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Impact of subsea Earthquake in Bay of Biscay and Tsunami


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Landslide causes tsunamis off the coast of Cornwall - Telegraph

Ireland has had a number of Tsunami's over the years but no surviving lasting records of damage.

A small Tsunami off Cornwall was recorded 2 years ago but damage was little and was caused by a land slip at sea.

Bearing in mind the population that live close to the coast of Ireland on low lying areas has a study been done of the potential damage that could be caused by an undersea slip or quake in Bay of Biscay or off Portugal.

As Irish Sea will effectively channel a Tsunami both speeding it up and raising its height then clearly East Coast would not get off lightly nor would the South Coast.

Has there been any academic studies on a potential impact zone or warning systems ?
 

Dame_Enda

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The Cliffs of Moher would be a formidable obstacle to a tsunami, but there was a very destructive one in the early 1700s that I think killed hundreds in West Munster.

In 1755 Lisbon was destroyed both by an earthquake and a tsunami. that happened at the same time. 40,000 died and 80% of the city was destroyed. I think (though I am unsure) that the Irish tsunami may have been linked.

The greatest danger in terms of a plausible cause of a future Atlantic tsunami is the island of La Palma and other volcanic islands. If it erupts part of the island could fall into the sea, triggering one.

Below is a map of historical Atlantic tsunamis and levels of destruction.

 
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The Cliffs of Moher would be a formidable obstacle to a tsunami, but there was a very destructive one in the early 1700s that I think killed hundreds in West Munster.

In 1755 Lisbon was destroyed both by an earthquake and a tsunami. that happened at the same time. 40,000 died and 80% of the city was destroyed. I think (though I am unsure) that the Irish tsunami may have been linked.
There have been a number but currently there is no study on potential impact as feeling could be very significant.
 
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Bumping this because as can be seen from the combination of weather and tidal surges the flood defences are not really up to much.

Clearly a subsea quake as envisaged in Bay of Biscay or along Portugeese coast would find both UK and Ireland coastal areas swamped very quickly with little or no protection in place.
 

cabledude

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Bumping this because as can be seen from the combination of weather and tidal surges the flood defences are not really up to much.

Clearly a subsea quake as envisaged in Bay of Biscay or along Portugeese coast would find both UK and Ireland coastal areas swamped very quickly with little or no protection in place.
As a resident of the east coast, this worries me greatly.



[video=youtube;Zb4T8a1K5tw]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zb4T8a1K5tw[/video]


[video=youtube;oMH5YyJu8GQ]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oMH5YyJu8GQ[/video]
 
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johnny365

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The theory that part of the la Palma island could fall into the sea at once causing a mega tsunami was argued against in a recent documentary, geologists and scientists done a study and said there was little evidence that this break would happen all at once and cause a mega tsunami.
 
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The theory that part of the la Palma island could fall into the sea at once causing a mega tsunami was argued against in a recent documentary, geologists and scientists done a study and said there was little evidence that this break would happen all at once and cause a mega tsunami.
1755 Lisbon Earthquake cause a Tsunami that impacted Ireland
 

johnny365

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1755 Lisbon Earthquake cause a Tsunami that impacted Ireland
Yes i know that they werent arguing that a tsunami wouldnt cause massive damage to Ireland the Uk and other parts of Europe. They were making the point that even if their was a massive earthquake that the island was unlikely to break off like is suggested and cause a mega tsunami. They suggested that it would gradually break into the sea. They all agreed that a major earthquake off Portugal could have dire consequences but they were exploring the specific la Palma theory.
 

factlizard

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If there was an event of say the Japanese or Indonesian earthquake in the Bay of Biscay we would almost certainly be destroyed, most of our industry doesn't operation far from the sea.

Take Cork, Waterford, Wexford harbours alone thousands of jobs would be eliminated in minutes, if it carried on to Dublin and Belfast there would be little left.

Mind you the Atlantic brim of Europe would also be destroyed.
 

factlizard

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"How far inland is usually safe?", he asked selflessly.
Hard to say we have lots of rivers and canals in this country.

Safe might be an understatement, no electricity, no gas, no anything, society would implode rapidly.
 

asset test

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Seems to me that No one can predict earthquakes and therefore cannot predict resulting tsunamis either.

Can anyone say who predicted a tsunami, or the preceding earthquake anywhere recently?

There are hundreds, if not thousands of scientists and the like, manning these predictor centres and I don't know why they are there at all!

But I will await correction about this, humbly of course.
 

ruserious

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If there was an event of say the Japanese or Indonesian earthquake in the Bay of Biscay we would almost certainly be destroyed, most of our industry doesn't operation far from the sea.

Take Cork, Waterford, Wexford harbours alone thousands of jobs would be eliminated in minutes, if it carried on to Dublin and Belfast there would be little left.

Mind you the Atlantic brim of Europe would also be destroyed.
In 1976, the Bay of Biscay had a 4.8 earthquake which is the largest on recorded history for that region. It wasn't an outlier either.

I think we can be pretty safe in the knowledge that a mega quake is unlikely.
 

factlizard

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Seems to me that No one can predict earthquakes and therefore cannot predict resulting tsunamis either.

Can anyone say who predicted a tsunami, or the preceding earthquake anywhere recently?

There are hundreds, if not thousands of scientists and the like, manning these predictor centres and I don't know why they are there at all!

But I will await correction about this, humbly of course.
Japan and Indonesia?

500,000 dead is conservative imho.
 

Truth.ie

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Landslide causes tsunamis off the coast of Cornwall - Telegraph

Ireland has had a number of Tsunami's over the years but no surviving lasting records of damage.

A small Tsunami off Cornwall was recorded 2 years ago but damage was little and was caused by a land slip at sea.

Bearing in mind the population that live close to the coast of Ireland on low lying areas has a study been done of the potential damage that could be caused by an undersea slip or quake in Bay of Biscay or off Portugal.

As Irish Sea will effectively channel a Tsunami both speeding it up and raising its height then clearly East Coast would not get off lightly nor would the South Coast.

Has there been any academic studies on a potential impact zone or warning systems ?
How the Indo will report it.

"Mega-tsunami leads to nominal fall in asking prices in South County Dublin." Page 1, 3, 5-7
"Thousands feared dead in Dundalk", Page 22. Lifestyle supplement.
 

niall78

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Sep 10, 2010
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Seems to me that No one can predict earthquakes and therefore cannot predict resulting tsunamis either.

Can anyone say who predicted a tsunami, or the preceding earthquake anywhere recently?

There are hundreds, if not thousands of scientists and the like, manning these predictor centres and I don't know why they are there at all!

But I will await correction about this, humbly of course.
Potential tsunami can be predicted as the earthquake or landslide causing them will be monitored as it happens. This makes tsunami warnings a very important life saving tool. They give populations in low lying areas at least some warning.

Preceding earthquakes is a different matter. But with people working in that area hopefully one day it will be possible.
 
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"How far inland is usually safe?", he asked selflessly.
Its not how far inland but how high you are up...........water will go via route of least resistance hence if you looked at North Dublin then Howth and up Howth Head would be safe but everywhere from Sutton to Balbriggan would be in danger plus Dublin city centre and for miles back up the Liffey.

Would suggest everywhere East of Railway line unless high and then West of Railway anywhere there is a river valley.............water would go over the viaducts and keep going.................like Broadmeadow, Rogerstown, etc etc

In Japan a lake high up was inundated and full of seawater as water kept coming for many many miles.
 

factlizard

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In 1976, the Bay of Biscay had a 4.8 earthquake which is the largest on recorded history for that region. It wasn't an outlier either.

I think we can be pretty safe in the knowledge that a mega quake is unlikely.
After the Indonesian earthquake the earths axis move by a % of a degree, ie the tilt is different, geologists have yet to understand what effect this has on existing known fault lines or otherwise unknown fault lines.

An earthquake in the Irish Sea was a very rare event we've had 3 in the last few year's.

Never say Never.
 
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