How Have You Found Meeting Fellow Paddies Abroad?

General Urko

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 24, 2012
Messages
15,680
We, Irish, are everywhere, there is no doubt about that. I was just wondering what did you feel about The Irish you met abroad and what sort of image they projected of themselves, (not necessarily projected of us, because, we are not responsible for them). And you can take it from the perspective of yourself travelling abroad on holidays/business or being a resident abroad.
While it is just my experience of a minority of Irish People abroad, some of them were literally among the most pig ignorant people, I ever had the misfortune of coming across, I also found a few Aussies in that category (possibly Irish/British Convicts offspring) and Some Dutch People abroad likewise. I have not found that to be the case with Aussies/Dutch folk here.
Oh and my experiennce includes having travelled with the best football supporters in the world (some of them were extreme piss artists!) and actually living abroad (in the Netherlands, as it happens) as well as travelling on both business and for holidays.
I don't do The Santa Ponzas, IBIZAS etc so I have no experience of UK lager Louts or 18 year old Paddy versions abroad.
From anecdotal evidence, I have heard from Irish folk who lived in America and Britain, the Irish would ve by far the quickest race to screw you and I don't mean sexually!
 


ShoutingIsLeadership

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 17, 2011
Messages
49,731
One should be allowed to set fire to anybody wearing a county jersey, abroad.
 
Joined
Oct 8, 2011
Messages
39,553
I tend to avoid the Irish abroad - or at least in notably "Irish" venues. I didn't leave Ireland as a form of escape, but I've found on a consistent basis that the Irish abroad can sometimes be cliquish, huddling together to bemoan the absence of Denny sausages, Brennan's bread and Lyon's tea.

I love meeting Irish people here, but in the context of saying "we're abroad, so let's get on with it".

Pooled together in an Irish bar it is all too easy to get maudlin about the place.

I'd have cut me mickey off this morning for some Clonakilty black pudding, though.
 

General Urko

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 24, 2012
Messages
15,680
I tend to avoid the Irish abroad - or at least in notably "Irish" venues. I didn't leave Ireland as a form of escape, but I've found on a consistent basis that the Irish abroad can sometimes be cliquish, huddling together to bemoan the absence of Denny sausages, Brennan's bread and Lyon's tea.

I love meeting Irish people here, but in the context of saying "we're abroad, so let's get on with it".

Pooled together in an Irish bar it is all too easy to get maudlin about the place.

I'd have cut me mickey off this morning for some Clonakilty black pudding, though.
Are you in Britain? I would imagine The Irish in Britain of an older generation than us can be a bit of a pain, but that would be due to the way they were treated there and here before they left!
 
Joined
Oct 8, 2011
Messages
39,553
Are you in Britain? I would imagine The Irish in Britain of an older generation than us can be a bit of a pain, but that would be due to the way they were treated there and here before they left!
France.
 

General Urko

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 24, 2012
Messages
15,680
I tend to avoid the Irish abroad - or at least in notably "Irish" venues. I didn't leave Ireland as a form of escape, but I've found on a consistent basis that the Irish abroad can sometimes be cliquish, huddling together to bemoan the absence of Denny sausages, Brennan's bread and Lyon's tea.

I love meeting Irish people here, but in the context of saying "we're abroad, so let's get on with it".

Pooled together in an Irish bar it is all too easy to get maudlin about the place.

I'd have cut me mickey off this morning for some Clonakilty black pudding, though.
As a heterosexual man, I don't know what mickeys taste like, and while I'm not a canibal either, I have heard, human meat tastes like pork, but psychologically, unless you bwere brought up on it, it will be repulsive to eat!:rolleyes:
Blood Sausage, hey!:p
 

General Urko

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 24, 2012
Messages
15,680
One should be allowed to set fire to anybody wearing a county jersey, abroad.
Does that include your own county or just rivals?:rolleyes:
I will keep stum about folkies wearing Mayo Jerseys anywhere!petunia
 

Deadlock

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 4, 2011
Messages
6,172
I tend to avoid the Irish abroad - or at least in notably "Irish" venues. I didn't leave Ireland as a form of escape, but I've found on a consistent basis that the Irish abroad can sometimes be cliquish, huddling together to bemoan the absence of Denny sausages, Brennan's bread and Lyon's tea.

I love meeting Irish people here, but in the context of saying "we're abroad, so let's get on with it".

Pooled together in an Irish bar it is all too easy to get maudlin about the place.

I'd have cut me mickey off this morning for some Clonakilty black pudding, though.
And the Lucozade, rashers and Cadburys chocolate. Dear God the Clon on baguettes with Camembert...

[video=youtube;b4SXpOFQ9T8]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b4SXpOFQ9T8[/video]

I found other Irish abroad in Europe pretty much as you would at home. I've travelled a fair bit throughout th EU studying living and working, and haven't found the cultures very different from ours, so homesickness wasn't an issue, at least when not listening to the song N17 from the Sawdoctors - Jesus that hit the feels.

In the US, Asia and Africa, maybe because of distance or time away from home, the nostalgia and homesickness, and yeah - the madness about 'home' grabs them hard and that's often hard to handle.
 

General Urko

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 24, 2012
Messages
15,680
BTW my experiences are based soley on travelling and living in Europe as I have never been outside it, but I have travelled all over practically!
 

Hunter-Gatherer

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 31, 2014
Messages
1,488
i have met and socialised with the irish in about 20 countries. The common denominator is that the irish drink more than the ambient natives.......having said that, i never mixed with the irish in Russia.
 

General Urko

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 24, 2012
Messages
15,680
i have met and socialised with the irish in about 20 countries. The common denominator is that the irish drink more than the ambient natives.......having said that, i never mixed with the irish in Russia.
So you weren't in Scotland then? Or Czech Republic?
 
Joined
Oct 8, 2011
Messages
39,553
BTW my experiences are based soley on travelling and living in Europe as I have never been outside it, but I have travelled all over practically!
I've lived and worked in four continents. The experience of meeting fellow Irish is consistent. I met one of the denizens of this board some time ago and that was an exception. They seemed to be like me - an emigrant who who was happily getting on with the task. I enjoyed that encounter greatly.
 

General Urko

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 24, 2012
Messages
15,680
I've lived and worked in four continents. The experience of meeting fellow Irish is consistent. I met one of the denizens of this board some time ago and that was an exception. They seemed to be like me - an emigrant who who was happily getting on with the task. I enjoyed that encounter greatly.
So you see clegiality there, sorry, I can't spell it!
 

mr_anderson

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 12, 2007
Messages
9,709
I avoid Irish bars like the plague.
Was in France some years back and an Irish family came up to me looking for directions to one.

I pretended to be French and not help them.
 

Deadlock

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 4, 2011
Messages
6,172
Are you in Britain? I would imagine The Irish in Britain of an older generation than us can be a bit of a pain, but that would be due to the way they were treated there and here before they left!
I once lived in a house in the UK owned by an elderly English woman landlord. She had lived in Co. Carlow between the ages of 7/8 and her early/mid twenties. It was often a shock to her to learn that times had moved on greatly. I imagine that would be reasonably typical for many Irish of her age group.
 

gerhard dengler

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 3, 2011
Messages
46,739
The Irish who I've met abroad are people who have settled and raised a family in their adopted country, or people who are living in their adopted countries but who are working on fixed term assignment and haven't "put down roots" in their adopted country.

For the first group, home is their adopted country.
For the second group (not put down roots), home is where they have come from.
That's my general impression.

In my experience the people in the first group, are usually very integrated in to their adopted country. I like listening to their views about their new home and their fellow citizens.

As I don't drink alcohol, I tend not to go to "Irish bars" when abroad.
 

Gin Soaked

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 25, 2016
Messages
4,030
As a heterosexual man, I don't know what mickeys taste like, and while I'm not a canibal either, I have heard, human meat tastes like pork, but psychologically, unless you bwere brought up on it, it will be repulsive to eat!:rolleyes:
Blood Sausage, hey!:p
If Des' langer looks like a black pudding, he should probably either see someone about it or enter the (ahem) "Adult" film industry....
 

Gin Soaked

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 25, 2016
Messages
4,030
I avoid Irish bars like the plague.
Was in France some years back and an Irish family came up to me looking for directions to one.

I pretended to be French and not help them.
Me too. At the bottom of the list of venues to visit.

And herself has a visceral aversion to any Irish people on hols.. does not improve much back here either....
 


New Threads

Popular Threads

Most Replies

Top