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Internet Censorship: Government Controlled Web


Factorem

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 15, 2008
Messages
568
I believe it's only a matter of time before we get Chinese-style firewalls in the EU and the USA.

All websites will eventually be forced into registering with an "authority" and if they operate "illegally", they'll be shut down/blocked.

I'm sure the established media would love this (as would the politicians) and they can go back to deceiving the public en-masse as they have always done.

The EU are already preparing laws and infrastructure to enable this. Yet another reason to vote 'No' to Lisbon.
 

Defeated

New member
Joined
Jan 7, 2009
Messages
3
It all depends on the level of censorship that is applied. If it makes the internet a safer place then it's a good thing. If it helps to stop phishing attacks, spammers, fraudsters, etc then I'm all for it.... as I'm sure whoever runs this forum would be.
 

Electro

Member
Joined
May 6, 2007
Messages
91
For personal computers, you just need the right firewall software and be careful about what you download.

For Internet sites, you need good security arrangements. In any event there's no real way of blocking a determined hacker/DoSer.

So in both cases security is not a valid reason for Governments censoring political speech.

Not that it won't be touted as a reason for Australian-style Western Internet censorship.
 

ArtyQueing

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 2, 2008
Messages
302
The announcement that the British want every sms, email, website visited, called, texted recorded is very worrying.

They presume everyone is guilty abd so everyone has to be tracked, this must not happen in Ireland as it is a threat to our personal liberty, never trust any government, they have a power which can be abused.

If you are saying that we should be able to control what our children have access to then I approve, beyond that is dangerous territory indeed.
 

20000miles

Active member
Joined
Aug 14, 2008
Messages
257
Website
www.irishliberty.wordpress.com
Heres a link to the story:

BBC NEWS | UK | UK e-mail law 'attack on rights'

Rules forcing internet companies to keep details of every e-mail sent in the UK are a waste of money and an attack on civil liberties, say critics.
From March all internet service providers (ISPs) will by law have to keep information about every e-mail sent or received in the UK for a year.
Human rights group Liberty says it is worried what will happen next.
The Home Office insists the data, which does not include e-mails' content, is vital for crime and terror inquiries.
Some three billion e-mails are thought to be sent each day in the UK. ...
Worrying indeed.
 

CookieMonster

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 19, 2005
Messages
34,801
I believe it's only a matter of time before we get Chinese-style firewalls in the EU and the USA.

All websites will eventually be forced into registering with an "authority" and if they operate "illegally", they'll be shut down/blocked.

I'm sure the established media would love this (as would the politicians) and they can go back to deceiving the public en-masse as they have always done.

The EU are already preparing laws and infrastructure to enable this. Yet another reason to vote 'No' to Lisbon.
Well I don't wish to believe that it will happen, that said we need not worry. Given the EU's last misadventure into the internet didn't really work out too well I think we'll be fine.
 

CookieMonster

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 19, 2005
Messages
34,801
Heres a link to the story:

BBC NEWS | UK | UK e-mail law 'attack on rights'



Worrying indeed.
Indeed.

The following was posted by Barry in the Civil Liberties social group.

British Police set to step up hacking of home PCs
David Leppard | January 05, 2009

THE Home Office has quietly adopted a new plan to allow police across Britain routinely to hack into people's personal computers without a warrant.
The move, which follows a decision by the European Union’s council of ministers in Brussels, has angered civil liberties groups and opposition MPs. They described it as a sinister extension of the surveillance state which drives “a coach and horses” through privacy laws.

The hacking is known as “remote searching”. It allows police or MI5 officers who may be hundreds of miles away to examine covertly the hard drive of someone’s PC at his home, office or hotel room.

Material gathered in this way includes the content of all e-mails, web-browsing habits and instant messaging.

Under the Brussels edict, police across the EU have been given the green light to expand the implementation of a rarely used power involving warrantless intrusive surveillance of private property. The strategy will allow French, German and other EU forces to ask British officers to hack into someone’s UK computer and pass over any material gleaned.

A remote search can be granted if a senior officer says he “believes” that it is “proportionate” and necessary to prevent or detect serious crime - defined as any offence attracting a jail sentence of more than three years.

However, opposition MPs and civil liberties groups say that the broadening of such intrusive surveillance powers should be regulated by a new act of parliament and court warrants.

They point out that in contrast to the legal safeguards for searching a suspect’s home, police undertaking a remote search do not need to apply to a magistrates’ court for a warrant.

Shami Chakrabarti, director of Liberty, the human rights group, said she would challenge the legal basis of the move. “These are very intrusive powers – as intrusive as someone busting down your door and coming into your home,” she said.

“The public will want this to be controlled by new legislation and judicial authorisation. Without those safeguards it’s a devastating blow to any notion of personal privacy.”

She said the move had parallels with the warrantless police search of the House of Commons office of Damian Green, the Tory MP: “It’s like giving police the power to do a Damian Green every day but to do it without anyone even knowing you were doing it.”

Richard Clayton, a researcher at Cambridge University’s computer laboratory, said that remote searches had been possible since 1994, although they were very rare. An amendment to the Computer Misuse Act 1990 made hacking legal if it was authorised and carried out by the state.

He said the authorities could break into a suspect’s home or office and insert a “key-logging” device into an individual’s computer. This would collect and, if necessary, transmit details of all the suspect’s keystrokes. “It’s just like putting a secret camera in someone’s living room,” he said.

Police might also send an e-mail to a suspect’s computer. The message would include an attachment that contained a virus or “malware”. If the attachment was opened, the remote search facility would be covertly activated. Alternatively, police could park outside a suspect’s home and hack into his or her hard drive using the wireless network.

Police say that such methods are necessary to investigate suspects who use cyberspace to carry out crimes. These include paedophiles, internet fraudsters, identity thieves and terrorists.

The Association of Chief Police Officers (Acpo) said such intrusive surveillance was closely regulated under the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act. A spokesman said police were already carrying out a small number of these operations which were among 194 clandestine searches last year of people’s homes, offices and hotel bedrooms.

“To be a valid authorisation, the officer giving it must believe that when it is given it is necessary to prevent or detect serious crime and (the) action is proportionate to what it seeks to achieve,” Acpo said.

Dominic Grieve, the shadow home secretary, agreed that the development may benefit law enforcement. But he added: “The exercise of such intrusive powers raises serious privacy issues. The government must explain how they would work in practice and what safeguards will be in place to prevent abuse.”

The Home Office said it was working with other EU states to develop details of the proposals.

The Times

(He didn't give a URL for the story, hence me posting the full text, if anybody can provide it I will edit)
 

Christine Murray

Well-known member
Joined
May 5, 2008
Messages
635
Website
www.poethead.wordpress.com
Digital Rights Ireland

Digital Rights Ireland has a good archive on the issues, which takes in the TDR
legislations. Also many of the Irish issues which are not widely known were
covered by Karen Lillington in the I.T Backpages and can also be found in the archives..

I do not have a cache link handy.

http://www.digitalrights.ie/ = DRI
 
Last edited:

garlandgreen

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 14, 2008
Messages
869
The Australians I remember hearing a while back tried to but up a firewall and invested many millions in the system. Once it went live it managed to protect the Australian people from inappropriate material without being hacked or brought down...

....for a grand total of 27 minutes.
 

setanta

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 2, 2004
Messages
649
I believe it's only a matter of time before we get Chinese-style firewalls in the EU and the USA.

All websites will eventually be forced into registering with an "authority" and if they operate "illegally", they'll be shut down/blocked.

I'm sure the established media would love this (as would the politicians) and they can go back to deceiving the public en-masse as they have always done.

The EU are already preparing laws and infrastructure to enable this. Yet another reason to vote 'No' to Lisbon.
That is another NO side lie.
 

seabhcan

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 3, 2007
Messages
14,327
The Australians I remember hearing a while back tried to but up a firewall and invested many millions in the system. Once it went live it managed to protect the Australian people from inappropriate material without being hacked or brought down...

....for a grand total of 27 minutes.
Most countries seem to have a secret list of websites that they encourage their isps to block. Denmark's list of about 2,000 sites (almost entirely child porn sites) was leaked on wikileaks.

Thailand's list was also leaked. The list started as a list of child porn sites, but then anti-government news sites started to be added one by one. Now its about 50% political.
 

garlandgreen

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 14, 2008
Messages
869
They are inneffective. It's as easy as when one site is banned to post the offending material on an unbanned site. One national quango versus billions of users. Not a hope. This is grandstanding. They know they can't do anything about it
 

seabhcan

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 3, 2007
Messages
14,327
They are inneffective. It's as easy as when one site is banned to post the offending material on an unbanned site. One national quango versus billions of users. Not a hope. This is grandstanding. They know they can't do anything about it
I wouldn't be surprised if Ireland already has a list of banned sites. You could test this theory by going to wikileaks and getting the list of sites banned in denmark. We probably have an identical list. Try opening some of the websites listed.

If they don't load, it means Ireland has a secret list of banned sites. If they do load, it means you have broken Irish law by looking at a child porn site.

(or you could ping them, which will probably answer the question without breaking the law)
 

RasherHash

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 16, 2013
Messages
24,901
Nationalise the internet

Interesting discussion just now on BBCs, Any Questions? about net censorship.

The RT presenter, Afshin Rattansi, made an great point, there is no internet 'freedom' at the minute, it is controlled by 4 US companies.

He made the point that to bring real democratic accountability you need to nationalise the internet.
 

Old Mr Grouser

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 29, 2009
Messages
6,490
...
THE Home Office has quietly adopted a new plan to allow police across Britain routinely to hack into people's personal computers without a warrant.

The move, which follows a decision by the European Union’s council of ministers in Brussels, has angered civil liberties groups and opposition MPs. They described it as a sinister extension of the surveillance state which drives “a coach and horses” through privacy laws ...
There's never a mention there that the crooks can do the same thing, and that's what people should be most worried about, and be gaurding against.

Criminals can park outiside your house and hijack your home router - Your home router may be the least secure device in your home

And they can clone your debit-cards and credit-cards having obtained the details by walking past you - Contactless card fraud overtakes cheque scams for first time
 
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