Huge gap in how employees across economy have fared since crash ( based on CSO )

robut

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Revealed: The huge gap in how workers have fared financially since crash - INDEPENDENT

Some workers are 42pc better off since the beginning of the recession, new research has found.

Figures compiled by the Irish Independent reveal a huge variation in how employees across the economy have fared financially since the economy went belly-up. While some staff have seen a significant rise in their pay of as much as 42pc, others suffered a massive 24pc drop in earnings.




They are compiled from a Central Statistics Office database that gives the most detailed information on earnings available, although it does not distinguish between the roles held.
Good to have the figures. May also show how many who are in the winners section cannot understand others not so lucky when they mention they havent seen the recovery yet and might wonder will they ever?
 


Sync

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Employer, pro groups and unions seems a very broad spectrum.
 

Prester Jim

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Interesting that so many of the "losers" are in the public sector that we have been told repeatedly by some mouth-breathers on pie (and against the evidence) is bloated and overpaid.*
Interesting also that so many of the unionised sectors did worst out of the recession.
Not much of a suprise in other areas; employment agencies will lose money when there are no jobs to draw lifeblood off of and civil engineering and construction...

*(maybe that will get the loons to engage with the thread as they have shown fup all interest over the last 2 hours because it didn't confirm their beliefs.)
 

fat finger

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Petrol manufacturing as a category seems odd. There is one refinery in the country which means this category is all about the employees of one company. The broader performance of the economy aside, if petrol manufacturing as a category also includes contractors to the refinery, their income would have slumped with the oil price in the time range given. Thus we can conclude that based on one category alone, the above official figures are entirely bogus, entirely meaningless, but hey what's new
 

Fritzbox

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Petrol manufacturing as a category seems odd. There is one refinery in the country which means this category is all about the employees of one company. The broader performance of the economy aside, if petrol manufacturing as a category also includes contractors to the refinery, their income would have slumped with the oil price in the time range given. Thus we can conclude that based on one category alone, the above official figures are entirely bogus, entirely meaningless, but hey what's new
I would concur with your assessment:

It seems to be the Irish Independent's own in-house research - a huge productive mill of statistical analysis, have no doubts about it...:rolleyes:
 

Uganda

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Interesting that so many of the "losers" are in the public sector that we have been told repeatedly by some mouth-breathers on pie (and against the evidence) is bloated and overpaid.*
Interesting also that so many of the unionised sectors did worst out of the recession.
Not much of a suprise in other areas; employment agencies will lose money when there are no jobs to draw lifeblood off of and civil engineering and construction...

*(maybe that will get the loons to engage with the thread as they have shown fup all interest over the last 2 hours because it didn't confirm their beliefs.)
Interesting also that the ps is almost the highest paid in the "losers" list, and higher than half those in the "winners".

The fact that the ps may have become slightly less bloated doesn't mean it isn't bloated.

But I'm sure we will be hearing shortly about ps workers who have to eat cardboard for their dinner, and from teachers who regard having to work 6 extra minutes a day (a week?) as hell on earth.
 

Dame_Enda

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It underlines how tiny a percentage those on €71000 a year who benefitted from FG's tax cuts in their first term are and why they werent thanked for them.

Regarding pharmaceutical industry - that is sortof an example of inelastic demand which is less dependent on economic downturns.
 

irish_bob

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the construction guys are back charging every bit as much as they were during the boom for the simple reason you cannot get one to do anything at the moment

electricians , plumbers , carpenters , all are charging about four hundred euro a day at the moment
 


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