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How do Unionists feel about Irishness in general?

Mattarigna

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Well, St. Patrick's day is over now. I hope that all enjoyed it.

For some reason, I feel that this is a good time to ask - how do Unionists in general seem to reject all forms of Irishness, when they live on the same island as the "Natives"? Using the term "British Isles" to counter that doesn't work - it is common practise to name Island chains after the biggest geographical island in the chain, and that island is called "Britain", which is a different island. That's that island, this is this one.

Also, what would Unionists make of St. Patrick's day? Just wondering.
 


runwiththewind

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Well, St. Patrick's day is over now. I hope that all enjoyed it.

For some reason, I feel that this is a good time to ask - how do Unionists in general seem to reject all forms of Irishness, when they live on the same island as the "Natives"? Using the term "British Isles" to counter that doesn't work - it is common practise to name Island chains after the biggest geographical island in the chain, and that island is called "Britain", which is a different island. That's that island, this is this one.

Also, what would Unionists make of St. Patrick's day? Just wondering.
Most ignore it as word Irish pops up too frequently, just like the colour green. Some are attempting to hijack him as the first Protestant to arrive on this island and that they are in fact, his natural descendants. Others, in attempting to find an "orange" definition for St. Patrick and his legacy, have tied themselves in knots that a definition of the the saint and his day has become impossible because the mental gymnastics required has become so convoluted that they can't unravel themselves. All this is just in NI. They simply cannot think of the meaning of St. Patrick and the day in the Rep - that is way too much to think about, so they don't go there.

All-in-all, it's great craic to watch.
 

tokkie

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Who cares? If they want to be Irish let them. If they don't, then let them be too. Life is too short to be dealing with these people and their wide array of peculiarities.
 

euryalus

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Also, what would Unionists make of St. Patrick's day? Just wondering.
I don't know what Ulster Unionists think about St Patrick, but in other parts of the United Kingdom he is regarded as one of the four "home" saints, and celebrated accordingly - indeed, as he was British (unlike St George), he seems to be particularly revered, especially within the Anglican church, which has always been mildly nationalistic in such matters.
 

Mattarigna

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I don't know what Ulster Unionists think about St Patrick, but in other parts of the United Kingdom he is regarded as one of the four "home" saints, and celebrated accordingly - indeed, as he was British (unlike St George), he seems to be particularly revered, especially within the Anglican church, which has always been mildly nationalistic in such matters.
How would that work when most of Ireland isn't in the UK?
 

Mattarigna

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Who cares? If they want to be Irish let them. If they don't, then let them be too. Life is too short to be dealing with these people and their wide array of peculiarities.
Well, it will be an interesting life, at least.
 

euryalus

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How would that work when most of Ireland isn't in the UK?
I don't understand the question. St Patrick is more popular in England than St George, that's all I am saying. My very first school history lesson, in a Church of England school, was about St Patrick.
 

Mattarigna

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I don't understand the question. St Patrick is more popular in England than St George, that's all I am saying. My very first school history lesson, in a Church of England school, was about St Patrick.
I suppose I find it strange that the patron saint of a different country is more popular in England than their own patron saint.
 

euryalus

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I suppose I find it strange that the patron saint of a different country is more popular in England than their own patron saint.
Yes, but to a Unionist, St Patrick is not "the saint of a different country", he is one of four national saints who are associated with a single country known as "The United Kingdom".
 

Cruimh

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Well, St. Patrick's day is over now. I hope that all enjoyed it.

For some reason, I feel that this is a good time to ask - how do Unionists in general seem to reject all forms of Irishness, when they live on the same island as the "Natives"? Using the term "British Isles" to counter that doesn't work - it is common practise to name Island chains after the biggest geographical island in the chain, and that island is called "Britain", which is a different island. That's that island, this is this one.

Also, what would Unionists make of St. Patrick's day? Just wondering.
Another Toman Special LOL
 

Mattarigna

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Yes, but to a Unionist, St Patrick is not "the saint of a different country", he is one of four national saints who are associated with a single country known as "The United Kingdom".
But Ireland is not in the UK.....well, the vast majority of it isn't.
 

Cruimh

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Another Cruimh special right there.....
A daft OP - have a read at some of the threads.

So in general Unionists reject all forms of Irishness?

Grand Orange Lodge of Ireland

How did Ian Paisley as head of the DUP and First Minister greet Bertie Ahern?

Some say hedges make the best neighbours, but that is not the case. I don’t believe we should plant a hedge between our two countries … I am proud to be an Ulsterman but I am also proud of my Irish roots … Today, we can confidently state that we are making progress to ensure that our two countries can develop and grow side by side in a spirit of generous co-operation. Old barriers and threats have been, and are being, removed daily. Business opportunities are flourishing and genuine respect for and understanding of each other’s differences, and for that matter, similarities, is now developing.
 

runwiththewind

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Yes, but to a Unionist, St Patrick is not "the saint of a different country", he is one of four national saints who are associated with a single country known as "The United Kingdom".
Naturally there is no though given to what St. Patrick means to the people of the Rep. You know, the country that is not part of the UK. Besides, it's only recently that unionist have "rediscovered" him and are thinking about "reclaiming" him, so that kicks your theory of St. Patrick being one of your "four" national saints into touch.
 

euryalus

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I think this thread has already degenerated into a "dialogue of the deaf", and I see no point in trying to contribute anything further. I have already said what I believe to be a self-evident truth - ie, that St Patrick is afforded a special place within the Anglican Church, and is and always has been regarded as one of the four patron saints of the United Kingdom. I will, however, conclude with a final observation, which is that, on the island of Ireland, St Patrick has been politicised - hence the element of bigotry that has already seeped into this thread.
 


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