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'Iceland' boss on FSAI burger test results: “Well, that’s the Irish, isn’t it?”


darkknight

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Iceland boss apologises for comment about 'the Irish'

Mr Walker had been asked to explain why Iceland burgers passed British tests for equine DNA but failed the Irish tests.

He replied: “Well, that’s the Irish, isn’t it?”

The FSAI rejected Mr Walker's comments and warned that any attempt to cast doubt on the veracity and robustness of DNA testing carried on its behalf is disingenuous, dishonest and untruthful.

His grovelling apology is pathetic.

Here's one former Iceland customer who won't shop there again so long as Walker is CEO.
 

Analyzer

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I thought that horses were very popular in Iceland.

 

Analyzer

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Iceland sell their products for the lowest price of anybody going in UK and Ireland and nobody questions the ingredients.
 

SEAMAI

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I thought that horses were very popular in Iceland.

They've got a fifth gait which probably adds to the taste.

As far as Mr Walker is concerned, that's exactly what I'd expect, Well that's the British for you, inn'it?
 

Aindriu

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They are just miffed that it was us that first discovered it all. Their minister of agriculture admitted as much last week.
 
Joined
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They are just miffed that it was us that first discovered it all. Their minister of agriculture admitted as much last week.
Pretty much as they wanted to use it as an Irish problem and UK was ok, that one fell flat on its face very quickly.
 

eoghanacht

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Well I'm not offended, this man is clearly an ass. In his poor attempt to discredit us he's acknowledged that we have higher standards.
 

The Preacher

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I was on a weekend break to Rejkavic years ago and went horse riding out in the lava fields (Iceland is pretty much one big volcano - their water systems are heated that way !) The horse they gave me (I was part of a tour group) was a jittery little f*cker and on the way back to the stables, panicked and bolted off at an alarming speed. The Preacher was very lucky not to end up either dead or quadraplegic.
 

Roll_On

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Yes that's the Irish for you, how dare we highlight flaws in food production. If it wasn't for the efforts of the Irish FSA in days gone by, British diseases like BSE and foot 'n' mouth would've went global very quickly. He might want to have a look at what passes for safe food in the UK before accusing us of being picky.

It's to be expected though, he peddles Z grade processed meats for a living.
 

blokesbloke

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Iceland boss says schools are to blame for horsemeat scandal - Telegraph

If what is said in this article is true, this bloke is absolutely all over the place regarding this matter. He contradicts himself constantly and makes no rational sense at all.

First of all, he says Iceland had no horsemeat in any of its products, yet it and Tesco were the first two UK supermarkets to be named as selling horsemeat burgers under their own brand names and Iceland admitted to removing them from sale.

He also blames everyone but the supermarkets for the problem, and yet says he doesn't believe that any supermarket had anymore than microscopic amounts of horsemeat from cross-contamination.

He goes on to say he would never eat "value" range food, yet then says there is nothing wrong with it!

He seems very confused. I wouldn't dream of shopping at Iceland with him in charge.
 

Con Gallagher

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May 25, 2010
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Well what has been the reaction here,
- outrage or horse puns?
- prosecutions or departmental inquiries?
- a rush to the butchers or continued buying of multinationals' "convenience" food?
- resolution of perceived conflicts of interests between the line minister and the CEO of a company implicated?
- accountability or acquiescence?

Shure it'll be grand, horse.
 

Analyzer

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I guess we should have wondered how the problem of abandoned horses had suddenly disappeared from the headlines!

The Sad Plight of Ireland's Abandoned Horses

Thousands of horses and ponies abandoned in Irish countryside as financial crisis bites

According to the Panorama investigation, many of those horses ended up in burgers and other processed 'beef' dishes!
There is a lot of truth in this. At the height of the binge, a lot of people were buying horses for pretenscious reasons - especially people who had business interersts in construction, the professions, or retail. This resulted in a lot of land being purchased/rented for the upkeep of the said glory horses. Land was being changed from being used to produce beef to keep horses.

After the crash, the land became used to produce horsemeat, effectively speaking. And unlike beef, there was no regulation. But there was a shortage of beef. No doubt aided by developers buying outbidding beef producers for land, causing less resources to be allocated to beef production.

I heard a rumour in 2009 that there were 200 horses a week being killed in a location in the West of Ireland, for meat, but that it would not make it into the media for obvious reasons. Simply put, too many people would be ruined, if the news broke. There was too much money in it.

Anyway, once again there is a stink of binge era mania somewhere back along in this mess.

Every calamity these days seems to originate in the rampant stupidity of the Bertie Binge era in this country.
 
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Roll_On

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He also blames everyone but the supermarkets for the problem, and yet says he doesn't believe that any supermarket had anymore than microscopic amounts of horsemeat from cross-contamination.
some frozen beef products were 100% horsemeat.

He goes on to say he would never eat "value" range food, yet then says there is nothing wrong with it!
CEO of Iceland wont shop in Iceland. Iceland did close all of it's operations in Ireland a few years ago, they came back when the recession started though. Vultures.
 

Analyzer

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Feb 14, 2011
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Iceland boss says schools are to blame for horsemeat scandal - Telegraph

If what is said in this article is true, this bloke is absolutely all over the place regarding this matter. He contradicts himself constantly and makes no rational sense at all.

First of all, he says Iceland had no horsemeat in any of its products, yet it and Tesco were the first two UK supermarkets to be named as selling horsemeat burgers under their own brand names and Iceland admitted to removing them from sale.

He also blames everyone but the supermarkets for the problem, and yet says he doesn't believe that any supermarket had anymore than microscopic amounts of horsemeat from cross-contamination.

He goes on to say he would never eat "value" range food, yet then says there is nothing wrong with it!

He seems very confused. I wouldn't dream of shopping at Iceland with him in charge.
Has he got mad cow disease or something along those lines ?
 
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