Improved governance would allow room for tax cuts

Patslatt1

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This week a left wing politician argued on Newstalk that tax cuts should not be considered given pressing social needs that call for more government spending. The public have for too long been deceived by such arguments. Why don't the big government spenders honestly admit an awful lot of spending goes to waste? Recently,a former head of the HSE said that throwing more billions at it wouldn't improve the hospital services.
Ireland's extreme proportional representation voting system and resulting weak coalition governments are to blame, incentivising politicians to prioritise short termism, village pump politics and caving in to extravagant public sector pay deals. Long term planning essential for delivery of an efficient social welfare state is conducted on the hoof. For instance, budgets for housing disappear in economic recessions instead of being used as an efficient contracyclical economic stimulus. Spending per capita for university students has fallen about 40% in the past decade, so it's shouldn't be surprising that Cork University's international ranking has collapsed. Spending on basic infrastructure is among the lowest internationally as a percent of the economy,a few years ago as low as impoverished African countries.
In the 1950s, Taoiseach Eamon DeValera described coalition government resulting from proportional representation voting as similar to spancelled goats who stumbled along, their legs tied to prevent them from straying as they grazed on grass by the roadsides in rural Ireland. His solution,Fianna Fail's 1950s proposal for first past the post voting,was rejected in a referedum because people felt it would give FF too many government majorities and voters seemed to like the broad choices of PR. But DeValera's colourful criticism is still valid.
Disillusionment with establishment political parties gathered strength in the recent general election as voters lost faith in their capacity to govern altruistically in the national interest instead of grubbing for votes. The swing to Sinn Fein seems to be a protest vote but in the next election voters may foolishly come to believe SF is capable of altruism and will set aside its obsession with nationalism.
The only hope for long term political stability is a constitutional change to promote long term government planning. My simple suggestion is to limit the choice of votes on ballot papers to two of the available choices.That would allow more room for minority parties than the UK's FPTP system but would stop the descent to a parliament of ever more numerous squabbling parties.
 
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Patslatt1

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This week a left wing politician argued on Newstalk that tax cuts should not be considered given pressing social needs that call for more government spending. The public have for too long been deceived by such arguments. Why don't the big government spenders honestly admit an awful lot of spending goes to waste? Recently,a former head of the HSE said that throwing more billions at it wouldn't improve the hospital services.
Ireland's extreme proportional representation voting system and resulting weak coalition governments are to blame, incentivising politicians to prioritise short termism, village pump politics and caving in to extravagant public sector pay deals. Long term planning essential for delivery of an efficient social welfare state is conducted on the hoof. For instance, budgets for housing disappear in economic recessions instead of being used as an efficient contracyclical economic stimulus. Spending per capita for university students has fallen about 40% in the past decade, so it's shouldn't be surprising that Cork University's international ranking has collapsed. Spending on basic infrastructure is among the lowest internationally as a percent of the economy,a few years ago as low as impoverished African countries.
In the 1950s, Taoiseach Eamon DeValera described coalition government resulting from proportional representation voting as similar to spancelled goats who stumbled along, their legs tied to prevent them from straying as they grazed on grass by the roadsides in rural Ireland. His solution,Fianna Fail's 1950s proposal for first past the post voting,was rejected in a referedum because people felt it would give FF too many government majorities and voters seemed to like the broad choices of PR. But DeValera's colourful criticism is still valid.
Disillusionment with establishment political parties gathered strength in the recent general election as voters lost faith in their capacity to govern altruistically in the national interest instead of grubbing for votes. The swing to Sinn Fein seems to be a protest vote but in the next election voters may foolishly come to believe SF is capable of altruism and will set aside its obsession with nationalism.
The only hope for long term political stability is a constitutional change to promote long term government planning. My simple suggestion is to limit the choice of votes on ballot papers to two of the available choices.That would allow more room for minority parties than the UK's FPTP system but would stop the descent to a parliament of ever more numerous squabbling parties.
Tax cuts rank low on the Irish public's political priorities even though tax increases are often wasted.
 

McTell

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No
OP

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My simple suggestion is to limit the choice of votes on ballot papers to two of the available choices.That would allow more room for minority parties than the UK's FPTP system but would stop the descent to a parliament of ever more numerous squabbling parties.

Give it to me straight, like a pear cider that's made out of 100% pears.
 

wombat

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Tax cuts rank low on the Irish public's political priorities even though tax increases are often wasted.
I think SFs promise to cut tax for everyone except the other guy worked a treat. :LOL:
 

Patslatt1

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Sinn Fein's populist promises con their voters that the small number of seriously rich will pay for everything. In practice, the already overtaxed upper income groups would be hit hard and multinationals would lose their tax breaks. Then the silly young SF voters would be "gone Tingland" to look for work in the ensuing economic recession.
 

Lumpy Talbot

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No
If all the working poor and unemployed poor were machine-gunned Pat would our bond yield spread improve?
 

Lumpy Talbot

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No
I well recall that hero of Irish governance Sean Fitzpatrick on his hind legs complaining about the cost of single mothers to the state. Although what that would have to do with a bank Chairman is unclear.

And this was shortly before said bank blew up and cost Irish taxpayers a whole new national debt that the single mothers of Eireann couldn't have reached in another century.
 

omgsquared

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first thing to do and something that will have minimal negative political impact is reduce the DFA Irish Aid budget by 60% . to be further reduced to about 10% of what it is today. This will save half a billion in year one. and over a period of 10 years about ten billion. . Then use a 100m or so of that savings to introduce a more robust immigration policy enforcement and a fast track asylum application system. This will also save millions on direct provision costs , allow genuine asylum seekers to have their cases heard and allow them take up work etc. It will also allow for rapid deportation of chancers.
This would b the first and easiest step in improving state governance .
 

Patslatt1

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I well recall that hero of Irish governance Sean Fitzpatrick on his hind legs complaining about the cost of single mothers to the state. Although what that would have to do with a bank Chairman is unclear.

And this was shortly before said bank blew up and cost Irish taxpayers a whole new national debt that the single mothers of Eireann couldn't have reached in another century.
What has that got to do with mediocre governance of the state? Single mother welfare costs are a tiny percentage of the state budget.
 

Patslatt1

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first thing to do and something that will have minimal negative political impact is reduce the DFA Irish Aid budget by 60% . to be further reduced to about 10% of what it is today. This will save half a billion in year one. and over a period of 10 years about ten billion. . Then use a 100m or so of that savings to introduce a more robust immigration policy enforcement and a fast track asylum application system. This will also save millions on direct provision costs , allow genuine asylum seekers to have their cases heard and allow them take up work etc. It will also allow for rapid deportation of chancers.
This would b the first and easiest step in improving state governance .
Irish foreign aid should be cut if it isn't productive.
Human rights law prevents swift deportations of economic migrants in most countries ,although the UK Tories are sending dog whistles to racists by deporting Carribbean born criminals who were raised in the UK since childhood. The FG led government sent a dog whistle by deporting a young Nigerian born criminal raised here since age eleven or younger.
 

Lumpy Talbot

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What has that got to do with mediocre governance of the state? Single mother welfare costs are a tiny percentage of the state budget.
It was enough to put Sean Fitzpatrick on his hind legs on the issue, not long before his bank and its board came close to destroying the Irish economy altogether.

My point is that the last people who should be heard on social issues are bankers and other professional liars.
 

ShoutingIsLeadership

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I think SFs promise to cut tax for everyone except the other guy worked a treat. :LOL:
Can you outline the SF and FG proposals so that I can compare them and make a fair assessment of your comment, please?
Thanks.
 

ShoutingIsLeadership

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Sinn Fein's populist promises con their voters that the small number of seriously rich will pay for everything. In practice, the already overtaxed upper income groups would be hit hard and multinationals would lose their tax breaks. Then the silly young SF voters would be "gone Tingland" to look for work in the ensuing economic recession.
Details, please.
 

Lumpy Talbot

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No
Never seen anyone treating the politics of their society only through the prism of a 'market' before. It isn't actually that pleasant. It is like a mash-up between Alexa and IBEC.
 

james toney

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Can you outline the SF and FG proposals so that I can compare them and make a fair assessment of your comment, please?
Thanks.
They will try and spin it...but Fine Gael supporters won't call themselves liars.
Just one of the reasons they suffered humiliation at the ballot box was their policy of the State pension rising to 66 and 67......leaving retirees out of pocket.
Couldn't have banks...bondholders...vulture funds,landlords and millionaires paying more tax though.
 

Patslatt1

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Details, please.
Spending policies of many past governments that ended in tears:Jack Lynch's 1970s abolition of rates on houses and taxes on cars that drove PAYE taxes sky high in compensation; Garret Fitzgerald's government spending of over half the economy for meagre welfare state results and 65% marginal taxes on average wages;and Bertie's reckless spending in an economic bubble to win a third term general election.
"Gone Tingland" for work was the result of those policies.
 

Patslatt1

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Never seen anyone treating the politics of their society only through the prism of a 'market' before. It isn't actually that pleasant. It is like a mash-up between Alexa and IBEC.
Economics is about utilisation of scarce resources. Extravagant political promises try to ignore this scarcity or spin the extravagance as a fight for equality and social justice.
 


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