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Hungary


THR

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In my opinion that country in Central-Europe is something of a role-model for small countries. I really admire the Hungarians for their ability to have been able to keep their own language. They are at the crossroads of the Slavic and Germanic nations and have been pressurised by both for centuries but yet they have maintained their own culture and language.

I really feel a great deal of admiration for that country as it belongs to the same Fenno-Ugric branch of nations and languages as my own one does. However, Hungarian is a sub-branch of its own. Finns and Estonians can understand each other to some degree but no-one can understand Hungarian except themselves. Many Hungarians say that theirs is the most isolated country and culture in Europe, a claim which I find a bit exaggerated given the location of the country in the heart of Europe.

However, the Hungarian language is something completely unrelated to any other language.The closest surviving relatives of the language are some almost extinct languages on the Siberian steppes. Hungary is really a country, a nation and a language of its own.

Well done for them to have had their language survived at that part of the continent. If you compare to other small nations, The Finns and the Estonians have been able to preserve their languages because of their remote location, the Celtic nations have lost their languages.
 

kerrynorth

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Oct 5, 2005
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Economy is shite though!
 

Ard-Taoiseach

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Aug 11, 2007
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This country has been on my mind the past fortnight. Their economic situation is worrying.

Overall growth is forecast to be a tiny 2% for 2007, with a small increase to 3% this year.

Inflation ran at a very high 7.8% throughout 2007, an economy growing at 2% should have a lower figure.

Its' unemployment rate of 7.3% is among the highest of the newer EU member-states.

They need to get their economic act together.
 

Ard-Taoiseach

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kerrynorth said:
Economy is shite though!
And I, shock horror, agree with you economic-wise for once. Read above(this post!)
 

John Kalahan

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Jan 5, 2008
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they will keep the language for a while but eventually european culture will homogenise

wait till we have a european army, then must come more european patriotism

the computer has made english prevelent, the east is using it too, all will follow as the world gets smaller

they will have to look to boston to prosper and forget about sentementality
 

THR

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If you have ever heard the Finnish language spoken and if you have ever the Hungarian language spoken, as you understand neither of them you might be easily led to believe that they are the same language becease the rhythm of the speech and the intonation of the words is very very similar. You really don't speak English, German or Swedish with the same intonation as you speak Finnish and Hungarian. Many people have told me that at foreign airports they hear very familiar-sounding mumble being said and they think there are other Finns but when they get closer they realise they are Hungarians whose language has exactly the same intonation as Finnish but is otherwise completely incomprehensible.
 

John Kalahan

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sounds like a good reason to harmonise language

should we revert to the language spoken in ireland 1000 years ago?
 

Decko

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Jun 17, 2004
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yes hungarians are to be admired.. lake balaton is wel worth a trip .. as for budapest - ok .. but not any different really to any capital
 

Riadach

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John Kalahan said:
sounds like a good reason to harmonise language

should we revert to the language spoken in ireland 1000 years ago?
When exactly do you think the language changeover took place?
 

Fionn_McCool

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Aug 14, 2007
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THR said:
In my opinion that country in Central-Europe is something of a role-model for small countries. I really admire the Hungarians for their ability to have been able to keep their own language. They are at the crossroads of the Slavic and Germanic nations and have been pressurised by both for centuries but yet they have maintained their own culture and language.
Things are not quite as rosy as you suggest... First, it was not a "small country" until 1918 when the Treaty of Trianon punished them very severely for being on the wrong side in WW1.

Compared with the former Kingdom of Hungary, the population of post-Trianon Hungary was reduced from 20.8 million to 7 million and its land area decreased by 72%. They lost 61% of arable land, 88% of timber, 62% of railroads, 64% of hard surface roads, 83% of pig iron output, 55% of industrial plants and 67% of credit and banking institutions of the former Kingdom of Hungary.

As a result, one quarter of the world's ethnic Hungarians live outside the borders of Hungary today and this is not emotionally accepted by most Hungarians. This longing for a the past glory of a "Greater Hungary" has led them into several unfortunate alliances and is the root cause of most of their problems since 1918.

Their nearly impossible language was forced upon non-Hungarian nationalities living in the Kingdom of Hungary by ruthless policies of Magyarization during the 19th century.

In spite of all the above, it is a wonderful country to visit and apart from a post imperial chip on the shoulder the people are fine and the wines are good.

.
 
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Pauli

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John Kalahan said:
they will keep the language for a while but eventually european culture will homogenise

wait till we have a european army, then must come more european patriotism

the computer has made english prevelent, the east is using it too, all will follow as the world gets smaller

they will have to look to boston to prosper and forget about sentementality
Is that the Boston we are closer to than Berlin??
 

THR

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Nov 15, 2006
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Those you tube-clips proved my point. There were those Hungarian songs. The intonation of the language, even when they are singing, is so similar to Finnish that when the songs started I first was listening "what are they singing" before I realised that it was in Hungarian.
 

soubresauts

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Jun 2, 2007
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One Irishman with an important Hungarian connection is Andy Irvine. He has been visiting Hungary and Eastern Europe since the mid-1960s, and spreading the musical influences he absorbed there.

Andy's latest album is with his "supergroup" Mozaik. It's called "Changing Trains" and it goes under the artist title "Andy Irvine & Dónal Lunny's MOZAIK".

The album was recorded in Budapest and has lots of Hungarian flavour. I wasn't surprised to find that it's wonderful, since Mozaik's first album "Live at the Powerhouse", recorded live in Brisbane a few years ago, is a masterpiece.

One of Andy's songs on the new album is all about Hungary; it's called "The Wind Blows over the Danube":

When I was young & in my prime, rambling it was on my mind
Dunáról fúj a szél
One fine day by the luck of the draw I found myself on the Danube shore
Dunáról fúj a szél...


The song mentions various towns: Szentendre, Pecs, Kaposvár

You'll want to go there!
 

THR

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However, that is news to me that the Hungarians and the Polish are such good friends and soul-brothers. Perhaps partly because Poland doesn't have ethnic Hungarians within its borders like Romania, Serbia, Slovakia and many other countries do.
 
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THR said:
However, that is news to me that the Hungarians and the Polish are such good friends and soul-brothers. Perhaps partly because Poland doesn't have ethnic Hungarians within its borders like Romania, Serbia, Slovakia and many other countries do.
There are many reasons for our friendship with Hungarians, I could
probably write a book if I wanted to mention all of them. If you
watched those three videos on YouTube and read the comments
you should understand some of the reasons.

I don't think there is anything comparable to Polish-Hungarian
relations in the world. Nowhere else in the world have two nations
of totally different languages and ethnic background have formed
such strong bonds of friendship and brothership.

Moreover, this friendship has a thousand years tradition and is
recognized by overwhelming majority of people of both countries,
regardless of their age or education.
 

kim chi

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Oct 29, 2007
Messages
45
Stevie Chalmers said:
I don't think there is anything comparable to Polish-Hungarian
relations in the world. Nowhere in the world have two nations
of totally different languages and ethnic background have formed
such strong bonds of friendship and brothership.
What, you mean the Irish are no longer the best pals of the Poles?
I'm so disappointed.
 
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kim chi said:
What, you mean the Irish are no longer the best pals of the Poles?
You are the last person in the world, with whom I'd like to have
a conversation about Irish-Polish relations, Paypal. :lol:

I'm so disappointed.
No, you're not dissapointed, Harvey.

Anyway, why do you keep changing your monikers on this forum ?
Don't you think it's kind of... I don't know... sad ?
 
G

Gadjodilo

Hungarian is fascinating. I learned a little bit of it a few years ago. The grammar is structured in such a way with suffixes and complex verb forms that sentences are only half the length of their English equivalent (or most other languages for that matter).

The following sentence means "I love you and you love me".
Látlak és látsz.

Also, because there are so many noun cases, the language has a rare fluidity to it.
 
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