identity : county v town

McSlaggart

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It has been stated that "unionists" do not identify with their county in the same way that Irish people do. This would mean that a unionist who came from South Derry would identify with ? Cookstown their main shopping town?

I would interested if unionists would clarify if this cultural difference is generally true?
 


Newrybhoy

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It has been stated that "unionists" do not identify with their county in the same way that Irish people do. This would mean that a unionist who came from South Derry would identify with ? Cookstown their main shopping town?

I would interested if unionists would clarify if this cultural difference is generally true?
Which county you are from has no relevance whatsoever. Counties do not compete in any sports that I'm aware of beyond GAA, which means nothing to unionists.

People would identify with rugby,football,golf or cricket clubs if they were interested.

Northern Ireland would be the primary source of identity.
 

McSlaggart

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Which county you are from has no relevance whatsoever. Counties do not compete in any sports that I'm aware of beyond GAA, which means nothing to unionists.

People would identify with rugby,football,golf or cricket clubs if they were interested.

Northern Ireland would be the primary source of identity.
Thanks for the feedback.
 

theloner

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What I wanna know is do people in the Short Strand support Antrim or Down? And do they go around admitting they are from Down?

I feel people from the Glens are more Antrim than people from Belfast. Actually, the more northern Antrim you are from, the more Antrim you are.

I don't know much about rural Doire, but enjoy the city. Can count the number of times I have been to Fermanagh agus Tyrone without taking me socks off and don't understand why they aren't one county.

Armagh basically means you are close to escaping the madhouse and Newry should be demolished to make way for a pond or waterfall.
 

death or glory

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It has been stated that "unionists" do not identify with their county in the same way that Irish people do. This would mean that a unionist who came from South Derry would identify with ? Cookstown their main shopping town?

I would interested if unionists would clarify if this cultural difference is generally true?
Tis true,

Remember you used to enjoy my claim that I was from Strabane, my nearest Big Town.

Even though i am from miles outside it.
 

theloner

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Cookstown - shudder even thinking about it. Remember stopping off in Broughshane for a couple of battered sausages circa 2004. It was another level of grim. The accents, looks and general vibe.
 

AhNowStop

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What did the Romans ever do for us :?

The “County” was a great idea .... Yep, we’ll be keeping them after the glorious reunification :lol:
 

hollandia

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Strange that nationalists have an affinity for a British construction.
In large part they broadly represent the Irish kingdoms that preceded them. For example Tyrone was Eoghan's land and Donegal consists of Inishowen and Tir Conaill - Eoghan's island and conall's land - Eoghan and Conall being sons of an O'Neill king. But sure the Brits invented them :roll:
 

CastleRay

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Counties are rather meaningless and largely outdated state admin constructs. Each county still has a Lord Lieutenant appointed by The Queen but apart from that there’s little relevance in 2018. Gaa games have county representative teams as does football for the Super Cup NI. The scouting movement, Orange Order and other voluntary groups organise themselves on county lines too. But is there a county identity in day to day life? Not for me. I live in County Down but my postal address is County Antrim and sometimes Belfast is even seen as a county / district in its own right. For others people have a county identity but I rarely hear of it for counties Londonderry and Down. People talk more of the city and “south Derry” for Londonderry and “north down” and “south down” in Down. Neither is really ever an identity but more a description of where they live.
 

tokkie

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Strange that nationalists have an affinity for a British construction.
Not at all. Plenty of Nationalists have affinity for a variety of British constructs and institutions.

You lads are so bigoted you can't understand that it's possible (and permissible) to enjoy different cultures.
 

Talk Back

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Which county you are from has no relevance whatsoever. Counties do not compete in any sports that I'm aware of beyond GAA, which means nothing to unionists.

People would identify with rugby,football,golf or cricket clubs if they were interested.

Northern Ireland would be the primary source of identity.
So Unionists/Loyalists identify as Irish then?

I thought Unionists/Loyalists were pretending to be British in Ireland - to feel like the real British in Britain?
 

CastleRay

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Not at all. Plenty of Nationalists have affinity for a variety of British constructs and institutions.

You lads are so bigoted you can't understand that it's possible (and permissible) to enjoy different cultures.
Why do you throw around the word bigot so easily in one direction on here. It seems you aren’t reading what’s being written.
 

CastleRay

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So Unionists/Loyalists identify as Irish then?

I thought Unionists/Loyalists were pretending to be British in Ireland - to feel like the real British in Britain?
I’m British, Northern Irish, Irish and from Belfast. Many others hold similar identities. The census showed Northern Irish as a significant identity for many people in its own right.
 

Talk Back

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I’m British, Northern Irish, Irish and from Belfast. Many others hold similar identities. The census showed Northern Irish as a significant identity for many people in its own right.
Irish people are not British - we don't pretend we live in other people's countries.

Anyone born in Ireland (Ireland actually meaning Ireland - not the just the 'Southern Ireland' State) is obviously Irish.
 

Talk Back

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I’m British, Northern Irish, Irish and from Belfast. Many others hold similar identities. The census showed Northern Irish as a significant identity for many people in its own right.
You are just one of the minority 46 percent of people in the occupied 6 counties who identify as British in the new BBC poll then :lol:

 

CastleRay

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Irish people are not British - we don't pretend we live in other people's countries.

Anyone born in Ireland (Ireland actually meaning Ireland - not the just the 'Southern Ireland' State) is obviously Irish.
It is not in your gift to instruct others what their identity is based on your own politically motivated opinions.
 

Talk Back

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It is not in your gift to instruct others what their identity is based on your own politically motivated opinions.
No - but reality does :lol:

If you want to be Irish - you must obey the will of the people of Ireland. It is called democracy.
 


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