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human sewage as fertiliser for crops!


irish_goat

Member
Joined
Feb 26, 2008
Messages
38
I don't see the problem with it. It's deemed to be safe and is more cost effective so should keep prices lower. We've always used animal fertiliser so I don't see why we shouldn't use human.
 

DaveM

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 16, 2010
Messages
16,033
We already do. It's common practice in Ireland.
 

tonys

Active member
Joined
Oct 5, 2005
Messages
195
toxic avenger said:
How can estate agents fertilise crops exactly?
They don’t do it exactly, they do it in a random scuttery kind of way.
 

DaveM

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 16, 2010
Messages
16,033
toxic avenger said:
How can estate agents fertilise crops exactly?
I speak with the experience of years working in the poo industry... a recession proof business!
 
Joined
May 28, 2008
Messages
33
well maybe we should stop.....

Burning eyes, burning lungs, skin rashes and other symptoms of illness have been
found in a study of residents living near land fertilized with Class B biosolids, a byproduct
of the human waste treatment process.
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2002/07/020730075144.htm

Many cases of staphyloccoccal infections have been blamed on field-spread
sewage sludge exposure. The bacteria usually is found on skin but can enter
the body in wounds or orally, including strains that are resistant to
antibiotics. Some cases have been fatal, but none has been directly linked
to sludge. Sludge opponents note that the disease is found in raw sewage
coming into treatment plants. But supporters say it has never been found in
treated sludge.

There have been a few high-profile cases in recent years that sludge
opponents cite as ample evidence sludge is unsafe. In Augusta, Ga., a
farmer was awarded $550,000 by a jury this year after hundreds of his cows
died. The farmer blamed contaminated sewage sludge spread on his field,
apparently because of high levels of the metal molybdenum.

In 1994, 11-year-old Tony Behun of Osceolla Mills, Pa., rode a motorbike
through a field where sludge had been recently spread. He developed a fever
and lesions on his arm, fell into a coma, and died within a week.

Public health officials say there is no verifiable link between the sludge
and Behun's or anyone else's death. But sludge opponents disagree, and they
have formed a loose-knit but global network aimed at ending the application
of sludge used as fertilizer. Much of their information is exchanged over
the Internet, compiling local anecdotes now shared far away.

One of those opponents is microbiologist David Lewis, a former EPA
scientist who has blasted the agency for inadequate regulation. Lewis says
Behun's and possibly other people's sickness and death are tied to exposure
to sludge.

"The science is so bad, it clearly puts public health and safety at risk,"
he told the Washington Post. Lewis, an award-winning EPA scientist, was
fired from the agency this year, he says, because of his criticism of EPA
sludge policy.

Others say the EPA is acting in concert with the sludge industry because
land application is the least-expensive disposal. The EPA even coined the
term "biosolids" to help overcome the negative images that the word
"sludge" raises. The name shouldn't disguise what's inside, said Inese
Holte, who led an effort to ban sludge from being sprayed on Lakewood
Township forests in the 1990s.

http://www.organicconsumers.org/foodsafety/sludge101403.cfm
 

mairteenpak

Active member
Joined
Apr 21, 2008
Messages
196
Sewage contains all kinds of rubbish dumped into the sewers by industry including heavy metals.

The best way to use the energy bound up in it is to take off the bio gas and incinerate the dried sludge cake and bury the ash.
 

katy brock

Active member
Joined
Jun 20, 2008
Messages
206
mairteenpak said:
Sewage contains all kinds of rubbish dumped into the sewers by industry including heavy metals.
Yes, and what about all the detergents and medical waste that ends up in the sewers.
 

mairteenpak

Active member
Joined
Apr 21, 2008
Messages
196
We don't need the land we use to grow our food soiled with heavy metals such as lead etc
 

Oppenheimer

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 3, 2008
Messages
1,461
politicsisrotten said:
well maybe we should stop.....

Burning eyes, burning lungs, skin rashes and other symptoms of illness have been
found in a study of residents living near land fertilized with Class B biosolids, a byproduct
of the human waste treatment process.
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2002/07/020730075144.htm

Many cases of staphyloccoccal infections have been blamed on field-spread
sewage sludge exposure. The bacteria usually is found on skin but can enter
the body in wounds or orally, including strains that are resistant to
antibiotics. Some cases have been fatal, but none has been directly linked
to sludge. Sludge opponents note that the disease is found in raw sewage
coming into treatment plants. But supporters say it has never been found in
treated sludge.

There have been a few high-profile cases in recent years that sludge
opponents cite as ample evidence sludge is unsafe. In Augusta, Ga., a
farmer was awarded $550,000 by a jury this year after hundreds of his cows
died. The farmer blamed contaminated sewage sludge spread on his field,
apparently because of high levels of the metal molybdenum.

In 1994, 11-year-old Tony Behun of Osceolla Mills, Pa., rode a motorbike
through a field where sludge had been recently spread. He developed a fever
and lesions on his arm, fell into a coma, and died within a week.

Public health officials say there is no verifiable link between the sludge
and Behun's or anyone else's death. But sludge opponents disagree, and they
have formed a loose-knit but global network aimed at ending the application
of sludge used as fertilizer. Much of their information is exchanged over
the Internet, compiling local anecdotes now shared far away.

One of those opponents is microbiologist David Lewis, a former EPA
scientist who has blasted the agency for inadequate regulation. Lewis says
Behun's and possibly other people's sickness and death are tied to exposure
to sludge.

"The science is so bad, it clearly puts public health and safety at risk,"
he told the Washington Post. Lewis, an award-winning EPA scientist, was
fired from the agency this year, he says, because of his criticism of EPA
sludge policy.

Others say the EPA is acting in concert with the sludge industry because
land application is the least-expensive disposal. The EPA even coined the
term "biosolids" to help overcome the negative images that the word
"sludge" raises. The name shouldn't disguise what's inside, said Inese
Holte, who led an effort to ban sludge from being sprayed on Lakewood
Township forests in the 1990s.

http://www.organicconsumers.org/foodsafety/sludge101403.cfm
Interesting angle - I guess the idea of it potentially being bad for human health versus using other animal's number twos is the fact that there is very little likelihood of the bugs in their poo causing illness in humans, unless the bug could become or is transpecific. In the Young Scientist's this year a group did a study and demonstrated chicken sh1t as the best. Perhaps we could therefore confine the stuff we use to the political class!
 

blinding

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 1, 2008
Messages
17,838
I hope in a few years time we dont have some expert or professor saying I told ye not to do it!
 

katy brock

Active member
Joined
Jun 20, 2008
Messages
206
Oppenheimer said:
politicsisrotten said:
well maybe we should stop.....

Burning eyes, burning lungs, skin rashes and other symptoms of illness have been
found in a study of residents living near land fertilized with Class B biosolids, a byproduct
of the human waste treatment process.
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2002/07/020730075144.htm

Many cases of staphyloccoccal infections have been blamed on field-spread
sewage sludge exposure. The bacteria usually is found on skin but can enter
the body in wounds or orally, including strains that are resistant to
antibiotics. Some cases have been fatal, but none has been directly linked
to sludge. Sludge opponents note that the disease is found in raw sewage
coming into treatment plants. But supporters say it has never been found in
treated sludge.

There have been a few high-profile cases in recent years that sludge
opponents cite as ample evidence sludge is unsafe. In Augusta, Ga., a
farmer was awarded $550,000 by a jury this year after hundreds of his cows
died. The farmer blamed contaminated sewage sludge spread on his field,
apparently because of high levels of the metal molybdenum.

In 1994, 11-year-old Tony Behun of Osceolla Mills, Pa., rode a motorbike
through a field where sludge had been recently spread. He developed a fever
and lesions on his arm, fell into a coma, and died within a week.

Public health officials say there is no verifiable link between the sludge
and Behun's or anyone else's death. But sludge opponents disagree, and they
have formed a loose-knit but global network aimed at ending the application
of sludge used as fertilizer. Much of their information is exchanged over
the Internet, compiling local anecdotes now shared far away.

One of those opponents is microbiologist David Lewis, a former EPA
scientist who has blasted the agency for inadequate regulation. Lewis says
Behun's and possibly other people's sickness and death are tied to exposure
to sludge.

"The science is so bad, it clearly puts public health and safety at risk,"
he told the Washington Post. Lewis, an award-winning EPA scientist, was
fired from the agency this year, he says, because of his criticism of EPA
sludge policy.

Others say the EPA is acting in concert with the sludge industry because
land application is the least-expensive disposal. The EPA even coined the
term "biosolids" to help overcome the negative images that the word
"sludge" raises. The name shouldn't disguise what's inside, said Inese
Holte, who led an effort to ban sludge from being sprayed on Lakewood
Township forests in the 1990s.

http://www.organicconsumers.org/foodsafety/sludge101403.cfm
Interesting angle - I guess the idea of it potentially being bad for human health versus using other animal's number twos is the fact that there is very little likelihood of the bugs in their poo causing illness in humans, unless the bug could become or is transpecific. In the Young Scientist's this year a group did a study and demonstrated chicken sh1t as the best. Perhaps we could therefore confine the stuff we use to the political class!

True true. Didn`t I read somewhere that human urine was used for soaking animal hides before it was tanned into leather? Back in the middle ages I mean. Probably still goes on in Morocco and places like that. Mind you, didn`t people used to die like flies!
 

Oppenheimer

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 3, 2008
Messages
1,461
katy brock said:
True true. Didn`t I read somewhere that human urine was used for soaking animal hides before it was tanned into leather? Back in the middle ages I mean. Probably still goes on in Morocco and places like that. Mind you, didn`t people used to die like flies!
Yep - smelly business. It was not only urine - any mildly acidic material, acetic acid (vinegar) could be used, but it was also used in combination with dung and some other nasty chemicals. At least with urine, there was some antiseptic nature to the mix - not for long though and if you did not die of the potential disease it threw up, the chemical vapours would get ye! :shock:
 

Stentor

Well-known member
Joined
May 14, 2012
Messages
2,173
Treated human sewage,

Delicious. Pass the breakfast cereal.

Seriously though, it's common all over the developing world. 'Treated' is the key word here.

Keep it up. We are stardust after all.

50th post. Yipee.
 
Last edited:

Mitsui2

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 13, 2009
Messages
33,382
I like TA's question on the first page, from the summer of 2008: "How can estate agents fertilise crops exactly?"

Just imagine, if you'd asked that question on these boards two years later, the kind of murderous suggestions it would have elicited! :)
 

pippakin

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 22, 2010
Messages
9,665
Hate the idea of it but hasn't it been used as manure for centuries? Now its probably so full of drugs its dangerous but its probably still common practice in some countries.
 

Nigel Scrabble

Active member
Joined
Jul 11, 2012
Messages
228
I like TA's question on the first page, from the summer of 2008: "How can estate agents fertilise crops exactly?"

Just imagine, if you'd asked that question on these boards two years later, the kind of murderous suggestions it would have elicited! :)
Aye. It made me think of the wood chipper scene in Fargo:)
 

TommyO'Brien

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 14, 2009
Messages
12,222
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