Inadequate supply of infrastructure and tax rates stops Ireland moving up further - Global Competitiveness Report

Voluntary

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Inadequate supply of infrastructure and tax rates stops Ireland moving up further - Global Competitiveness Report

The World Economic Forum released its latest Global Competitiveness Report on the state of the world's economies.

The Ireland scored 23rd place. Not bad, but the major negative conclusion was that "Inadequate supply of infrastructure and tax rates stops Ireland moving up further."


Most problematic factors for doing business in Ireland:
1. Inadequate supply of infrastructure
2. Tax rates
3. Access to financing


Global Competitiveness Index - Reports - World Economic Forum


Will the government learn anything from these findings and address the most apparent issues in the coming budget?
 


wexfordman

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No
 

Mad as Fish

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The World Economic Forum released its latest Global Competitiveness Report on the state of the world's economies.

The Ireland scored 23rd place. Not bad, but the major negative conclusion was that "Inadequate supply of infrastructure and tax rates stops Ireland moving up further."


Most problematic factors for doing business in Ireland:
1. Inadequate supply of infrastructure
2. Tax rates
3. Access to financing


Global Competitiveness Index - Reports - World Economic Forum


Will the government learn anything from these findings and address the most apparent issues in the coming budget?
Anybody taking bets on who will be the first shill to start screaming that water charges are the answer?
 

Spanner Island

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The World Economic Forum released its latest Global Competitiveness Report on the state of the world's economies.

The Ireland scored 23rd place. Not bad, but the major negative conclusion was that "Inadequate supply of infrastructure and tax rates stops Ireland moving up further."


Most problematic factors for doing business in Ireland:
1. Inadequate supply of infrastructure
2. Tax rates
3. Access to financing


Global Competitiveness Index - Reports - World Economic Forum


Will the government learn anything from these findings and address the most apparent issues in the coming budget?
Infrastructure - I'm assuming that's broadband and some transport short comings... e.g. no joined up thinking on transport in Dublin and no rail link to Dublin Airport which catered for 25 million last year and looks set to smash that number this year. How does Dublin Airport function during bus strikes?

Motorway infrastructure is good for a country our size... and rail probably covers where it should based on our population density and spread? Our water infrastructure is dodgy though... obviously.

Tax rates - what's that about? Individual tax burden which is considerable despite the spin otherwise. Or corporate?

Access to financing - well... yeah... our banks are sh!te.


I see on corruption we score 0.0 which is a surprise... :cool:

Will the government learn anything? Nah.
 

Socratus O' Pericles

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One thing I will say about Ireland ( tangential to this I feel) is that rights to private property which are virtually unrestricted have quite a negative impact on infrastructure provision. Inability to tax land effectively and a 19th century public purchase system are two examples of this.
 
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Roll_On

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'restrictive labour practices' is scumbag spraken for how much abuse you can dish out to workers and get away with.

Infrastructure in Ireland is terrible. The main cities have little to no useable public transport. Motorways have nearly total pop coverage though. And some intercity rail lines could do with some renovation.
 

Notachipanoaktree

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The World Economic Forum released its latest Global Competitiveness Report on the state of the world's economies.

The Ireland scored 23rd place. Not bad, but the major negative conclusion was that "Inadequate supply of infrastructure and tax rates stops Ireland moving up further."


Most problematic factors for doing business in Ireland:
1. Inadequate supply of infrastructure
2. Tax rates
3. Access to financing


Global Competitiveness Index - Reports - World Economic Forum


Will the government learn anything from these findings and address the most apparent issues in the coming budget?
I suggest you start looking for a bit of Lebansraum. England looks rife for invasion. Perhaps some tablets for your psychopathy wouldn't go amiss. Some slaves eh? That seems to work a treat? We could use the navy in the med to hijack some of those boat loads of Africans or ask Angela to send us her overflow.

Study notes: The Dunning-Kruger Effect: Ye fuc*kin nut.

 

Voluntary

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Infrastructure - I'm assuming that's broadband and some transport short comings... e.g. no joined up thinking on transport in Dublin and no rail link to Dublin Airport which catered for 25 million last year and looks set to smash that number this year. How does Dublin Airport function during bus strikes?

Motorway infrastructure is good for a country our size... and rail probably covers where it should based on our population density and spread? Our water infrastructure is dodgy though... obviously.

Tax rates - what's that about? Individual tax burden which is considerable despite the spin otherwise. Or corporate?

Access to financing - well... yeah... our banks are sh!te.


I see on corruption we score 0.0 which is a surprise... :cool:

Will the government learn anything? Nah.
You can dig into details, but regarding taxes Ireland scored particularly bad on 'Effect of taxation on incentive to work' however we scored very well on 'Effect of taxation on incentive to invest'
 

shiel

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The infrastructure would be better and the taxes would be lower if the country was not bankrupt by the reckless decisions of a small number of its own most powerful citizens during the pre-2009 boom.

Some of them same citizens are still around complaining about the consequences of their own actions and blaming everyone else.
 

Voluntary

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The infrastructure would be better and the taxes would be lower if the country was not bankrupt by the reckless decisions of a small number of its own most powerful citizens during the pre-2009 boom.

Some of them same citizens are still around complaining about the consequences of their own actions and blaming everyone else.
Discussing reasons of why this or why that is a different topic.
The question here is: what should we be doing now to address these imperfections.
 

patslatt

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Discussing reasons of why this or why that is a different topic.
The question here is: what should we be doing now to address these imperfections.
FREEZE PUBLIC SECTOR PAY AND CUT TAXES
Public sector pay should be frozen for maybe a decade to allow private sector pay to grow faster and narrow the huge gap. Not only is public sector pay nearly half as high again as the private sector's average pay, but the public sector at the top half of the pay scale enjoy great pensions no longer available in the private sector except to top executives.

Such a pay freeze would create the savings needed to lower punitive income tax rates on the squeezed private sector middle income workers without cutting social services.

But instead of the pay freeze, if the government caves to Dublin Bus strikes and Garda GRA talk about industrial action, another wave of totally unjustified pay increases could occur across the public sector.

By the way, since the established garda labour force (along with nurses and teachers) saved their own pay and pensions at the expense of lower pay and pensions for new recruits, the solution to young garda pay could be a reversal of that union deal-pay rises for the new recruits in the past five years or so at the expense of a wage freeze for the better paid established work force.
 

shiel

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Discussing reasons of why this or why that is a different topic.
The question here is: what should we be doing now to address these imperfections.
The bankrupting of the country during the pre-2009 boom was not an 'imperfection'.

It was the biggest calamity to be inflicted on this country by a small number of its own most powerful citizens since independence.

Many of these powerful people are still demanding daily a repeat of the policies that bankrupt the country.

As in celtic tiger boom times they are again unchallenged now in the Irish media making similar demands as they did when they bankrupt the country.

Basic to addressing the problems caused by the recklessness of the celtic tiger few is not repeating their recklessness.
 
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Trainwreck

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The World Economic Forum released its latest Global Competitiveness Report on the state of the world's economies.

The Ireland scored 23rd place. Not bad, but the major negative conclusion was that "Inadequate supply of infrastructure and tax rates stops Ireland moving up further."


Most problematic factors for doing business in Ireland:
1. Inadequate supply of infrastructure
2. Tax rates
3. Access to financing


Global Competitiveness Index - Reports - World Economic Forum


Will the government learn anything from these findings and address the most apparent issues in the coming budget?

Oh FFS.

Ignore this ridiculous "Global Competitiveness Report". It is a fúkcing marketing tool
 

shiel

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Oh FFS.

Ignore this ridiculous "Global Competitiveness Report". It is a fúkcing marketing tool
International comparisons based on peer reviewed research has more credibility than the bollixes who want to repeat the recklessness of the celtic tiger and bankrupt the country again.
 

Trainwreck

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International comparisons based on peer reviewed research has more credibility than the bollixes who want to repeat the recklessness of the celtic tiger and bankrupt the country again.
Nonsense.

Arbitrary measures of things of unmeasurable significance.

And you reckon a score and ranking can be placed on it.

Twaddle.


For example:

11th pillar: Business sophistication

Business sophistication concerns two elements that are intricately linked: the quality of a country’s overall business networks and the quality of individual firms’ operations and strategies.
Absolute nonsense to pretend you can mark and rank across economies.
 

shiel

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Nonsense.
Arbitrary measures of things of unmeasurable significance.
And you reckon a score and ranking can be placed on it.
Twaddle.
For example:
Absolute nonsense to pretend you can mark and rank across economies.
Some issues are more measurable than others.

Many of the figures are freely available and can throw light on mistakes being made.

We owe it to taxpayers to tell them how public policy is doing in international forums.

But doing comparisons across countries based on peer reviewed research has more credibility than just emotionally screaming 'twaddle' and 'absolute nonsense' and such.
 

shiel

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Nonsense.

Arbitrary measures of things of unmeasurable significance.

And you reckon a score and ranking can be placed on it.
Twaddle.
For example:
Absolute nonsense to pretend you can mark and rank across economies.
Interesting figure that I posted on a different thread but is also relevant here.

According to OECD Ireland had by far the largest increase in 'General government compensation of employees as a % of GDP between 2000 and 2009'.

It increased from 8% to 13% of GDP in that period in Ireland while the overall OECD average increased by someting like 1% over the same period.

Illustrates the bad decisions of the celtic tiger period.
 


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