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Individualistic vs Collectivistic cultures and their bearing on integration.


Ruff says Flaherty

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 18, 2011
Messages
1,505
The immigrant population of Ireland currently stands in and around 15% of total population. We are constantly hearing buzz words in the media such as; integration, assimilation, inclusion. But does the public at large understand all the challenges that those new (and not new) to the country experience? Ireland is seen as being an "individualist" culture, whilst some people coming here come from "collectivist" cultures. This brings great challenges for those coming here, and also those who can't name or understand the differences.

Anyways-what is an individualist culture? What is a collectivist culture? Though there are many versions of definitions.The following is representative:

An individualist culture is one in which people tend to view themselves as individuals and to emphasize the needs of individuals. In general, Western culture tends to be individualist.

A collectivist culture is one in which people tend to view themselves as members of groups( families, work units, tribes, nations), and usually consider the needs of the group to be more important than the needs of individuals. Most Asian cultures, including China's, tend to be collectivist.

As a member of either an individualist or collectivist culture, what is your understanding of the two cultures?
What can be done so that it is easier for people to be integrated?

Ireland is a multicultural society now, that's not going to change and it isn't going away. How should we enable others to feel a sense of belonging here, and as a result feel more comfortable here ourselves?
 

R3volution_R3ady

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 17, 2012
Messages
2,370
My definition of the individual is drastically different to yours so.
 

Quadrangle

Member
Joined
Jan 29, 2013
Messages
81
I don't really think of Ireland as being very individualist. There are an awful lot of people who expect that I give them over 50% of my salary to pay for their children, rent, etc.
 

Mercurial

Moderator
Joined
Jun 4, 2009
Messages
88,215
I don't think it's plausible to say that cultures are either individualist of collectivistic. The emphases might be different, but there's too much variation within any culture to call it one or the other.
 

Verhofstadt

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Joined
Jun 7, 2007
Messages
6,196
Website
********************
I don't think it's plausible to say that cultures are either individualist of collectivistic. The emphases might be different, but there's too much variation within any culture to call it one or the other.
Agreed.. what about the ol' GAA?
 

Telemachus

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 8, 2004
Messages
6,565
Website
en.wikipedia.org
The immigrant population of Ireland currently stands in and around 15% of total population.
Its actually 17% at the very least as of 2011. I wonder can Shatman get it to 20%.
 

Ribeye

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 12, 2011
Messages
26,306
The immigrant population of Ireland currently stands in and around 15% of total population. We are constantly hearing buzz words in the media such as; integration, assimilation, inclusion. But does the public at large understand all the challenges that those new (and not new) to the country experience? Ireland is seen as being an "individualist" culture, whilst some people coming here come from "collectivist" cultures. This brings great challenges for those coming here, and also those who can't name or understand the differences.

Anyways-what is an individualist culture? What is a collectivist culture? Though there are many versions of definitions.The following is representative:

An individualist culture is one in which people tend to view themselves as individuals and to emphasize the needs of individuals. In general, Western culture tends to be individualist.

A collectivist culture is one in which people tend to view themselves as members of groups( families, work units, tribes, nations), and usually consider the needs of the group to be more important than the needs of individuals. Most Asian cultures, including China's, tend to be collectivist.

As a member of either an individualist or collectivist culture, what is your understanding of the two cultures?
What can be done so that it is easier for people to be integrated?

Ireland is a multicultural society now, that's not going to change and it isn't going away. How should we enable others to feel a sense of belonging here, and as a result feel more comfortable here ourselves?
 

Ribeye

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 12, 2011
Messages
26,306
Here's an example of what they do with bags of taxpayers money in your so called "individualistic" country, read it and weep, I'v bolded the bits I found particularly funny, and braindead,

Chinese Takeaway meal for one contains enough food for two people



28 Sept 2012. Eating a typical Chinese takeaway meal of a starter, main course and egg fried rice can contain much more calories than an adult’s total daily requirements and one and a half times their recommended maximum level of salt according to a new report¹ by safefood. In addition, some Chinese takeaway starter dishes provided a third of an adult’s total daily calorie requirement. The research is the latest in a series of reviews of takeaway foods and continues safefood’s work in helping consumers make more informed choices when eating food prepared outside the home.

Commenting on the research, Dr Cliodhna Foley-Nolan, Director, Human Health & Nutrition, safefood said:
Although traditional Chinese food is healthy, being low in fat and with a strong emphasis on vegetables, chefs here have adapted their recipes to suit local taste buds as their dishes have become more popular. With our taste buds in the West favouring foods which are high in fat, salt and sugar and because we eat bigger portions, Chinese dishes have become less healthy over time. While it is encouraging that almost two thirds (62%) of people regard Chinese takeaway as a treat², portion sizes are unnecessarily generous and not healthy”.

The safefood research which sampled 220 Chinese meal items from 35 outlets on the island of Ireland also found:

There was a major difference in the portion size of starters sold, with a five-fold difference among Prawn crackers and a three-fold difference in portions of Won Tons and Vegetable Spring Rolls.
An average portion (104g) of Prawn Crackers contained 608 calories, almost a third of an adults’ guideline daily amount.
Salt levels are considerably high, with all main courses tested containing more than half of an adults’ total guideline daily amount (6g) and in some instances, exceeding it.
The average rice portion was 359g which is sufficient for two adults
The average portion of egg fried rice contained 727 calories, representing more than a third of an adults’ guideline daily amount
“Consumer research² tells us that more than half (54%) of consumers choose egg fried rice (727 calorie average) and we know that a main dish served with this can result in a person consuming between 1300 and 1800 calories. And that’s before we even begin to consider all the other foods we’ve eaten during the day”, continued Dr Foley-Nolan. “However, there are plenty of healthy Chinese takeaway options available and people should consider sharing dishes when ordering to ensure appropriate portion size.”

Consumer research² by safefood also found almost half of people (47%) always order the same Chinese dish and 68% eat their meal in full, in one sitting.

The survey is the latest in a series of nutritional surveys commissioned by safefood looking at popular takeaway foods. Previous surveys have looked at Chicken & Potato products; Salt levels in Takeaway Soup; takeaway & shop-bought pizzas and; takeaway burgers.
Meanwhile, Irish people queue at foodbanks,

Ireland is a collectivist state, and it will end up where all collectivist states end up,
 
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