• It has come to our attention that some users may have been "banned" when they tried to change their passwords after the site was hacked due to a glitch in the old vBulletin software. This would have occurred around the end of February and does not apply after the site was converted to Xenforo. If you believe you were affected by this, please contact a staff member or use the Contact us link at the bottom of any forum page.

Huge salaries but no money for heat


eirepol

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 20, 2009
Messages
722
Website
www.sinnfein.org

bob3344

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 5, 2007
Messages
7,115
Ireland has the world's fourth highest pay rates for primary school teachers but some of these schools cannot afford basic items such as heating. One school has asked its pupils to wear coats to school as it cannot afford 300 quid to fix a boiler.

Is there anything that screams banana republic louder than that?

Cash-strapped school tells children to keep their coats on in class | BreakingNews.ie

OECD: Ireland
Good comment from Myers in the indo

And, as we've noted, the next Mellon bright idea is for jobless Irish teachers to be employed in Kenya: surely, one of the wittier outcomes of the Croke Park deal. We make teachers too expensive for Irish use, and then export our unemployment to Kenya. And if our teachers, why not our surplus civil servants, soldiers, police-officers? Rather like the days of the Empire, when surplus sons were packed off to run the Colonies.

ALL over Ireland we have schools with leaking roofs and stinking toilets. Yet instead of attending to these chronic local needs, thousands of Irish people have been building houses in South Africa. Next, no doubt, house-building in Kenya, which has been independent (39 years) for nearly as long as it was an official crown colony (42 years). However, the appetites of Irish piety are probably too restless to be confined to South Africa and Kenya, or even to neighbouring Uganda, where millions of Irish money have just vanished without trace.

No matter: we'll just borrow some more, at compound interest. Clearly, no African country is large enough to absorb all our charitable recklessness. We should simply annex the entire continent, from Cairo to the Cape, upon which stage we can then showcase our moral superiority to the world.
Kevin Myers: We're addicted to house building, but why indulge it in South Africa? - Kevin Myers, Columnists - Independent.ie
 

Disillusioned democrat

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 16, 2010
Messages
15,616
You couldn't ask for a better example of what's wrong with Ireland - the OP demonstrates where public money is going - not into the services but into the "servers" - oxymoronic as that may be.

The teachers get to moan and whine about this - on prime time RTE no less, but at the end of the day get to go home to a nice house in a nice car with full job security and very decent take home pay, while the families of the kids in the school are expected to fork out more for maintenance and heating.

This isn't a PS bashing thread, but hopefully it might get a few more people to realise that we need to get better at managing public expenditure across all fronts.
 

eirepol

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 20, 2009
Messages
722
Website
www.sinnfein.org
They're only kids. Let them freeze, get pissed on, whatever. Who gives a damn? So long as the teachers keep backing the I'm alright Jack brigade. I'm sick of it.
 

Aristodemus

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 8, 2009
Messages
3,741
Is the OP suggesting that the teachers pay to fix the boiler?
 

ballot stuffer

Well-known member
Joined
May 21, 2007
Messages
1,503
Ireland has the world's fourth highest pay rates for primary school teachers but some of these schools cannot afford basic items such as heating. One school has asked its pupils to wear coats to school as it cannot afford 300 quid to fix a boiler.
When it comes to that sort of choice it's clear miss-managament is the cause not shortage of funds.
 
D

Dylan2010

youve got to love socialised education mismatches consumer wants with its own goals. Maybe the dept want to reintroduce hedge schools by stealth or the Swedish concept of the forest school?
 

wombat

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 16, 2007
Messages
31,960
You couldn't ask for a better example of what's wrong with Ireland - the OP demonstrates where public money is going - not into the services but into the "servers" - oxymoronic as that may be..
Very well put.
 

sport02

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 25, 2010
Messages
19,656
Is the OP suggesting that the teachers pay to fix the boiler?
78% of the current education budget goes to service pay and pensions.
Only services can be cut under Croke Park.

That means the less than one quarter (22%)available to get the chop, keeps
getting squeezed.
 

eirepol

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 20, 2009
Messages
722
Website
www.sinnfein.org
We need to put services before salaries. Pay increases keep bringing in votes for the gombeen politicians but at a huge cost. We need politicians who can organize public services in a rational manner.
 

willow68

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 8, 2012
Messages
1,936
In my child's primary school (no heat there either, she's wearing two gansies plus a coat today - it's freezing down here..) it's the parent's fundraisers that pay for the so-called 'extras' - whiteboards, computers, gardening equipment were all paid for by us parents out of our after-tax income. So effectively we're doubly taxed, thanks very much. This is getting ever more difficult, and I'm glad she'll be out of there soon..
 
B

Boggle

Huge salaries? My oh is teaching over 6 years and only clears 500 a week.
Thats not that great a salary by any measure given her experience.

However, schools are desperately underfunded. Of that there is no question.
 

Disillusioned democrat

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 16, 2010
Messages
15,616
78% of the current education budget goes to service pay and pensions.
Only services can be cut under Croke Park.

That means the less than one quarter (22%)available to get the chop, keeps
getting squeezed.
If only there was a way to change that...oh well....
 

ShoutingIsLeadership

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 17, 2011
Messages
50,459
You couldn't ask for a better example of what's wrong with Ireland - the OP demonstrates where public money is going - not into the services but into the "servers" - oxymoronic as that may be.

The teachers get to moan and whine about this - on prime time RTE no less, but at the end of the day get to go home to a nice house in a nice car with full job security and very decent take home pay, while the families of the kids in the school are expected to fork out more for maintenance and heating.

This isn't a PS bashing thread, but hopefully it might get a few more people to realise that we need to get better at managing public expenditure across all fronts.
So teachers are to drag their own kids into poverty before they are entitled to comment on conditions? Would you ever give up that rubbish!
 

Neutron

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 6, 2012
Messages
3,980
Isnt there legal issues here?

I know the unions have rules that state teachers must ensure the class room must be above 17c or something like that.

We also have the office law where a constant minimum temp must be maintained. I would consider a school classroom to fall into the same catergory because children spend most of their time sitting down.

Apart from anything else why arent the unions doing their job and ensuring teachers follow union rules in relation to classroom temps.

Imagine if schools across Ireland started sending kids home because they couldnt afford to heat them. THe government would be shown up for what they are.
 

Disillusioned democrat

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 16, 2010
Messages
15,616
So teachers are to drag their own kids into poverty before they are entitled to comment on conditions? Would you ever give up that rubbish!
Eh - no, what are you talking about?

Schools are there to provide education, not to keep teachers employed - that's all I'm saying.
 

Neutron

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 6, 2012
Messages
3,980
Huge salaries? My oh is teaching over 6 years and only clears 500 a week.
Thats not that great a salary by any measure given her experience.

However, schools are desperately underfunded. Of that there is no question.
I know of one teacher who recently retired and she was earning over 100k per year. 30 years in the job. Now she is on a nic big fat public service pension.
 

Manstein

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 19, 2011
Messages
1,060
Hardly , he is suggesting that in a bankrupt country on the edge of Europe they might be happy to settle for much less pay , even the EU norm , the cheek of him !
I have no problem as long as the banks agree to settle for a lot less of their loans repaid seeing as we are a bankrupt country on the edge of Europe.

Cut net pay by say 100 euro a week. Unless you also cut 100 a week of mortgage/loan repayments that is 100 a week NOT being spent in the economy which will lead to further drop in demand which will mean more job losses which will mean less taxation and INCREASED social welfare. If pay is cut it is imperative that mortgages are cut as well.
 

Disillusioned democrat

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 16, 2010
Messages
15,616
This may open up the debate on fee paying vs non-fee paying schools a bit. It does demonstrate to an extent that all schools are likely to become fee paying to some degree or other. Where is that going to leave the ideologists who believe ALL education should be free - are they prepared to have their kids sit in freezing classrooms or will they pay for heating?

After that it's a slippery slope to full fee paying so there may be a softening in attitude towards fee paying parents (or a backlash claiming public schools cant afford heating because fee-paying schools are being subsidised too much).
 
Top