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How would a President Hillary Clinton govern?

NYCKY

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Apr 17, 2010
Messages
13,047
If Hillary Clinton is elected President, she will likely be the first Democratic President since Grover Cleveland (elected in 1884) to assume office without her party having control of BOTH house of Congress.

GOP plots early wake-up call for Clinton - POLITICO

As things stand, with two months until the election, she has a commanding if fragile lead in the polls; the House is likely to stay in GOP control and the Senate is less certain. Currently the RCP polling average puts the Senate balance at 50/50 which in a Clinton administration would leave a Vice President Kaine as the tie breaker.

Should Kaine assume the Vice Presidency, Virginia Democratic Governor Terry McAuliffe would appoint his successor, but for only one year, with a special election to be held in 2017. Virginia is one of a handful of states that have off year elections, and many of the statewide offices are up in 2017, including Governor, Lieutenant Governor and Attorney General.
With some help from gerrymandering, only 3 of the 11 Virginia congressional districts are held by Democrats and so the bench of appointees is pretty thin but in a special Senate election, that could decide control of the Senate, we could expect the mother of all battles in that particular Senate race with no thought to national governance.

In any event, even if the Democrats retake the Senate this year and hold the Virginia Senate seat in 2017, the map is so hostile to Democrats in 2018 that they would be very likely to lose it. After a potential 10 years of a Democratic President, there are a number of red state Democrats up in 2018, like Heidi Heitkamp in North Dakota, Claire McCaskill in Missouri, Joe Donnelly in Indiana, Joe Manchin in West Virginia, Jon Tester in Montana as well as a host of Democrats up in purple states that could be in trouble. All of these Senators will be casting votes with one eye on reelection in 2018. The only GOP Senator up in a purple state in 2018 is Dean Heller in Nevada and he held his seat in 2012 even as Obama won the state. Essentially, even if the GOP lose the Senate this year, they will very likely take it back two years from now.

When President Obama took office, it was anticipated that he would get between 3-5 Supreme Court appointees over two terms; he got three (with one unfilled). Hillary would start with the Scalia vacancy and could very well end up filling the spots of Ginsburg who is 83 and Breyer who is 80 in just one term. That leaves out any other resignations, retirements or deaths. (Kennedy a Reagan appointee and swing vote is 80).

The reality is that she will need the GOP to help her govern if she is to achieve anything. The GOP have never been fond of her and her comments in one of the first debates won’t have done much to endear them to her.

Democratic debate: Which enemy are you most proud of? - CBS News

Hillary Clinton: Well, in addition to the NRA, the health insurance companies, the drug companies, the Iranians. Probably the Republicans.
As a former Senator she could expect some comity from her former colleagues (in the Senate, a body noted for its comity, only two Senators voted against her confirmation as SoS, Jim DeMint and David Vitter, neither of which would be around next year) but with the recent wave elections, the turnover has been unusually high and she won’t have served with more than half of them, and that will be reduced further with more turnover this November.

She has embraced Obama and his agenda in an appeal for his voters, but the GOP never warmed to the Obama agenda and after suffering a third stinging defeat for the White House will unlikely be amenable to her agenda.

Bernie Sanders in his quixotic bid for the Presidency forced Hillary to the left but will she be forced to move back toward the center if she is to have any hope of getting anything achieved.

How could a President Hillary Clinton get the other side on her side?
 


PC Principle

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Joined
Jul 12, 2016
Messages
4,828
If Hillary Clinton is elected President, she will likely be the first Democratic President since Grover Cleveland (elected in 1884) to assume office without her party having control of BOTH house of Congress.

GOP plots early wake-up call for Clinton - POLITICO

As things stand, with two months until the election, she has a commanding if fragile lead in the polls; the House is likely to stay in GOP control and the Senate is less certain. Currently the RCP polling average puts the Senate balance at 50/50 which in a Clinton administration would leave a Vice President Kaine as the tie breaker.

Should Kaine assume the Vice Presidency, Virginia Democratic Governor Terry McAuliffe would appoint his successor, but for only one year, with a special election to be held in 2017. Virginia is one of a handful of states that have off year elections, and many of the statewide offices are up in 2017, including Governor, Lieutenant Governor and Attorney General.
With some help from gerrymandering, only 3 of the 11 Virginia congressional districts are held by Democrats and so the bench of appointees is pretty thin but in a special Senate election, that could decide control of the Senate, we could expect the mother of all battles in that particular Senate race with no thought to national governance.

In any event, even if the Democrats retake the Senate this year and hold the Virginia Senate seat in 2017, the map is so hostile to Democrats in 2018 that they would be very likely to lose it. After a potential 10 years of a Democratic President, there are a number of red state Democrats up in 2018, like Heidi Heitkamp in North Dakota, Claire McCaskill in Missouri, Joe Donnelly in Indiana, Joe Manchin in West Virginia, Jon Tester in Montana as well as a host of Democrats up in purple states that could be in trouble. All of these Senators will be casting votes with one eye on reelection in 2018. The only GOP Senator up in a purple state in 2018 is Dean Heller in Nevada and he held his seat in 2012 even as Obama won the state. Essentially, even if the GOP lose the Senate this year, they will very likely take it back two years from now.

When President Obama took office, it was anticipated that he would get between 3-5 Supreme Court appointees over two terms; he got three (with one unfilled). Hillary would start with the Scalia vacancy and could very well end up filling the spots of Ginsburg who is 83 and Breyer who is 80 in just one term. That leaves out any other resignations, retirements or deaths. (Kennedy a Reagan appointee and swing vote is 80).

The reality is that she will need the GOP to help her govern if she is to achieve anything. The GOP have never been fond of her and her comments in one of the first debates won’t have done much to endear them to her.

Democratic debate: Which enemy are you most proud of? - CBS News



As a former Senator she could expect some comity from her former colleagues (in the Senate, a body noted for its comity, only two Senators voted against her confirmation as SoS, Jim DeMint and David Vitter, neither of which would be around next year) but with the recent wave elections, the turnover has been unusually high and she won’t have served with more than half of them, and that will be reduced further with more turnover this November.

She has embraced Obama and his agenda in an appeal for his voters, but the GOP never warmed to the Obama agenda and after suffering a third stinging defeat for the White House will unlikely be amenable to her agenda.

Bernie Sanders in his quixotic bid for the Presidency forced Hillary to the left but will she be forced to move back toward the center if she is to have any hope of getting anything achieved.

How could a President Hillary Clinton get the other side on her side?
In the best interests of her slush fund. Only and always.
 

statsman

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 25, 2011
Messages
55,059
If Hillary Clinton is elected President, she will likely be the first Democratic President since Grover Cleveland (elected in 1884) to assume office without her party having control of BOTH house of Congress.

GOP plots early wake-up call for Clinton - POLITICO

As things stand, with two months until the election, she has a commanding if fragile lead in the polls; the House is likely to stay in GOP control and the Senate is less certain. Currently the RCP polling average puts the Senate balance at 50/50 which in a Clinton administration would leave a Vice President Kaine as the tie breaker.

Should Kaine assume the Vice Presidency, Virginia Democratic Governor Terry McAuliffe would appoint his successor, but for only one year, with a special election to be held in 2017. Virginia is one of a handful of states that have off year elections, and many of the statewide offices are up in 2017, including Governor, Lieutenant Governor and Attorney General.
With some help from gerrymandering, only 3 of the 11 Virginia congressional districts are held by Democrats and so the bench of appointees is pretty thin but in a special Senate election, that could decide control of the Senate, we could expect the mother of all battles in that particular Senate race with no thought to national governance.

In any event, even if the Democrats retake the Senate this year and hold the Virginia Senate seat in 2017, the map is so hostile to Democrats in 2018 that they would be very likely to lose it. After a potential 10 years of a Democratic President, there are a number of red state Democrats up in 2018, like Heidi Heitkamp in North Dakota, Claire McCaskill in Missouri, Joe Donnelly in Indiana, Joe Manchin in West Virginia, Jon Tester in Montana as well as a host of Democrats up in purple states that could be in trouble. All of these Senators will be casting votes with one eye on reelection in 2018. The only GOP Senator up in a purple state in 2018 is Dean Heller in Nevada and he held his seat in 2012 even as Obama won the state. Essentially, even if the GOP lose the Senate this year, they will very likely take it back two years from now.

When President Obama took office, it was anticipated that he would get between 3-5 Supreme Court appointees over two terms; he got three (with one unfilled). Hillary would start with the Scalia vacancy and could very well end up filling the spots of Ginsburg who is 83 and Breyer who is 80 in just one term. That leaves out any other resignations, retirements or deaths. (Kennedy a Reagan appointee and swing vote is 80).

The reality is that she will need the GOP to help her govern if she is to achieve anything. The GOP have never been fond of her and her comments in one of the first debates won’t have done much to endear them to her.

Democratic debate: Which enemy are you most proud of? - CBS News



As a former Senator she could expect some comity from her former colleagues (in the Senate, a body noted for its comity, only two Senators voted against her confirmation as SoS, Jim DeMint and David Vitter, neither of which would be around next year) but with the recent wave elections, the turnover has been unusually high and she won’t have served with more than half of them, and that will be reduced further with more turnover this November.

She has embraced Obama and his agenda in an appeal for his voters, but the GOP never warmed to the Obama agenda and after suffering a third stinging defeat for the White House will unlikely be amenable to her agenda.

Bernie Sanders in his quixotic bid for the Presidency forced Hillary to the left but will she be forced to move back toward the center if she is to have any hope of getting anything achieved.

How could a President Hillary Clinton get the other side on her side?
Like so many before her, badly and hogtied by the House.
 

Lúidín

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 14, 2013
Messages
7,253
She would do as she's told by the financial-military owners of the US, as all previous presidents have done - or be 'taken out' as they say.
 

GDPR

1
Joined
Jul 5, 2008
Messages
217,847
How could a President Hillary Clinton get the other side on her side?
She could go around with a permanent cap reading "At least I'm not Donald"
It's just about the only positive thing she could have to say for herself.
 

ergo2

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Joined
Oct 4, 2008
Messages
14,034
Clinton will be a better, saner and more sensible president than Trump
 

Congalltee

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Joined
Nov 10, 2009
Messages
6,124
Unimpended right wing economically, while distracting the masses with constant rows over social issues and a good war.
 

owedtojoy

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 27, 2010
Messages
46,374
If Hillary Clinton is elected President, she will likely be the first Democratic President since Grover Cleveland (elected in 1884) to assume office without her party having control of BOTH house of Congress.

GOP plots early wake-up call for Clinton - POLITICO

As things stand, with two months until the election, she has a commanding if fragile lead in the polls; the House is likely to stay in GOP control and the Senate is less certain. Currently the RCP polling average puts the Senate balance at 50/50 which in a Clinton administration would leave a Vice President Kaine as the tie breaker.

Should Kaine assume the Vice Presidency, Virginia Democratic Governor Terry McAuliffe would appoint his successor, but for only one year, with a special election to be held in 2017. Virginia is one of a handful of states that have off year elections, and many of the statewide offices are up in 2017, including Governor, Lieutenant Governor and Attorney General.
With some help from gerrymandering, only 3 of the 11 Virginia congressional districts are held by Democrats and so the bench of appointees is pretty thin but in a special Senate election, that could decide control of the Senate, we could expect the mother of all battles in that particular Senate race with no thought to national governance.

In any event, even if the Democrats retake the Senate this year and hold the Virginia Senate seat in 2017, the map is so hostile to Democrats in 2018 that they would be very likely to lose it. After a potential 10 years of a Democratic President, there are a number of red state Democrats up in 2018, like Heidi Heitkamp in North Dakota, Claire McCaskill in Missouri, Joe Donnelly in Indiana, Joe Manchin in West Virginia, Jon Tester in Montana as well as a host of Democrats up in purple states that could be in trouble. All of these Senators will be casting votes with one eye on reelection in 2018. The only GOP Senator up in a purple state in 2018 is Dean Heller in Nevada and he held his seat in 2012 even as Obama won the state. Essentially, even if the GOP lose the Senate this year, they will very likely take it back two years from now.

When President Obama took office, it was anticipated that he would get between 3-5 Supreme Court appointees over two terms; he got three (with one unfilled). Hillary would start with the Scalia vacancy and could very well end up filling the spots of Ginsburg who is 83 and Breyer who is 80 in just one term. That leaves out any other resignations, retirements or deaths. (Kennedy a Reagan appointee and swing vote is 80).

The reality is that she will need the GOP to help her govern if she is to achieve anything. The GOP have never been fond of her and her comments in one of the first debates won’t have done much to endear them to her.

Democratic debate: Which enemy are you most proud of? - CBS News



As a former Senator she could expect some comity from her former colleagues (in the Senate, a body noted for its comity, only two Senators voted against her confirmation as SoS, Jim DeMint and David Vitter, neither of which would be around next year) but with the recent wave elections, the turnover has been unusually high and she won’t have served with more than half of them, and that will be reduced further with more turnover this November.

She has embraced Obama and his agenda in an appeal for his voters, but the GOP never warmed to the Obama agenda and after suffering a third stinging defeat for the White House will unlikely be amenable to her agenda.

Bernie Sanders in his quixotic bid for the Presidency forced Hillary to the left but will she be forced to move back toward the center if she is to have any hope of getting anything achieved.

How could a President Hillary Clinton get the other side on her side?
Unless you adore a bloated misogynist, Hillary Clinton is the least worst President. on offer

American Presidents work jointly with Congress, so it is unclear what the full line-up will be.

In any event, she will continue President Obama's policies on health, climate and energy, even if they have to be by Presidential decree only. That is because a Republican Congress will refuse to compromise on what its Big Oil donors and climate change deniers tell it to do.

In foreign policy, she will continue with the Obama-Kerry foreign policy, with little change. At the moment, there is no other game in town, unless you take seriously Trump's insane "Let's f*ck our friends, and help our enemies" gambit.

I expect Clinton to be mainly a domestic President - appointing Supreme Court Justices that might overthrow the Citizen's United decision, which makes politicians donor dependent. Republicans lie about being against big money in politics - Trump has appointed a Citizen's United activist to his staff.

Otherwise, it will be a battle about taxes, budgets, insane Government shut-downs and threats to renege on US debts by inept Congressmen wagging their tales and hoping the big right-wing donors notice.
 

Fractional Reserve

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 30, 2011
Messages
8,158
I hope I'm wrong, but I fear she will go down the same road as Golda Meir, Indira Gandhi and Margaret Thatcher, and find a war which will show her to be equal to any man, maybe even better.
Yeap she will have to prove that she is stronger and bolder than any man which will be dangerous .
 

firefly123

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 8, 2009
Messages
27,912
If Hillary Clinton is elected President, she will likely be the first Democratic President since Grover Cleveland (elected in 1884) to assume office without her party having control of BOTH house of Congress.

GOP plots early wake-up call for Clinton - POLITICO

As things stand, with two months until the election, she has a commanding if fragile lead in the polls; the House is likely to stay in GOP control and the Senate is less certain. Currently the RCP polling average puts the Senate balance at 50/50 which in a Clinton administration would leave a Vice President Kaine as the tie breaker.

Should Kaine assume the Vice Presidency, Virginia Democratic Governor Terry McAuliffe would appoint his successor, but for only one year, with a special election to be held in 2017. Virginia is one of a handful of states that have off year elections, and many of the statewide offices are up in 2017, including Governor, Lieutenant Governor and Attorney General.
With some help from gerrymandering, only 3 of the 11 Virginia congressional districts are held by Democrats and so the bench of appointees is pretty thin but in a special Senate election, that could decide control of the Senate, we could expect the mother of all battles in that particular Senate race with no thought to national governance.

In any event, even if the Democrats retake the Senate this year and hold the Virginia Senate seat in 2017, the map is so hostile to Democrats in 2018 that they would be very likely to lose it. After a potential 10 years of a Democratic President, there are a number of red state Democrats up in 2018, like Heidi Heitkamp in North Dakota, Claire McCaskill in Missouri, Joe Donnelly in Indiana, Joe Manchin in West Virginia, Jon Tester in Montana as well as a host of Democrats up in purple states that could be in trouble. All of these Senators will be casting votes with one eye on reelection in 2018. The only GOP Senator up in a purple state in 2018 is Dean Heller in Nevada and he held his seat in 2012 even as Obama won the state. Essentially, even if the GOP lose the Senate this year, they will very likely take it back two years from now.

When President Obama took office, it was anticipated that he would get between 3-5 Supreme Court appointees over two terms; he got three (with one unfilled). Hillary would start with the Scalia vacancy and could very well end up filling the spots of Ginsburg who is 83 and Breyer who is 80 in just one term. That leaves out any other resignations, retirements or deaths. (Kennedy a Reagan appointee and swing vote is 80).

The reality is that she will need the GOP to help her govern if she is to achieve anything. The GOP have never been fond of her and her comments in one of the first debates won’t have done much to endear them to her.

Democratic debate: Which enemy are you most proud of? - CBS News



As a former Senator she could expect some comity from her former colleagues (in the Senate, a body noted for its comity, only two Senators voted against her confirmation as SoS, Jim DeMint and David Vitter, neither of which would be around next year) but with the recent wave elections, the turnover has been unusually high and she won’t have served with more than half of them, and that will be reduced further with more turnover this November.

She has embraced Obama and his agenda in an appeal for his voters, but the GOP never warmed to the Obama agenda and after suffering a third stinging defeat for the White House will unlikely be amenable to her agenda.

Bernie Sanders in his quixotic bid for the Presidency forced Hillary to the left but will she be forced to move back toward the center if she is to have any hope of getting anything achieved.

How could a President Hillary Clinton get the other side on her side?
God. A decent post about the US election at last. Nice one NYCKY.
 

firefly123

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 8, 2009
Messages
27,912
Clinton will be a better, saner and more sensible president than Trump
A potato would be a better, saner and more sensible President than Trump.
 

nomahdi

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Joined
May 17, 2013
Messages
2,593
Look all around you.

She already governed the US for 8 years in the 90s and for 4 years untrammeled under Obama, not to mention 8 years as senator of the most influential state in the most powerful country in the world ...

How would she govern? Look all around you.
 

stopdoingstuff

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Joined
Feb 26, 2011
Messages
22,377
She will govern like a member of her class i.e. fk the poor, bomb civilians, transfer trillions of dollars to those who funded her, print more money, borrow more, restrict people's liberties, demonstrate the strategic awareness of Jessica Simpson, and continue to divide her country at home and erode its prestige abroad.
 

Ruadh

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Joined
Aug 18, 2015
Messages
2,491
Unless you adore a bloated misogynist, Hillary Clinton is the least worst President. on offer

American Presidents work jointly with Congress, so it is unclear what the full line-up will be.

In any event, she will continue President Obama's policies on health, climate and energy, even if they have to be by Presidential decree only. That is because a Republican Congress will refuse to compromise on what its Big Oil donors and climate change deniers tell it to do.

In foreign policy, she will continue with the Obama-Kerry foreign policy, with little change. At the moment, there is no other game in town, unless you take seriously Trump's insane "Let's f*ck our friends, and help our enemies" gambit.

I expect Clinton to be mainly a domestic President - appointing Supreme Court Justices that might overthrow the Citizen's United decision, which makes politicians donor dependent. Republicans lie about being against big money in politics - Trump has appointed a Citizen's United activist to his staff.

Otherwise, it will be a battle about taxes, budgets, insane Government shut-downs and threats to renege on US debts by inept Congressmen wagging their tales and hoping the big right-wing donors notice.
She will be better than Trump in that she is sane, and not likely to change her mind 4 times on the way to situation room.

But she is a neo liberals neo liberal and will not challenge inequality in a meaningful way or reel in the US's illegal wars.

Better than Trump but then so would anyone.
 

Trainwreck

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Joined
Sep 6, 2012
Messages
26,416
She will be better than Trump in that she is sane, and not likely to change her mind 4 times on the way to situation room.

But she is a neo liberals neo liberal and will not challenge inequality in a meaningful way or reel in the US's illegal wars.

Better than Trump but then so would anyone.
So you want someone who doesn't change their mind about things.

Interesting...
 


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