Hurricane Harvey smashes into Texas

owedtojoy

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A Louisiana community face the fact that many may have to move in the face of coming floods, and that things may never be the same.

'It's Not Going To Be All Right'; - POLITICO Magazine

Louisiana’s Office of Community Development has launched a first-of-its-kind effort to help communities across the state prepare for the tumult to come.

Rising waters and escalating flood insurance rates will drive thousands of families farther inland, the state predicts, leaving behind homes they’ve known for generations and places that have fundamentally shaped their identities.

But those refugees aren’t the only ones who will experience change. Communities like Houma will experience their own jarring transition as they receive an influx of waterlogged neighbors.


What will happen when large cities like Tampa and Miami are the focus?
 


katsung47

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Trump doesn't believe climate change because he knows these disaster were men made.

Top Scientist Tells CBS: HAARP Responsible For Recent Hurricanes
September 9, 2017 Sean Adl-Tabatabai

World renowned physicist Dr. Michio Kaku made a shocking confession on live TV when he admitted that HAARP is responsible for the recent spate of hurricanes.

In an interview aired by CBS, Dr. Kaku admitted that recent ‘man-made’ hurricanes have been the result of a government weather modification program in which the skies were sprayed with nano particles and storms then “activated” through the use of “lasers”.

In the interview (below), Michio Kaku discusses the history of weather modification, before the CBS crew stop him in his tracks.

The High-Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) was created in the early 1990’s as part of an ionospheric research program jointly funded by the U.S. Air Force, the U.S. Navy, the University of Alaska Fairbanks, and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA).

https://youtu.be/DIXQXb5iAg4

Top Scientist Tells CBS: HAARP Responsible For Recent Hurricanes
 
D

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A Louisiana community face the fact that many may have to move in the face of coming floods, and that things may never be the same.

'It's Not Going To Be All Right'; - POLITICO Magazine

Louisiana’s Office of Community Development has launched a first-of-its-kind effort to help communities across the state prepare for the tumult to come.

Rising waters and escalating flood insurance rates will drive thousands of families farther inland, the state predicts, leaving behind homes they’ve known for generations and places that have fundamentally shaped their identities.

But those refugees aren’t the only ones who will experience change. Communities like Houma will experience their own jarring transition as they receive an influx of waterlogged neighbors.


What will happen when large cities like Tampa and Miami are the focus?
Great article. Know many of the places mentioned very well.

I wish the author would've gone a little further and investigated what the rates from the NFIP are for those who choose to stay in the bayous and swamps. From personal experience, I would guess that they're prohibitively high... thus discouraging new homeowners from moving in. Same probably goes for fire/liability/theft, and even auto policies from conventional underwriters.


New Orleans is a large city. So is Houston. And Jacksonville. And Guangzhou. And Calcutta. And Cork. And New York. Living at, or below high tide is a bad idea unless you're a crab or a seagull. Trouble is, historically, that's where food was and trade happened. It's why 80% of us live in proximity to the coast. It's an evolutionary thing. Reversing that trend might be problematic...I mean, imagine a Corkwegian leaving his cave by "de banks" and having to go to a shack in the Reeks?
 

SideysGhost

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New Orleans is a large city. So is Houston. And Jacksonville. And Guangzhou. And Calcutta. And Cork. And New York. Living at, or below high tide is a bad idea unless you're a crab or a seagull. Trouble is, historically, that's where food was and trade happened. It's why 80% of us live in proximity to the coast. It's an evolutionary thing. Reversing that trend might be problematic...I mean, imagine a Corkwegian leaving his cave by "de banks" and having to go to a shack in the Reeks?
Ach well in the long run 80% of us will still live by the coast. It's just that the coast then will be a few miles inland from where it is now and a lot of current cities will be half-drowned abandoned ruins.

This has all happened before after all, there's loads of drowned cities around the world from the last big rise in sea levels at the end of the Ice Age.

The problem will be managing the migration I suppose, it's not like the seas will suddenly jump 20 feet, instead it'll be gradual over decades so low-lying cities will just get more and worse flooding events until some suburbs (or downtown areas) become uninhabitable swamps. If we plan for it it shouldn't be beyond us as a species. It's probably beyond our current broken political and economic systems though.
 


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