Ian Paisley and his responsibility for the troubles

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I was just listening to RTE radio. The superlative journalist Ed Moloney was discussing the life of Ian Paisley.

Moloney offered a devastating assessment of Ian Paisley, saying that, without Paisley, Sir Terence O'Neill might have survived as leader of Northern Ireland and there would not have been any troubles or Provo campaign.


I suppose a good case can be made that Paisley is not the only one who bears responsibility for the troubles. Nonetheless, Moloney's assessment is savage and indicates his belief that Paisley bears great responsibility for causing the troubles in Northern Ireland.

I'll try to put up a podcast of Moloney's contribution on RTE Liveline later
 


Just Jack

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Without him the IRA would have remained a group of old-timers with antiquated weaponry.

This generation of unionists won't be able to judge his role objectively, that will have to come for later generations, who will see him, as the man who revitalized and ultimately unleashed the dormant IRA.
 

tiocfaidh

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John Cushnahan said it best:

Former Alliance Party leader John Cushnahan said that while he sympathised with the family, he was astonished at the "rewriting" of Ian Paisley's political contribution.

"While I welcome the fact that he ultimately embraced power sharing, it was too little too late and should not be used to excuse the pain and suffering that he inflicted on the people of Northern Ireland for the majority of his political life," he said.

Mr Cushnahan said that his life was "punctuated with nakedly sectarian acts and deeds".

BBC News - Ian Paisley: Politicians and religious leaders react to death
 
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Sync

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Without him the IRA would have remained a group of old-timers with antiquated weaponry.

This generation of unionists won't be able to judge his role objectively, that will have to come for later generations, who will see him, as the man who revitalized and ultimately unleashed the dormant IRA.
Yup. His fear and bigotry helped bring about what he sought to avoid.
 

Tommythesash

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I was just listening to RTE radio. The superlative journalist Ed Moloney was discussing the life of Ian Paisley.

Moloney offered a devastating assessment of Ian Paisley, saying that, without Paisley, Sir Terence O'Neill might have survived as leader of Northern Ireland and there would not have been any troubles or Provo campaign.
Bollix, Craig and Faulkner posed a greater threat to O'Neill than Paisley.


I suppose a good case can be made that Paisley is not the only one who bears responsibility for the troubles. Nonetheless, Moloney's assessment is savage and indicates his belief that Paisley bears great responsibility for causing the troubles in Northern Ireland.
There is no doubt that Paisley's contribution to sectarian violence in Ireland was huge. His bellicose rhetoric and hate filled speeches spurred nights of destruction and violence that often ended with the deaths of many Catholics and Protestants.

After being convicted of the sectarian murder of young Pater Ward one of the unionists who killed him said publicly that he wished he'd "never heard of that man, Paisley".
 
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TiredOfBeingTired

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John Cushnahan said it best:

Former Alliance Party leader John Cushnahan said that while he sympathised with the family, he was astonished at the "rewriting" of Ian Paisley's political contribution.

"While I welcome the fact that he ultimately embraced power sharing, it was too little too late and should not be used to excuse the pain and suffering that he inflicted on the people of Northern Ireland for the majority of his political life," he said.

Mr Cushnahan said that his life was "punctuated with nakedly sectarian acts and deeds".

BBC News - Ian Paisley: Politicians and religious leaders react to death
It is hard to achieve a balance immediately after death.
Similarly trying to rank Obama amongst all other American presidents is premature and a complete waste of time.

Below was written after the recent death of Albert Reynolds.
each time a former taoiseach dies, it becomes suddenly clear to us that we are the best governed country in the world. It turns out that each and every one of our leaders was a giant among men, a selfless visionary, a patriot to his fingertips. We realise that we have been extraordinarily lucky to share this little island and our own little lifetimes with men who, if they were kings, would have “the Great” appended to their names.
The death of a former taoiseach becomes an opportunity for instant revisionism
 

vivabrigada

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Republicans being Republicans. Don't tell me you expected any different?
Do you have a specfic example?
What version of Paisley did you admire most?
 


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