How Come The Irish Are So Successful In Foreign Media?

Zach Dingle

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Just heard recently that along with being a hit in Ireland and The UK, Mrs Browne's Boys is now huge in Austrailia. Mrs Browne even presents a quiz show there! Actually 'she' could easily out Anne Robinson the great Anne Robinson if 'She' got 'The Weakest Link'! Also James Creedon and a few more pop up on France 24, not to mention past successes such as Eammon Andrews, Terry Wogan, Gaybo in Grenada TV and modern successes such as Norton. Chris Moyles, Steven Coogan and Judy Finnegan and 'Mrs Merton' are all of Irish descent and the amount of Irish surnames when the credits roll after British tv productions really stand out! Also the Beeb have commissioned though not necessarily produced a lot of Irish writers! So how come this is the case is it down to the gift of the gab or an artistic streak or an eccentric element about us!
 


Mercurial

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Mrs. Browne's Boys is perhaps not the best example of Irish success.
 

Zach Dingle

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Mrs. Browne's Boys is perhaps not the best example of Irish success.
Yes, but successful it is, in the haypenny place, in my opinion compared with Father Ted, which bombed in Austrailia, though could perhaps do better if rereleased there now!
 

Hitch 22

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We have a tiny goldfish bowl entertainment industry dominated by a tiny set that pats itself on the back, is rife with nepotism and consciously stifles up and coming talent. Unless you have been "talent" scouted by this "in" crowd, unless you are related to the right person and unless you parrot the same ideology you will get nowhere. Therefore the same old fogies dominate television, the airways, literary publishing, theatre, movies, music and so on. If you want to make it you have get out of Ireland and go to London, New York or L.A. Once you make abroad you will be slavishly brown nosed by the entertainment establishment in Ireland.
The IFTA's are the classic example and the pained expressions of Irish international stars resemble the faces of people who have long since outgrown the small minded town they grew up in, forced to attend a secondary school reunion where they must be civil to Micko who was once the top school hurler and now drives the creamery tanker truck who once bullied them in 6th year for not being sporty.
When an Irish talent returns to Ireland after failing to make it in Hollywood or London they are banished to the Christmas panto and sneered at by "I-told-you-sos" who still socialize in the same pubs they hung out in when they were drama and arts students.
 

Jackass

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The reason is plain and simple. Who would stay in Ireland and become a yes person to the media bosses. The media in Ireland is very,very poor. You only have to look at the horrific reporting in the Herald to realise how bad things are.
 

Iphonista

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The reason is plain and simple. Who would stay in Ireland and become a yes person to the media bosses. The media in Ireland is very,very poor. You only have to look at the horrific reporting in the Herald to realise how bad things are.
Ridiculous logic regardless of whether it's true. Bad media makes for successful media people? Cop yourself on.
 

Iphonista

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We have a tiny goldfish bowl entertainment industry dominated by a tiny set that pats itself on the back, is rife with nepotism and consciously stifles up and coming talent. Unless you have been "talent" scouted by this "in" crowd, unless you are related to the right person and unless you parrot the same ideology you will get nowhere. Therefore the same old fogies dominate television, the airways, literary publishing, theatre, movies, music and so on. If you want to make it you have get out of Ireland and go to London, New York or L.A. Once you make abroad you will be slavishly brown nosed by the entertainment establishment in Ireland.
The IFTA's are the classic example and the pained expressions of Irish international stars resemble the faces of people who have long since outgrown the small minded town they grew up in, forced to attend a secondary school reunion where they must be civil to Micko who was once the top school hurler and now drives the creamery tanker truck who once bullied them in 6th year for not being sporty.
When an Irish talent returns to Ireland after failing to make it in Hollywood or London they are banished to the Christmas panto and sneered at by "I-told-you-sos" who still socialize in the same pubs they hung out in when they were drama and arts students.
Thank you for the rant. Did you notice the OP on your way in? Just wondering....
 

Sister Mercedes

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You've picked about a dozen examples over 50 years. Hardly an embarrassment of success. And half of those you named, like Caroline Ahearne, are of Irish ancestry rather than Irish.
 

eyelight

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So how come this is the case is it down to the gift of the gab or an artistic streak or an eccentric element about us!
"When the Irishman is found outside of Ireland in another environment, he very often becomes a respected man. The economic and intellectual conditions that prevail in his own country do not permit the development of individuality. No one who has any self-respect stays in Ireland, but flees afar as though from a country that has undergone the visitation of an angered Jove."
- James Joyce
 

eyelight

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We have a tiny goldfish bowl entertainment industry dominated by a tiny set that pats itself on the back, is rife with nepotism and consciously stifles up and coming talent. Unless you have been "talent" scouted by this "in" crowd, unless you are related to the right person and unless you parrot the same ideology you will get nowhere. Therefore the same old fogies dominate television, the airways, literary publishing, theatre, movies, music and so on. If you want to make it you have get out of Ireland and go to London, New York or L.A. Once you make abroad you will be slavishly brown nosed by the entertainment establishment in Ireland.
The IFTA's are the classic example and the pained expressions of Irish international stars resemble the faces of people who have long since outgrown the small minded town they grew up in, forced to attend a secondary school reunion where they must be civil to Micko who was once the top school hurler and now drives the creamery tanker truck who once bullied them in 6th year for not being sporty.
When an Irish talent returns to Ireland after failing to make it in Hollywood or London they are banished to the Christmas panto and sneered at by "I-told-you-sos" who still socialize in the same pubs they hung out in when they were drama and arts students.

You know, Mr. Hitch 22, there is very very little I would ever agree with you about, and I find many of your posts here contemptuous, but this post is brilliant. You hit the nail on the head. Congratulations.
Agree 100%.
I've lived it.
 
D

Deleted member 39930

We have a tiny goldfish bowl entertainment industry dominated by a tiny set that pats itself on the back, is rife with nepotism and consciously stifles up and coming talent. Unless you have been "talent" scouted by this "in" crowd, unless you are related to the right person and unless you parrot the same ideology you will get nowhere. Therefore the same old fogies dominate television, the airways, literary publishing, theatre, movies, music and so on. If you want to make it you have get out of Ireland and go to London, New York or L.A. Once you make abroad you will be slavishly brown nosed by the entertainment establishment in Ireland.
The IFTA's are the classic example and the pained expressions of Irish international stars resemble the faces of people who have long since outgrown the small minded town they grew up in, forced to attend a secondary school reunion where they must be civil to Micko who was once the top school hurler and now drives the creamery tanker truck who once bullied them in 6th year for not being sporty.
When an Irish talent returns to Ireland after failing to make it in Hollywood or London they are banished to the Christmas panto and sneered at by "I-told-you-sos" who still socialize in the same pubs they hung out in when they were drama and arts students.
Brendan O'Carroll was interviewed by Gaybo on his pseudo religious sunday night programme recently - and the mutual loathing was apparent for all to see. Perhaps because he did what Gaybo couldn't - become popular outside of Ireland, and possibly because he is not of the cozy meeja clique in Montrose
 

PeeOKneel

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Brendan O'Carroll was interviewed by Gaybo on his pseudo religious sunday night programme recently - and the mutual loathing was apparent for all to see. Perhaps because he did what Gaybo couldn't - become popular outside of Ireland, and possibly because he is not of the cozy meeja clique in Montrose
possibly may have a little to do with our accents which are often considered quite lyrical. Also re Irish success abroad in many areas it may have to do with as a friend of mine put being so used to dealing with conniving classist redneck scum as a matter of course in Ireland that when you deal with people who en masse are not like that at all, you are given a fair shot and having had to deal with such scum previously, you are better prepared if and when you meet them abroad!
 

Shqiptar

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Just heard recently that along with being a hit in Ireland and The UK, Mrs Browne's Boys is now huge in Austrailia. Mrs Browne even presents a quiz show there! Actually 'she' could easily out Anne Robinson the great Anne Robinson if 'She' got 'The Weakest Link'! Also James Creedon and a few more pop up on France 24, not to mention past successes such as Eammon Andrews, Terry Wogan, Gaybo in Grenada TV and modern successes such as Norton. Chris Moyles, Steven Coogan and Judy Finnegan and 'Mrs Merton' are all of Irish descent and the amount of Irish surnames when the credits roll after British tv productions really stand out! Also the Beeb have commissioned though not necessarily produced a lot of Irish writers! So how come this is the case is it down to the gift of the gab or an artistic streak or an eccentric element about us!
I'd rather a visit to the dentist than Mrs Brown's Boys but it's no worse than the cr_p the Aussies sell to RTÉ and TV3.
 

eyelight

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Brendan O'Carroll was interviewed by Gaybo on his pseudo religious sunday night programme recently - and the mutual loathing was apparent for all to see. Perhaps because he did what Gaybo couldn't - become popular outside of Ireland, and possibly because he is not of the cozy meeja clique in Montrose
He's still a grubby little sleezeball knacker though.
There are a lot of morons round the world who'll watch his pap.
Lowest common denominator.
 

Mackers

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Could it be that there is such a closed shop of banal twats in RTE that half decent presenters can't get a look in?
 

sgtharper

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It was certainly popular in the UK, where I saw the DVD sets of it being released in large numbers before they were in Ireland.
To be honest I've yet to hear anyone here in my neck of the woods in the UK refer to Mrs. Brown's Boys at all, this was not the case with Father Ted, episodes of which are still quoted and referred to in conversation. It might have sold well in Kilburn and similar areas but it seems to be rather "under the radar" in the rest of the country?
 

sgtharper

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Brendan O'Carroll was interviewed by Gaybo on his pseudo religious sunday night programme recently - and the mutual loathing was apparent for all to see. Perhaps because he did what Gaybo couldn't - become popular outside of Ireland, and possibly because he is not of the cozy meeja clique in Montrose
Actually I seem to recall that Gaybo was head-hunted by the UK media when he worked for (I think) Granada, back in the day. He was uninterested apparently, and wanted to stay in Ireland, as did Larry Gogan I hear. A good few years ago I read an article in one of the Sunday broadsheets about Gaybo in which he was praised as one of the finest chat-show hosts in the world and the LLS as a classic of the genre?
A case of the "prophet in his own country" syndrome perhaps?
 


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