how-the-troubles-impacted-ulster-football

McSlaggart

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""There's family to think about, there's the danger element. There's just not knowing what's going to happen next."

"From Down in 1968 until Down again in 1991, no Ulster team won the All-Ireland," Harte added.

"It's more than a coincidence that there was no great success during that period of time which very much coincided with the Troubles at their worst.

"I don't think that the people in the 'deep south', if we'll call it that, fully appreciated and didn't fully understand what exactly people in a GAA background had to endure, in many ways to keep the games alive up here. That people were killed over their connection with the GAA and that was the most tragic thing of all.""

https://www.independent.ie/sport/gaelic-games/gaelic-football/there-was-no-great-success-during-that-period-mickey-harte-on-how-the-troubles-impacted-ulster-football-36755456.html

During the troubles I have heard it said that different regiments of the British army treated Irish cultural events differently such as interacting with the supporters of the GAA. The UDR being at one end of the scale and some of the Welsh regiments on the other.

Today we still have unionist posters complaining about the GAA and all its works. One of the biggest complaints is that the GAA allows people who are republicans to hold republican events in GAA halls.

My question to this is on what grounds should the GAA turn down requests that are non party political for people to hold legal events in their facilities. Secondly would unionists like to see criteria defined applied across all cultural events in northern Ireland?
 


General Urko

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From the time of the opening up of Croker I have viewed The GAA as an immensely positive force in Southern Irish Society and combining with The IRFU in our albiet ill fated RWC 2023 bid was absolutely exemplary.
However THe Nordie Counties back in the day were the most frothing 'again the opening up Croker to world Games and that used to sicken my hole and reflected on them very much and their parochial fúcking Redneckism!:mad:
Also what about the sectarian abuse Peter Whitnell and his family faced and the puke footbrawl that Nordie Counties have mastered!
And ye are rubbish at the most significant game - hurling!
Mind you, I generally find Brolly, an impressive character!
 

McSlaggart

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However THe Nordie Counties back in the day were the most frothing 'again the opening up Croker to world Games and that used to sicken my hole and reflected on them very much and their parochial fúcking Redneckism!:mad:
I would agree the people that lived though the troubles are bound to have a different perspective on the opening of their main stadium. You may not have liked it but such is life.
 

PBP voter

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Puke football
 

McSlaggart

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And ye are rubbish at the most significant game - hurling!
I do not think any of the nine counties in Ulster are great at Hurling. In counties such as Tyrone their has recently been a lot of effort put into Hurling and some day it may succeed. You are missing the point the idea of sport and the GAA is/should be more about getting people active and having fun.

It will be a long time before Tyrone becomes a joint hurling/football county but the first steps are currently being taken.
 

General Urko

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I would agree the people that lived though the troubles are bound to have a different perspective on the opening of their main stadium. You may not have liked it but such is life.
Is it not more a reflection of a redneck attitude from them than any of the trevails they were put through?
 

between the bridges

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I doubt that the families of the 3k dead or 60k maimed care how the troubles effected the ability to slap balls...
 

General Urko

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I doubt that the families of the 3k dead or 60k maimed care how the troubles effected the ability to slap balls...
60K maimed, I didn't realize that was so high!
I take the view a plague on both your houses re the respective sides of the community, each ultimately as bad as each other!
 

CastleRay

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60K maimed, I didn't realize that was so high!
I take the view a plague on both your houses re the respective sides of the community, each ultimately as bad as each other!
Injured people would be well in excess of 60k I would have thought and that’s before the mental health issues of others not directly injured.
 

Northsideman

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I doubt that the families of the 3k dead or 60k maimed care how the troubles effected the ability to slap balls...
Only some of those were killed and maimed because of their involvement in the games and for no other reason whatsoever.
 
Last edited:

McSlaggart

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the puke footbrawl that Nordie Counties have mastered!
For years Tyrone used to play all nice and be gratefully for being in the competition. ........ if you do not like puke football take it up with Meath....

"IT'S the itch that has to be scratched and the stone that must be removed from the shoe.

Tyrone insist that Saturday's All-Ireland quarter-final clash with Meath is just another big game but, in truth, it holds a much deeper significance in the psyche of a county that has, over the past five years, beaten such major Championship forces as Kerry, Dublin, Galway and Armagh.

That quartet has, between them, won eight All-Ireland titles in the past 12 years with Tyrone taking two others.

That leaves the remaining two, with Meath the one county that Tyrone badly wants to feel the force of their Red Hand in Croke Park.

It all goes back to 1996, a year in which Tyrone arrived in the All-Ireland semi-final as hot favourites to beat Meath.

However, it turned into a disastrous day for the Ulster champions who not only lost by nine points but who left with a feeling that they had been mugged into submission.

Sulphur

A touch melodramatic perhaps but the smell of sulphur took hours to lift after the game. On the following day, the airwaves crackled as reaction to what had been a rather fiery encounter engaged the sporting nation.

"We will have to be much more mean-spirited when we play in Croke Park again," remarked Tyrone joint-manager Eugene McKenna in a reference to what he clearly deemed to have been an over-physical approach by Meath.

Later on 'Liveline', Colm O'Rourke and Tyrone corner-forward Ciarán McBride debated the previous day's events from different sides of a divide that drew enraged comments from Tyrone supporters ("Meath are deranged bully boys") and gentle jibes from Meath ("take your beating and stop moaning").

Tyrone's anger arose from, among other things, the circumstances in which Brian Dooher sustained a head injury.

Tyrone alleged that Martin O'Connell stood on him while Meath insisted it was an accident.

O'Connell also protested his innocence, stating that while it might have looked bad on TV, he had always kept his eye on the ball as he chased after it.

His excellent record as a sportsman helped his defence but Tyrone remained furious. They also claimed that McBride had been 'done'. Most of all, they insisted that Peter Canavan, as ever a key man in the Tyrone attack, was taken out in a late tackle just 10 minutes into the game at a time when his side were two points clear and motoring nicely.

It was certainly a borderline challenge, the legality of which was debated for ages. Canavan got his shot away while being tackled by Mark O'Reilly but was met by a thundering shoulder from John McDermott.

Powered

Canavan, who was off balance when he took the hit, injured his ankle and while he stayed on, he made little contribution from there on as Meath powered from strength to strength to win by 2-15 to 0-12, with Graham Geraghty scoring 1-4.

Canavan wasn't fit to play again until 1997. Two weeks before Christmas 1996, I interviewed Canavan and in the course of his recollections of the semi-final, he made a number of points which, as the years passed, suggested that the clash with Meath was a turning point in Tyrone's understanding of what it took to win an All-Ireland title.

"Meath won the All-Ireland, we lost the semi-final - that's what the year shows. We were too disciplined against Meath. If we had to do it again with the same referee (Michael Curley), we definitely wouldn't be as disciplined," recalled Canavan.

"What we didn't expect was that there would be a different interpretation of the rules than there was in Ulster. I got sent off for two harmless fouls against Derry and I doubt very much if either of them would have earned a booking against Meath."

Tyrone slipped down the pecking order in Ulster after that and it was seven years before they won their first All-Ireland title but there are many who believe that the lessons learned against Meath in 1996 led to a re-alignment of the county's philosophy for when they next had title contenders.

Certainly, nobody would ever suggest that Tyrone come up short in the physical stakes these days, while Meath have always retained their hard edge so it remains to be seen what will happen when two powerful planets collide on Saturday. Tyrone go into the game as hot favourites and with far more experience at this level but will still be deeply aware of the Royal tradition, especially once it heads for Croke Park in August.

Manager Colm Coyle was at right half-back in the 1996 semi-final while Darren Fay and Geraghty are Meath survivors on the playing side.

While both are carrying

injuries, Dooher and Ger

Cavlan are still aboard for Tyrone, but of even more significance is the symbolism that game created.

It underlined Meath's capacity to impose themselves physically on a game while still playing superb football, a formula that has been very much at the heart of Tyrone under Mickey Harte. What happened 11 years ago won't decide the outcome of Saturday's game but there's no question that both sets of supporters still have clear memories of the 1996 semi-final."

https://www.independent.ie/sport/gaelic-football/how-meath-taught-tyrone-the-hard-way-to-win-sam-26308686.html
 

General Urko

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Injured people would be well in excess of 60k I would have thought and that’s before the mental health issues of others not directly injured.
And imagine having a UI bringing in people with those PTSS mental health issues on top of us and that's before the massive subsidies, upping of their sizeable PS sector's wages, perks and pensions and obvious security issues!
 

General Urko

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Messages
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For years Tyrone used to play all nice and be gratefully for being in the competition. ........ if you do not like puke football take it up with Meath....

"IT'S the itch that has to be scratched and the stone that must be removed from the shoe.

Tyrone insist that Saturday's All-Ireland quarter-final clash with Meath is just another big game but, in truth, it holds a much deeper significance in the psyche of a county that has, over the past five years, beaten such major Championship forces as Kerry, Dublin, Galway and Armagh.

That quartet has, between them, won eight All-Ireland titles in the past 12 years with Tyrone taking two others.

That leaves the remaining two, with Meath the one county that Tyrone badly wants to feel the force of their Red Hand in Croke Park.

It all goes back to 1996, a year in which Tyrone arrived in the All-Ireland semi-final as hot favourites to beat Meath.

However, it turned into a disastrous day for the Ulster champions who not only lost by nine points but who left with a feeling that they had been mugged into submission.

Sulphur

A touch melodramatic perhaps but the smell of sulphur took hours to lift after the game. On the following day, the airwaves crackled as reaction to what had been a rather fiery encounter engaged the sporting nation.

"We will have to be much more mean-spirited when we play in Croke Park again," remarked Tyrone joint-manager Eugene McKenna in a reference to what he clearly deemed to have been an over-physical approach by Meath.

Later on 'Liveline', Colm O'Rourke and Tyrone corner-forward Ciarán McBride debated the previous day's events from different sides of a divide that drew enraged comments from Tyrone supporters ("Meath are deranged bully boys") and gentle jibes from Meath ("take your beating and stop moaning").

Tyrone's anger arose from, among other things, the circumstances in which Brian Dooher sustained a head injury.

Tyrone alleged that Martin O'Connell stood on him while Meath insisted it was an accident.

O'Connell also protested his innocence, stating that while it might have looked bad on TV, he had always kept his eye on the ball as he chased after it.

His excellent record as a sportsman helped his defence but Tyrone remained furious. They also claimed that McBride had been 'done'. Most of all, they insisted that Peter Canavan, as ever a key man in the Tyrone attack, was taken out in a late tackle just 10 minutes into the game at a time when his side were two points clear and motoring nicely.

It was certainly a borderline challenge, the legality of which was debated for ages. Canavan got his shot away while being tackled by Mark O'Reilly but was met by a thundering shoulder from John McDermott.

Powered

Canavan, who was off balance when he took the hit, injured his ankle and while he stayed on, he made little contribution from there on as Meath powered from strength to strength to win by 2-15 to 0-12, with Graham Geraghty scoring 1-4.

Canavan wasn't fit to play again until 1997. Two weeks before Christmas 1996, I interviewed Canavan and in the course of his recollections of the semi-final, he made a number of points which, as the years passed, suggested that the clash with Meath was a turning point in Tyrone's understanding of what it took to win an All-Ireland title.

"Meath won the All-Ireland, we lost the semi-final - that's what the year shows. We were too disciplined against Meath. If we had to do it again with the same referee (Michael Curley), we definitely wouldn't be as disciplined," recalled Canavan.

"What we didn't expect was that there would be a different interpretation of the rules than there was in Ulster. I got sent off for two harmless fouls against Derry and I doubt very much if either of them would have earned a booking against Meath."

Tyrone slipped down the pecking order in Ulster after that and it was seven years before they won their first All-Ireland title but there are many who believe that the lessons learned against Meath in 1996 led to a re-alignment of the county's philosophy for when they next had title contenders.

Certainly, nobody would ever suggest that Tyrone come up short in the physical stakes these days, while Meath have always retained their hard edge so it remains to be seen what will happen when two powerful planets collide on Saturday. Tyrone go into the game as hot favourites and with far more experience at this level but will still be deeply aware of the Royal tradition, especially once it heads for Croke Park in August.

Manager Colm Coyle was at right half-back in the 1996 semi-final while Darren Fay and Geraghty are Meath survivors on the playing side.

While both are carrying

injuries, Dooher and Ger

Cavlan are still aboard for Tyrone, but of even more significance is the symbolism that game created.

It underlined Meath's capacity to impose themselves physically on a game while still playing superb football, a formula that has been very much at the heart of Tyrone under Mickey Harte. What happened 11 years ago won't decide the outcome of Saturday's game but there's no question that both sets of supporters still have clear memories of the 1996 semi-final."

https://www.independent.ie/sport/gaelic-football/how-meath-taught-tyrone-the-hard-way-to-win-sam-26308686.html
To me Puke Footbrawl started with the game of shame The Jacks thuggery against Galway in The '83 final and they lost me forever at that point! A redneck's game for Rednecks!
 

McSlaggart

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Is it not more a reflection of a redneck attitude from them than any of the trevails they were put through?
Nationalists in Tyrone who are from "redneck" backgrounds tend also to be very well educated to University level.
 

McSlaggart

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To me Puke Footbrawl started with the game of shame The Jacks thuggery against Galway in The '83 final and they lost me forever at that point! A redneck's game for Rednecks!
If you do not like the game grand. Some of the current Tyrone squad have some talent.
[video=youtube;fnFNEBUDAxI]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fnFNEBUDAxI[/video]
 

redneck

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To me Puke Footbrawl started with the game of shame The Jacks thuggery against Galway in The '83 final and they lost me forever at that point! A redneck's game for Rednecks!
Yes it is true that Redneck likes GAA. It is a superior game to Rugby imho.
 

AhNowStop

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And imagine having a UI bringing in people with those PTSS mental health issues on top of us and that's before the massive subsidies, upping of their sizeable PS sector's wages, perks and pensions and obvious security issues!
Feck right enough :?, I’d imagine the HSE would need all it’s current resources just to keep a lid on septic headed lunatics like yourself :roll:
 


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