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Interview with Dr. Conor McCabe about the southern Irish economy since partition.


F

fistikuffs

Cheers, love these podcasts. Looking forward to listening on the way home from work tomorrow.
 

patslatt

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cb1979

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Could you summarise the key points,please?
Basically the interview covers a lot of the same points that McCabe made in his book The Sins of the Father. It's an excellent book and well worth a read. McCabe points out that after the Anglo - Irish Treaty nothing really changed in the economic relationship between the UK and Ireland. Banking and currency policy was completely abdicated to the private banks and the decision to peg the punt to sterling at 1:1 was a mind boggling decision that made credit very expensive in Ireland preventing expansion of Irish industry.

The economy was geared towards the export of live cattle. This was beneficial to the large ranchers and graziers but put almost all the risk on the shoulders of the small farmers who reared calves up to the age of one year old and they were then forced to sell them at low prices. If the cattle would have been slaughtered in Ireland, it would have led to jobs being created in meat processing and tanneries etc. instead of Irish people having to emigrate to Britain to work in factories where Irish cattle were being processed.

He also challenges some of the orthodoxies regarding economic history for example TK Whitaker and Seán Lemass transformed the Irish economy, entering the EU was an unqualified success and that no one could predict that the Euro would fail. There's also discussion about the IFSC and it's role in the Irish economy. I'm probably not doing his views justice in attempting to summarise it but he has a blog here Dublin Opinion which is worth a look and I'd be very interested in posters' views on the interview.
 

ON THE ONE ROAD

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listening to it now. sounds good. probably nitpicking but if iam picking him up right he is putting irelands inability to critisise our economic relationship with britain and europe down to the troubles and that to suggest a post colonial analasie would subject one to being labeled a provo. bar the eu that inability which he proves seems to have been there for a lot longer than that. read his book. found it interesting and would say he is probably right. his book and his findings are worthy of more discussion but again there is that inability to talk about things.
 

cb1979

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listening to it now. sounds good. probably nitpicking but if iam picking him up right he is putting irelands inability to critisise our economic relationship with britain and europe down to the troubles and that to suggest a post colonial analasie would subject one to being labeled a provo. bar the eu that inability which he proves seems to have been there for a lot longer than that. read his book. found it interesting and would say he is probably right. his book and his findings are worthy of more discussion but again there is that inability to talk about things.

I think he also ties the issue of the Troubles into the problems with Irish historiography and the debates about revisionism. I attended several public debates leading up to the Nice and Lisbon treaties and there was a palpable anger that anyone would dare criticise the EU and if you questioned the economic and political direction that the EU was going towards you were a little Irelander and an ultra nationalist who wanted a return to a de Valera, comely maidens Ireland of the 1950s. The lack of in depth analysis of the European project in the main stream media is shocking.
 

anationoceagain

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I think he also ties the issue of the Troubles into the problems with Irish historiography and the debates about revisionism. I attended several public debates leading up to the Nice and Lisbon treaties and there was a palpable anger that anyone would dare criticise the EU and if you questioned the economic and political direction that the EU was going towards you were a little Irelander and an ultra nationalist who wanted a return to a de Valera, comely maidens Ireland of the 1950s. The lack of in depth analysis of the European project in the main stream media is shocking.
Indeed. I think a lot of this unquestioning of the EU stems from universities, where most courses offered a sanitised version of what Europe was. The elites approved and ensured that the project would be posited as a value free vision, free from messy ideologies.
 

ON THE ONE ROAD

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I think he also ties the issue of the Troubles into the problems with Irish historiography and the debates about revisionism. I attended several public debates leading up to the Nice and Lisbon treaties and there was a palpable anger that anyone would dare criticise the EU and if you questioned the economic and political direction that the EU was going towards you were a little Irelander and an ultra nationalist who wanted a return to a de Valera, comely maidens Ireland of the 1950s. The lack of in depth analysis of the European project in the main stream media is shocking.

yeah i campaigned against both of them and agree with you on the attitude but disagree that its some flaw individual to us. i don't believe most countries debate topics like this with an imbalance of power realationships in them in some sort of classical manner using the rules of logic. there is usually a lot of shouting and hitting people over the heads just like here. think the next post after you got closer to the nub of the problem. rather than the troubles its self leaving a scar. those who hold the means of production also hold the mental means of production. The EU give money to colleges, that influences the curriculum. Maybe iam misreading the short hand but the hand ringing over the troubles suggests that people where horrified by violence. to my memory people where horrified or the story was framed in such a way as to state that people where horrified by one side of the violence. there was a media embalence towards the status quo, towards the ones with the power. same with the EU debate. same reason why dr Mcabes book is not getting discussed in the mainstream media. it doesn't suit.
 
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cb1979

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yeah i campaigned against both of them and agree with you on the attitude but disagree that its some flaw individual to us. i don't believe most countries debate topics like this with an imbalance of power realationships in them in some sort of classical manner using the rules of logic. there is usually a lot of shouting and hitting people over the heads just like here. think the next post after you got closer to the nub of the problem. rather than the troubles its self leaving a scar. those who hold the means of production also hold the mental means of production. The EU give money to colleges, that influences the curriculum. Maybe iam misreading the short hand but the hand ringing over the troubles suggests that people where horrified by violence. to my memory people where horrified or the story was framed in such a way as to state that people where horrified by one side of the violence. there was a media embalence towards the status quo, there the ones with the power. same with the EU debate.
I completely agree with you and I don't think it is an attitude individual to Ireland either. The EU treaties saw Academia (as Anationonceagain mentioned), IBEC, the IFA, the leadership of the Trade Unions and the political parties line up behind a yes vote. This was the time we really needed a public service broadcaster and an independent media to vigorously question the European project and encourage a debate about issues such as the wisdom of adopting a single currency and the future of political integration. Unfortunately, those that raised important questions regarding the EU were dismissed as absolute cranks. After the first Nice referendum, RTÉ anointed Justin Barrett as the spokesman for the No side for the second referendum and he was never off the radio and television. There is a feeling that official Ireland knows best and you should keep your criticisms to yourself.
 

ON THE ONE ROAD

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I completely agree with you and I don't think it is an attitude individual to Ireland either. The EU treaties saw Academia (as Anationonceagain mentioned), IBEC, the IFA, the leadership of the Trade Unions and the political parties line up behind a yes vote. This was the time we really needed a public service broadcaster and an independent media to vigorously question the European project and encourage a debate about issues such as the wisdom of adopting a single currency and the future of political integration. Unfortunately, those that raised important questions regarding the EU were dismissed as absolute cranks. After the first Nice referendum, RTÉ anointed Justin Barrett as the spokesman for the No side for the second referendum and he was never off the radio and television. There is a feeling that official Ireland knows best and you should keep your criticisms to yourself.
ah defiantly. At the same time though Dr McCabe has come from academia and on the ground there is upwards of 30 to 40% people who consistently vote no in those referendums some times a majority. So there is some relative autonomy in action but definitely there is a dominant consensus. probably always will be regardless of who is at the top. maybe the healthiest thing is just to be aware of it. Alternative media like this site and near fm and good in that they publish ideas that can challenge the dominant that don't appear in main stream media.
 

cb1979

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[video=youtube;aMpBc-Xej8c]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aMpBc-Xej8c[/video]

Footage from the launch of the second edition of Sins of the Father in Liberty Hall.
 

tipp revolution

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I think he also ties the issue of the Troubles into the problems with Irish historiography and the debates about revisionism. I attended several public debates leading up to the Nice and Lisbon treaties and there was a palpable anger that anyone would dare criticise the EU and if you questioned the economic and political direction that the EU was going towards you were a little Irelander and an ultra nationalist who wanted a return to a de Valera, comely maidens Ireland of the 1950s. The lack of in depth analysis of the European project in the main stream media is shocking.
well just to throw an incendiary device into it Oi am reading JJ lees book on Ireland 1912-1985 and on that basis we should stand up to the Northern Protestants and should have at the time - they were basically bullies and interested in their own welfare only, and caused enormous trouble to save a few industries that are now gone?

I call for a new republic and to try our best to make it a 32 county one and economy proceed accordingly. The UK are screwing us royally for years with unbelievable exchange rates from UK to Irish companies. You know when you buy a uk mag and the cost is a lot more than the back of a fag packet translation rate - thats going on everywhere. going on for years, gay.

PS the maidens are getting too comely according to Paul Costelloe. He must have gone to the same marketing lectures as O Leary
 
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Fodhla Dhearg

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Sins of the Father is essential reading for anyone who wants an understanding of Irish life since the mid 19th century until the current collapse. I found gems on every single page of this book.
 
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