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I remain an unrepentant euro fanatic.


He3

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Oct 1, 2008
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17,094
So says Financial Times Associate Editor Wolfgang Münchau today.

It doesn't make much sense but I'm a eurofanatic - FT.com

He explains that his fanaticism is grounded in his geopolitical views rather than in economics. He believes the EU deserves and ought to be what he calls a superpower. He doesn't describe what that would look like or how it would operate. But then he is disarmingly candid about his formative process where euro fanaticism is concerned:

"I simply do not need any economic reason to arrive at this position, or any rational reason at all for that matter. I am like a six year old in this respect. I want the EU because I want it."

The FT is behind a paywall, but I think they allow access to a few articles monthly for nothing. For a free insight into fanaticism it is worth that much.

The article is titled 'It doesn’t make much sense but I’m a eurofanatic.' Google is your friend.

Luckily Ireland's currency policy rests on steadier ground.
 

R3volution_R3ady

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 17, 2012
Messages
2,370
So says Financial Times Associate Editor Wolfgang Münchau today.

It doesn't make much sense but I'm a eurofanatic - FT.com

He explains that his fanaticism is grounded in his geopolitical views rather than in economics. He believes the EU deserves and ought to be what he calls a superpower. He doesn't describe what that would look like or how it would operate. But then he is disarmingly candid about his formative process where euro fanaticism is concerned:

"I simply do not need any economic reason to arrive at this position, or any rational reason at all for that matter. I am like a six year old in this respect. I want the EU because I want it."

The FT is behind a paywall, but I think they allow access to a few articles monthly for nothing. For a free insight into fanaticism it is worth that much.

The article is titled 'It doesn’t make much sense but I’m a eurofanatic.' Google is your friend.

Luckily Ireland's currency policy rests on steadier ground.
A rantings of a raving lunatic.
 

ruserious

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Jan 3, 2011
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29,597
To beat the FT firewall, simply google search the title and click the link on google news. Works every time.
 

Ribeye

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Sync

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That's a very very weird article. I guess I kind of understand what he's saying, that Europe is simply ingrained in his cultural outlook at this point, but it's just odd all the way through.
 

Pinster

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Nov 2, 2012
Messages
242
The problem was never the single currency, as a matter of fact the Euro is the only thing holding Europe together at the moment,

I blame incompetent governments and a criminal banking system across Europe for overborrowing and overspending on the back of a stable currency.
 

Ribeye

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The problem was never the single currency, as a matter of fact the Euro is the only thing holding Europe together at the moment,

I blame incompetent governments and a criminal banking system across Europe for overborrowing and overspending on the back of a stable currency.
yes. if only we had honest competent people in charge, im sure that this collectivism thing would work great,

Give me strength,
 

kvran

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May 6, 2010
Messages
1,151
I clicked the thread thinking a p.ie poster was admitting to being a Euro fanatic but instead I see a nice straw man set up and a new word for the hard eurosceptics lexicon "eurofanatic".

Let the hyperbole, assertions and assumption commence. I see someone already got a 1984 reference in.
 

DuineEile

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Messages
14,939
I was of similar mind to this chap. I was fervently in favour of the euro for example. I once told Alan Dukes in a radio call in that I was genetically disposed towards the EU, and that was why I couldn't understand why we had not entered into discussion to join the Schengen area.

I think it was the realisation of the damage that the euro has caused to us, particularly the fact that it allowed the dumping of cheap money into our economy, and inflated our property bubble, that caused me to turn away from an emotional political attachment to the EU.

And before anyone says it, I am a Shinner. I have been a Shinner for a very long time. But I was always in favour of the european project in general, if not always in favour of all parts of it. I was in favour of the euro. I was in favour of Schengen. I can't say that I have any emotional attachment left.


D
 

viper999

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Dec 9, 2011
Messages
2,093
ya screw economics with massive unenployment
and social misery for millions of europeans, this
f.ucking one size fits all currency has been a disaster with no end in sight for any of the piigs
federalists remind me of those behind the ussr
and hopefully it will fall in time,
 

kvran

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Joined
May 6, 2010
Messages
1,151
The problem was never the single currency, as a matter of fact the Euro is the only thing holding Europe together at the moment,
Yes because the single market, free travel and co-operation across areas such as policing have been thoroughly discredited?

You realise that many people even the AfD have been saying that pretty much everything about the EU is great except the €
 

bluefirelog

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Joined
Jun 28, 2011
Messages
2,772
When I saw the thread title and that it was started by He3, I thought for a minute he might have had some sort of Pauline conversion to the EU...:lol:
 

kvran

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Joined
May 6, 2010
Messages
1,151
I was of similar mind to this chap. I was fervently in favour of the euro for example. I once told Alan Dukes in a radio call in that I was genetically disposed towards the EU, and that was why I couldn't understand why we had not entered into discussion to join the Schengen area.

I think it was the realisation of the damage that the euro has caused to us, particularly the fact that it allowed the dumping of cheap money into our economy, and inflated our property bubble, that caused me to turn away from an emotional political attachment to the EU.

And before anyone says it, I am a Shinner. I have been a Shinner for a very long time. But I was always in favour of the european project in general, if not always in favour of all parts of it. I was in favour of the euro. I was in favour of Schengen. I can't say that I have any emotional attachment left.


D
Why would the issues with the € make your turn away from the EU? I disagree with a lot of Irish Government policy but it doesn't make me anti the state.
 

tipp revolution

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Feb 16, 2011
Messages
2,603
You better learn what auf weidersehn means cos you'll be hearing it sooner or later..
 
Last edited:

lying eyes

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Joined
Apr 27, 2009
Messages
4,417
So says Financial Times Associate Editor Wolfgang Münchau today.

It doesn't make much sense but I'm a eurofanatic - FT.com

He explains that his fanaticism is grounded in his geopolitical views rather than in economics. He believes the EU deserves and ought to be what he calls a superpower. He doesn't describe what that would look like or how it would operate. But then he is disarmingly candid about his formative process where euro fanaticism is concerned:

"I simply do not need any economic reason to arrive at this position, or any rational reason at all for that matter. I am like a six year old in this respect. I want the EU because I want it."

The FT is behind a paywall, but I think they allow access to a few articles monthly for nothing. For a free insight into fanaticism it is worth that much.

The article is titled 'It doesn’t make much sense but I’m a eurofanatic.' Google is your friend.

Luckily Ireland's currency policy rests on steadier ground.
This guy reminds me of FF supporters>>>>>>>>>>>>
 

Sync

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 27, 2009
Messages
28,845
ya screw economics with massive unenployment
and social misery for millions of europeans, this
f.ucking one size fits all currency has been a disaster with no end in sight for any of the piigs
federalists remind me of those behind the ussr
and hopefully it will fall in time,
What do you think our unemployment rates were like prior to the 1992 agreement to go into the euro? There's a reasonable argument to be made that our natural unemployment rate was suppressed by exuberance over the Euro and the eurozone investment that flowed into the country because of it.

If we're going to get on at this guy for ignoring facts and just cheering on the EU regardless, then it's only fair to get on at the people ignoring facts and blaming the EU for everything.
 

moralhazard77

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 3, 2011
Messages
2,344
So says Financial Times Associate Editor Wolfgang Münchau today.

It doesn't make much sense but I'm a eurofanatic - FT.com

He explains that his fanaticism is grounded in his geopolitical views rather than in economics. He believes the EU deserves and ought to be what he calls a superpower. He doesn't describe what that would look like or how it would operate. But then he is disarmingly candid about his formative process where euro fanaticism is concerned:

"I simply do not need any economic reason to arrive at this position, or any rational reason at all for that matter. I am like a six year old in this respect. I want the EU because I want it."

The FT is behind a paywall, but I think they allow access to a few articles monthly for nothing. For a free insight into fanaticism it is worth that much.

The article is titled 'It doesn’t make much sense but I’m a eurofanatic.' Google is your friend.

Luckily Ireland's currency policy rests on steadier ground.

Fanatics are scary. I don't get it.
God help us all.
 
Last edited:

Ireniall

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Oct 7, 2011
Messages
8,160
No as Gay Mitchel pointed out -soon us Europeans are going to make up less than 6% of the worlds population and the others are organised into enormous blocs with the concomitant levels of influence and power-which has certain implications for us all.

I'm not at all convinced that what the Chinese want is going to be good for us or good for the world in general-like the best of luck to them and they deserve a break but the kind of cynical and opaque manipulations which are no doubt normal currency in the corridors of power there have nothing to offer the world in general.

Here in Europe we have learned the hard way that a balance of sorts is necessary so that something near optimum conditions exist for the advancement of the human race in happy and stable circumstances. A balance between left and right, between church and state, between collective interest and the rights of the individual. Only on a relatively small part of the earths surface is this the case and yet it's as if we have no idea what it is we have to offer.

Because to me what these other,ultimately more powerful continents, need to take from us as a matter of urgency is some sort of a shortcut to where we are in this regard. They are humans like us so they are going to need something like the same solutions that we have and if we fail to push our case it is to humanity in general that we are doing a disservice not just ourselves.

That is why I'm in favour of a united Europe, a united British Isles and a United Ireland. But does this mean I'm in favour of Ireland being screwed to the wall by our more powerful partners because we were stupid enough to put ourselves on the hook for the banks? -fukk no. Europe has a massive test in front of it in the coming decades-nothing less than an alliance of brotherly nation states or an ugly coalition of greed and convenience. The jury is still out but the early indications are slightly negative-I guess the aftermath of the up coming German elections will be telling. Even if the European project remains broadly intact I'm not necessarily convinced any longer that we should be a part of it-it might be more in our interests to be semi-detached.
 

sauntersplash

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Joined
Feb 3, 2009
Messages
3,466
No as Gay Mitchel pointed out -soon us Europeans are going to make up less than 6% of the worlds population and the others are organised into enormous blocs with the concomitant levels of influence and power-which has certain implications for us all.

I'm not at all convinced that what the Chinese want is going to be good for us or good for the world in general-like the best of luck to them and they deserve a break but the kind of cynical and opaque manipulations which are no doubt normal currency in the corridors of power there have nothing to offer the world in general.

Here in Europe we have learned the hard way that a balance of sorts is necessary so that something near optimum conditions exist for the advancement of the human race in happy and stable circumstances. A balance between left and right, between church and state, between collective interest and the rights of the individual. Only on a relatively small part of the earths surface is this the case and yet it's as if we have no idea what it is we have to offer.

Because to me what these other,ultimately more powerful continents, need to take from us as a matter of urgency is some sort of a shortcut to where we are in this regard. They are humans like us so they are going to need something like the same solutions that we have and if we fail to push our case it is to humanity in general that we are doing a disservice not just ourselves.

That is why I'm in favour of a united Europe, a united British Isles and a United Ireland. But does this mean I'm in favour of Ireland being screwed to the wall by our more powerful partners because we were stupid enough to put ourselves on the hook for the banks? -fukk no. Europe has a massive test in front of it in the coming decades-nothing less than an alliance of brotherly nation states or an ugly coalition of greed and convenience. The jury is still out but the early indications are slightly negative-I guess the aftermath of the up coming German elections will be telling. Even if the European project remains broadly intact I'm not necessarily convinced any longer that we should be a part of it-it might be more in our interests to be semi-detached.
I find your air of superiority somewhat ironic.

"Here in Europe we have learned the hard way"? I wonder could you elaborate on this please? Nothing has been "learned" in other cultures, civilisations, political doctrines presumably?
 
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