I wish to do my business/personal dealings in Irish/Gaeilge.

Hans Von Horn

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Peig was right. An appalling curriculum killed the language for many. And mandating Peig to about 3 generations of school kids was the nadir of that death.

And there is more than a whiff of cultural piety /purity about how us non native speakers encounter Garlgori .

Many of us have been put off by all of this.

The relatively wide proliferation of Gaelscoilenna will help in time, but there needs to be greater promotion of free language lessons in the evenings. I am rapidly hitting the point where my elder boy's vocabulary outstripped my ability to help him with homework.

This means that either I have to find time to learn it or he'll be at a disadvantage in school. He's not in a GS.
Kids who knew from an early age they were destined for the emigrant boat saw very little use in the Irish Language.
 


Gin Soaked

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He's talking about the lack of provision for Irish speakers in businesses.
So is there going to be a tax break for paying more for native speakers in companies? There is already a skills shortage (of employable people, rather than the persistent unemployable)
 

Cellachán Chaisil

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So is there going to be a tax break for paying more for native speakers in companies? There is already a skills shortage (of employable people, rather than the persistent unemployable)
No.
 

blokesbloke

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Is maith liom an teanga Gaeilge. I like Irish. Yet I find there is no Irish used at the local Shops/Churches/Pubs. Cén fáth. Why? As an Irish language fan why is there such little support for the native tongue in "trendy modern independent Ireland". Irish politicians and people love to lecture the rest of Europe and the World about rights!
To be fair if you're talking about local shops, churches and pubs I'm not sure what you want politicians to do. They can't force someone to speak to you in Irish for the same very good reason they can't force them to speak to you in Swahili - most people cannot speak it.

All you can do is ask the person you're dealing with if they can speak Irish. If they can, you can then switch to Irish. If they can't, I'm not sure what you want politicans to do about it.

I remember suggesting that for businesses Irish speaking workers could wear some sort of pin or badge which would let you know they could speak it - in tourists towns in the UK they sometimes do this with other languages.

A shop could put up a sign saying "Irish spoken" if all their staff can speak it. If not, individual staff members could wear the badge/pin - if they wear a nametag or ID badge anyway, the symbol or words can be added to that.

Apparently something along these lines was done in the past - I think it's something which should be revived. It means you can tell at a glance who can speak to you in Irish so you can address them in Irish immediately without risk of embarrassment as you will know they'll understand you.

If a national symbol or form of words can be agreed then you could use it across the country - it could usefully extend to NI as well.

Ultimately there is clearly something very wrong which how Irish is taught in Irish schools. Whether you agree it should be a compulsory subject or not, the fact remains that it is.

Anyone who has gone through so many years of Irish learning at school should be able to speak Irish to at least a basic level, enough to hold a simple conversation as you might have in shop etc.

Clearly the teaching methods being used for Irish are ineffective.
 
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Cruimh

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So is there going to be a tax break for paying more for native speakers in companies? There is already a skills shortage (of employable people, rather than the persistent unemployable)
If there was a demand for it wouldn't market forces mean that businesses would be seeking a competitive edge by employing native speakers regardless of tax breaks?

Scratch the surface and you'll see that people like redneck want social engineering and a mechanism to induce or force the public to speak Irish.
 

Cruimh

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To be fair if you're talking about local shops, churches and pubs I'm not sure what you want politicians to do. They can't force someone to speak to you in Irish for the very good reason they can't force them to speak to you in Swahili - most people cannot speak it.

All you can do is ask the person you're dealing with if they can speak Irish. If they can, you can then switch to Irish. If they can't, I'm not sure what you want politicans to do about it.

I remember suggesting that for businesses Irish speaking workers could wear some sort of pin or badge which would let you know they could speak it - in tourists towns in the UK they sometimes do this with other languages.

A shop could put up a sign saying "Irish spoken" if all their staff can speak it. If not, individual staff members could wear the badge/pin - if they wear a nametag or ID badge anyway, the symbol or words can be added to that.

Apparently something along these lines was done in the past - I think it's something which should be revived. It means you can tell at a glance who can speak to you in Irish so you can address them in Irish immediately without risk of embarrassment as you will know they'll understand you.

If a national symbol or form of words can be agreed then you could use it across the country - it could usefully extend to NI as well.

Ultimately there is clearly something very wrong which how Irish is taught in Irish schools. Whether you agree it should be a compulsory subject or not, the fact remains that it is.

Anyone who has gone through so many years of Irish learning at school should be able to speak Irish to at least a basic level, enough to hold a simple conversation as you might have in shop etc.

Clearly the teaching methods being used for Irish are ineffective.
Welcome back sweetie! People have been asking after you!
 

Hans Von Horn

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If there was a demand for it wouldn't market forces mean that businesses would be seeking a competitive edge by employing native speakers regardless of tax breaks?

Scratch the surface and you'll see that people like redneck want social engineering and a mechanism to induce or force the public to speak Irish.
There is no market advantage in using Irish only a market disadvantage. Irish Hobbyists are always on the make for another soft Irish Subsidy.
 

Hunter-Gatherer

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An Ireland that looks out into the World has very little use for Irish. A DeValera Ireland of self sufficiency could not sustain the Irish Language.
De Valera wanted us speaking irish, living in caves, eating home farm produce and with buxom virgins tying their knees together with rosary beads. And if you didnt agree with him, he would shoot you.
 

Clanrickard

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De Valera wanted us speaking irish, living in caves, eating home farm produce and with buxom virgins tying their knees together with rosary beads. And if you didnt agree with him, he would shoot you.
You obviously can't/won't speak Irish. That's fine. Your decision but don't sneer at others who wish to do so.
 

Hunter-Gatherer

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Clearly the teaching methods being used for Irish are ineffective.
Rubbish. The lady at my school taught Irish and French. She got great results for the latter while the former language was torture.

its not the teaching methods that suck, its the arrogance and compulsion and utter redundancy of the language.
 

Hans Von Horn

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It was only the poor and the least educated that were selected to populate the Gaeltachtaí in Meath. They were all that was left that had Irish.
 

Hans Von Horn

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Were it not for the soft Irish Language jobs in teaching primary school would any Students learn Irish?
 

Hans Von Horn

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If SKY introduced an Irish Language pay per view channel would anyone pay for it?
 

Spanner Island

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What in God's name has Peig got to do with this conversation?

I don't mean to be rude, but if all you know about the situation the Irish language is in is Peig, perhaps you'd be wiser to bow out of this discussion.

I did say 'and an abysmal curriculum'... which it was back in the 1980s...

Tediously dull and boring and killed any enthusiasm I may have had for the language... and I certainly wasn't alone either...

Deny the reality of what happened and Irish is doomed for the future too...

I assume it's improved since but any potential interest I may have had in it is long gone.

I know more French than I do Irish despite having been subjected to Irish for 6 years longer than I was to French.
 
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ruman

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Your kids don't have to sit beside a foreigner or a Roma or a traveller.

That's why they are so popular.
Actually my son's best friends in his class have parents from Croatia, France , Poland and Spain. My own wife is South American.
Don't let reality obscure your self hatred though.
 

JimmyFoley

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[/QUOTE]Ultimately there is clearly something very wrong which how Irish is taught in Irish schools.[/QUOTE]

That old chestnut!

I learned Irish in much the same way I learned French. I just had no interest in the former.

In what way do people think Irish should be taught? Cheerleaders? "Give me a fada!" Trained dolphins? Video linkups with Premier League players?
 

Congalltee

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Rubbish. The lady at my school taught Irish and French. She got great results for the latter while the former language was torture.

its not the teaching methods that suck, its the arrogance ... of the language.
How can a language be arrogant?
 


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