apply for an Irish passport

Some things are better left in the realm of fudge. They do not bear much scrutiny in the light of day.
 

Spanner Island

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The Irish Government should, through its various departments and bodies be contacting all business that located itself in the UK because they were English speaking and in the EU and inform them that Ireland is open for business.
Hmmmm...

Already there have been reports of banks in London thinking of relocating at least a proportion of their workers to other EU locations including Dublin...

Whether or not this comes to pass we'll find out in time I guess... although I can't say I relish the idea of a load of w*nker bankers landing on us... not with all the pressure that would undoubtedly put on property prices and the like... not when we're in the midst of a housing crisis anyway...

We're basically not ready for any significant influx.
 

Spanner Island

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Inda thinks nothing will change

Brexit will not impact on plans for Budget 2017, says Taoiseach

save us from these dopes
Watching Britain currently, it's increasingly looking like the EU actually saves EU electorates from themselves.

I'm certainly no fan of the EU as it is... it definitely needs to change.

But I wouldn't vote to leave it... not when I look at the kind of dopes who look like they'll end up 'governing' Britain... Johnson, Gove, Reese Mogg, Fox etc... and as bad... when I look at our lot of eejits.

Giving free rein to any of them with no oversight is not advisable... imo.
 

Spanner Island

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Well that's because Britain will still be inside the EU in 2017.
It's looking more likely as the ramifications play out... although I wouldn't bet the house on it.

I cannot see the Brexiteers or those who voted to leave accepting Britain remaining. Social unrest could break out if they try.

If Britain remains now it's also possible its influence will be greatly diminished within the EU.

They really did shoot themselves in the foot.

I also doubt the 'divorce' is going to be on Britain's terms despite what many of the Brexiteers assumed and presumed in their arrogance.

And prolonging the uncertainty by delaying triggering article 50 isn't going to do them any favours in subsequent 'negotiations' either... I wouldn't think.
 

gatsbygirl20

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Hmmmm...

Already there have been reports of banks in London thinking of relocating at least a proportion of their workers to other EU locations including Dublin...

Whether or not this comes to pass we'll find out in time I guess...

although I can't say I relish the idea of a load of w*nker bankers landing on us...
:D Hordes of bankers descending on us....That'll be worse than the immigrants...Bankers camping in tents at Holyhead.....sneaking in on the back of trucks...we can put them into holding pens or direct provision...
 


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