Ireland at level of complete ignorance on Cyber defence. Dependent on UK for security in general

robut

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Ireland 'naive' over possible fallout from Russian spy attack

Former deputy director of Military Intelligence Michael Murphy



"We do not have a civilian intelligence agency. We have Military Intelligence and we have Garda Intelligence.

"I'm hearing a lot that our European partners will be helping us as well in making that assessment. One has to understand that there is no such thing as a friendly foreign intelligence service - all intelligence services have a purpose and some foreign intelligence services have the purpose of the economic well being of their own country.

"So you cannot depend on foreign intelligence agencies to help your decision."

In his assessment of how ready Ireland would be to deal with any retaliation by Russia to such a move, Lt Col Murphy said that "we are at the naive, ignorant stage. We are very susceptible. We depend on the UK. We're not making our own decisions at this stage.

"If you take our Defence Forces, we don't even know what's in our own skies, we don't have the capability, so we depend on the UK to tell us that. And in our cyber-defence, we're at the level of complete ignorance in relation to cyber-defence."

He said there was an undue focus on embassy activity, and questioned the adequacy of Ireland's readiness to deal with cyber threats.

.... "You ask any Government minister, 'what is our budget for cyber defence?' They'll say 'it's over there in the Department of Communications' and probably farmed out to a civilian organisation at the moment.

Lt Col Murphy also raised concerns over high level data security and said that political decision makers were "not listening" to intelligence concerns.

He said: "We have Government ministers using commercial emails.

... He added: "When I left the army, we knew how serious a problem we have. Our people are trying to influence the decision makers. They're not listening. If the troubles in Europe continue at the level they are at and they are ratcheting up, we will discover how immature our system and our defence of this country is. We are at the lowest level possible."
And this in a country that prides itself in tech. Has many of the major largest world tech firms HQed here.

Apparently for last few weeks USA Homeland Security and CIA were over here because they are worried.

Micheal hits the nail on the head, spot on, Worth a read.
 


GDPR

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Everyone has hit Irish public bodies and private firms from the N Koreans to bitcoin miners.

There is no joined up cyber defence policy. Neutral countries do not get a pass on national security - in fact they usually place a real emphasis on protecting themselves.
 

robut

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Everyone has hit Irish public bodies and private firms from the N Koreans to bitcoin miners.

There is no joined up cyber defence policy. Neutral countries do not get a pass on national security - in fact they usually place a real emphasis on protecting themselves.
And again I reiterate from OP ... here we are, seeing ourselves as the tech hub of europe with hopeless cyber security and security in general. Totally dependent on the "goodness" of others. As michael said:

"I'm hearing a lot that our European partners will be helping us as well in making that assessment. One has to understand that there is no such thing as a friendly foreign intelligence service - all intelligence services have a purpose and some foreign intelligence services have the purpose of the economic well being of their own country.

"So you cannot depend on foreign intelligence agencies to help your decision."

In other wise intelligence from another country will always have a slant that suits THEM and not necessarily for our benefit either
 

Analyzer

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YAMFUBTIIS.

Yet
Another
Monumental
Fail Ure
By
The
Irish
Institutional
State.

To be followed (in an entirely predictable manner) by the Propaganda quango saying that either there is NO problem, or else that the problem arose due to "lack of resources".
 

GDPR

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And again I reiterate from OP ... here we are, seeing ourselves as the tech hub of europe with hopeless cyber security and security in general. Totally dependent on the "goodness" of others. As michael said:

"I'm hearing a lot that our European partners will be helping us as well in making that assessment. One has to understand that there is no such thing as a friendly foreign intelligence service - all intelligence services have a purpose and some foreign intelligence services have the purpose of the economic well being of their own country.

"So you cannot depend on foreign intelligence agencies to help your decision."

In other wise intelligence from another country will always have a slant that suits THEM and not necessarily for our benefit either
If they are helping you, it is only because they want a back-door into your systems. Ireland must have its own defences.
 

OrderoftheDragon

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Genuinely we are probably 20 years behind other nations when it comes to the cyber threat, but then looking at how the state dealt with the banking crisis......again way behind the curve.

We never do anything revolutionary as long as the vested interests are making a few quid, that's good enough for the establishment......
 

robut

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If they are helping you, it is only because they want a back-door into your systems. Ireland must have its own defences.
Which has me constantly questioning & wondering WHY Ireland is so attractive to this US Tech FDI if our security both cyber and general is woeful? Sod this line of the well educated workforce ...
 

GDPR

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Which has me constantly questioning & wondering WHY Ireland is so attractive to this US Tech FDI if our security both cyber and general is woeful? Sod this line of the well educated workforce ...
It is because this is aspect is out of our hands. This is precisely why Russia is now interested in us. Its a proxy war, and we are in the middle of it, not staying aloof, and looking out for ourselves.
 

Analyzer

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I am waiting on the Irish Looper Party to say that the problem is the internet.

Where is Ruairi Spin ?

And then we have the maFFia whose obsessin is shutting down free expression. Are they still in communication with Conor "free drinks all night (at the taxpayer's expense)" Lenihan, and Meehaul 'mega hotel bill' Martin.
 

wombat

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Anyone got an idea of what the actual threat is? What advantage is there to anyone in shutting down the electrical grid? Surely the banks protect their systems from fraud? Would they not employ better IT people than the state?
 

seanof

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Which has me constantly questioning & wondering WHY Ireland is so attractive to this US Tech FDI if our security both cyber and general is woeful? Sod this line of the well educated workforce ...
Maybe for that very reason. The US can control it themselves and to their own benefit, which they could not do in most developed countries.
 

seanof

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Anyone got an idea of what the actual threat is? What advantage is there to anyone in shutting down the electrical grid? Surely the banks protect their systems from fraud? Would they not employ better IT people than the state?
Everyone employs better IT people than the Irish State. The State is not prepared to pay staff adequately.
 

Iusedmename

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Which has me constantly questioning & wondering WHY Ireland is so attractive to this US Tech FDI if our security both cyber and general is woeful? Sod this line of the well educated workforce ...
I know absolutely nothing about cyber-security. Why would our government's cyber security have any impact on a private company's cyber-security?
 

boldfenianman

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I thought there were some major players in the field in Dublin such as Symantec and many others? Mostly US companies but Irish employees. And therein lies the key. I stand to be corrected I'm sure but Dublin holds some pretty nasty cyber tools. Probably why we don't bother with jets and things.
 

GDPR

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I know absolutely nothing about cyber-security. Why would our government's cyber security have any impact on a private company's cyber-security?
The govts role is to protect the national digital infrastructure for a start.

Also companies need help if they’re going to face adversaries who use nation-state attack techniques. Like Russia, which regularly pummels the Baltic countries, or N Korea which has ripped off Irish local govt and private businesses.
 

Civic_critic2

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Mr. Murphy sent out to contribute to the ratcheting up of tensions. It was the British in their parliament who threatened the Russians with a cyber attack.

Is 2006 so long ago? Then 2008 happened and since then the western 'leaders' have been busy creating war conditions and fears in an entirely depraved manner. That's all they have as a response to bankruptcy and challenge - oppression and war. And numbers of willing gofers to warble in favour of increasing tensions as if they are the put-upon virtuous ones.

Every state lies through its teeth in the lead-up to war and comes out with ridiculous assertions of how it's being provoked in order to justify the murder it has already decided it is going to engage in.
 


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