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How The Pasty Made Ulstermen Great

Irish-Rationalist

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The pasty is most associated with Cornwall. It is regarded as the national dish and accounts for 6% of the Cornish food economy. The traditional Cornish pasty has Protected Geographical Indication (PGI) status in Europe, is filled with beef, diced potato, swede and onion, seasoned with salt and pepper and baked in an oven.

In Norn Iron we eat a different type of pasty. A man's pasty. A pasty filled with potato, meat (optional and usually minimal at my local chippy), some onion and plenty more potato, then immersed in batter and cooked in vegetable oil in a deep fat fryer. Hardcore pasty eaters with a typical Ulsterman's contempt for heart health and general health and wellbeing use lard.

Respect.

The pasty has fed and (mal) nourished millions throughout Ulster, but it's within the 6 counties that the pasty gained its notoriety. It's common knowledge that when King William landed in Carrickfergus on 14 June 1690, he stopped off at the local chippy and ordered a pasty-bap and a portion of battered sausages, before making his way to the Boyne to kick seven shades of monarchical Brit out of his father-in-law King James II.

In fact, the entire Williamite Army feasted on pasty-baps, pasty suppers and all manner of pasty permutation, as did the Jacobite Army when they stopped off at the local chippy in Drogheda before making their way to the Boyne. Historicity never fails to remind us of the vastly superior quality of the Ulster pasty, and how it fulled the Williamite army onto victory.

That's right, the pasty is ultimately responsible for the formation of the Orange Order and the phenomenon of Unionist triumphalism. But it compensates for this by being delicious.

In contemporary 6 county Ulster the pasty is not consumed exclusively by the Unionist community. Feck no. The Fenian's enjoy a good pasty supper chippy feed too. The pasty has attained the capacity to transcend the religious, political and cultural divide, and is laudably viewed as Ulster cross-community cuisine. France gave the world fine wines, cheeses and surrender-monkeys. Ulster gave Ireland the pasty (some unfairly argue that this was worse than 800 years of British occupation, oppression and tyranny).



The pasty has also transcended the class divide. Health conscious middle class Ulster people have their pastys with side salad and a reduced fat dressing, and to compensate for the ridiculously high calorie and cholesterol content of the pasty. They then wash their pasties down with a fine Chardonnay or Cabernet sauvignon. The proles don't give a feck and just get mucked in, washing their's down with a luke-warm Buckie.

Respect.

On a night out some cosmopolitan people go in for Chinese, Indian, Italian or some other foreign muck. Ulstermen, nationalist and unionist, prod and taig, know what's good and collectively go in for the pasty. Pasty-baps, pasty suppers and pasties with battered sausages, they've brought Ulstermen of all political persuasion together for centuries, and of course it was pasties that the 36th Ulster Division and Irish Volunteers jointly dined out on before the Somme.

In retrospect, some have argued that this wasn't such a good idea.

Anyhoo, that's the true story of how the pasty (pasty-bap in particular) united Ulstermen i.e. Irishmen of all religion, class, culture and political creed, and made them great.

When we look back upon how the creator of the pasty bap (a young chip-shop employee from the heel and ankle called Seamus) saw the culinary ingenuity of taking the battered pasty and inserting it inside a freshly baked and sliced Belfast bap, we can only thank the people of the Shankill Road for providing such creative and prodigious progeny.

The irony, of course, is that if you tell all the above to young pasty loving Ulsterman (who are ignorant of their history) nowadays, they'll accuse you of making sh1t up. :roll:
 


TiredOfBeingTired

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Last edited:

vivabrigada

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Chippy Ar La.
 

raspberry tea

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A very stodgy recipie...Designed to kill someone,if you dont like em, feed em a pasty.. :) Kill with kindness , honestly a recipie for a heart attack, no way would i try that!
 

Irish-Rationalist

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A very stodgy recipie...Designed to kill someone,if you dont like em, feed em a pasty.. :) Kill with kindness , honestly a recipie for a heart attack, no way would i try that!
Not kidding, I lived on a steady diet of pasties and battered sausages as a kid. Me ma would make great, healthy, food; potatoes, chicken, loads of vegetables, and there was always plenty of fruit in the house. I'd turn my nose up at it and head off down to the chippy.

I'm in my forties now, and this past number of days I've been getting heart palpitations. :eek:
 

blinding

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I thought in was the "Pasty Faces"......I suppose they look that way after the heart attack....or even more so ! !
 

raspberry tea

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Not kidding, I lived on a steady diet of pasties and battered sausages as a kid. Me ma would make great, healthy, food; potatoes, chicken, loads of vegetables, and there was always plenty of fruit in the house. I'd turn my nose up at it and head off down to the chippy.

I'm in my forties now, and this past number of days I've been getting heart palpitations. :eek:
Heart problems are common in Ireland according to the medical profession,a lot of people within Irish families at least know one member from the family or extended who suffers from them - the good old fish n chips shouldn't even be eaten once a week,it should be once a month and a good hour long brisk walk afterwards....My gran died at 50 on my 2nd birthday from a heart attack...She ate a lot of roasts with homemade gravy made from pig suet(pig fat)...
 

Irish-Rationalist

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Heart problems are common in Ireland according to the medical profession,a lot of people within Irish families at least know one member from the family or extended who suffers from them - the good old fish n chips shouldn't even be eaten once a week,it should be once a month and a good hour long brisk walk afterwards....My gran died at 50 on my 2nd birthday from a heart attack...She ate a lot of roasts with homemade gravy made from pig suet(pig fat)...
I'm pretty certain I've developed a condition known as bradycardia (slow resting heart rate). It manifests as an arrhythmia i.e. irregular heartbeat. It has a number of causes, including coronary heart disease, but can also be caused by too much exercise. Been doing a lot of cycling recently, so hoping that taking a rest shall return heart rate to normal:

Bradycardia - slow heart rate
 

vivabrigada

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Another little discussed piece of our collective history is tapping. Tapping has a rich history in these Islands which survives to this day.
Initially thought to have been introduced to Britain by legendary Roman centurian Lendus Ascoreus, tapping people was already well established in Celtic culture.
Hadrian's wall was actually built to keep the maurading Phil McSporrans tribe at bay, such was his his ability to tap money and never pay it back.
The Romans gave Ireland a miss such was the ferocious reputation of high chieftain Owen O'Fortune for tapping.
It's lucky they didn't have access to pasties.
 

Irish-Rationalist

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Another little discussed piece of our collective history is tapping. Tapping has a rich history in these Islands which survives to this day.
Initially thought to have been introduced to Britain by legendary Roman centurian Lendus Ascoreus, tapping people was already well established in Celtic culture.
Hadrian's wall was actually built to keep the maurading Phil McSporrans tribe at bay, such was his his ability to tap money and never pay it back.
The Romans gave Ireland a miss such was the ferocious reputation of high chieftain Owen O'Fortune for tapping.
It's lucky they didn't have access to pasties.
Congrats on an informative and historically accurate post.

It should also be reminded to the right honourable gentlemen of the house, that the ancient High King of Leinster, Dermot Macmurrough, was a proper tapper who tapped ten bob off thon King Henry II of England, and to buy a pastie/pasty bap with red sauce whilst in attendance at a Glastonbury gig.

When MacMurrough failed to repay the ten bob (three and six in 11th century money), Henry took sour grapes and sent thon anglo-Normans over with a bumper book of pasty recipes, and thus began 800 years of English tyranny, oppression and coerced pasty eating.

This strategy to subjugate Gaelic Ulster by clogging Irish arteries has had limited success.
 

vivabrigada

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Congrats on an informative and historically accurate post.

It should also be reminded to the right honourable gentlemen of the house, that the ancient High King of Leinster, Dermot Macmurrough, was a proper tapper who tapped ten bob off thon King Henry II of England, and to buy a pastie/pasty bap with red sauce whilst in attendance at a Glastonbury gig.

When MacMurrough failed to repay the ten bob (three and six in 11th century money), Henry took sour grapes and sent thon anglo-Normans over with a bumper book of pasty recipes, and thus began 800 years of English tyranny, oppression and coerced pasty eating.

This strategy to subjugate Gaelic Ulster by clogging Irish arteries has had limited success.
Pasties and tapping, real culture, Any odds?
 

Irish-Rationalist

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Pasties and tapping, real culture, Any odds?
I've just given all my odds to NI winning Euro 2016:



The "For Cod and Ulster" chippy is just round the corner.
 

Irish-Rationalist

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The morning after the six pasty suppers the night before ...

 

Global Justice

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I've just given all my odds to NI winning Euro 2016:



The "For Cod and Ulster" chippy is just round the corner.
Am I right in thinking that loyalists also glorify in murals women beaters and drunks? (George Best and Alex Higgins)

I think I'm right.
 


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