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Ireland did well in latest international survey of pupils' literacy,maths and science


patslatt

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See Irish students score above international average in maths, science, literacy - Irish Innovation News – Siliconrepublic.com and http://www.erc.ie/documents/pt_2011_flyer_achievement.pdf

While Ireland's performance of pupils was generally well above average in maths and science and excellent in reading,Northern Ireland did better in reading and maths than Ireland,while England did better in maths and science.Presumably,Ireland would do better than Northern Ireland and England in religion and a foreign language,the equivalent of Gaelic,if those were tested,given the disproportionately large amount of time devoted to them!
 

EndDiddlyaism

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Irish is part of who we are, we must spend more time teaching it to our kids. Kids just love Irish, this is so obvious from the success of Gaelscoileanna and how Irish can be heard flowing freely as the kids leave the school gates. Not only should it remain compulsory, all schools should be transitioned to Irish-medium in the next few years.
 

Asparagus

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17th out of 50 in maths

22nd out of 50 in science

Sing it from the roof tops - we are streets ahead of botswana and Laos.
We only trail all the so called "developed countries"

The teachers, hard pressed and completely committed to the job must be forced, begrudgingly to all get a pay hike.

Our Kids are not the dumbest on earth.
Doesn't that make your heart sing.

Hey Google.. we can math the hell out of sums..
 

greengoose2

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Irish is part of who we are, we must spend more time teaching it to our kids. Kids just love Irish, this is so obvious from the success of Gaelscoileanna and how Irish can be heard flowing freely as the kids leave the school gates. Not only should it remain compulsory, all schools should be transitioned to Irish-medium in the next few years.
Could you repeat that "as gaeilge" for the benefit of the kiddies flowing freely out of the school gates!
 

galteeman

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Irish is part of who we are, we must spend more time teaching it to our kids. Kids just love Irish, this is so obvious from the success of Gaelscoileanna and how Irish can be heard flowing freely as the kids leave the school gates. Not only should it remain compulsory, all schools should be transitioned to Irish-medium in the next few years.
who is we? speak for yourself, you sound like a fascist who wants to brainwash kids.
 

Asparagus

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Irish is part of who we are, we must spend more time teaching it to our kids. Kids just love Irish, this is so obvious from the success of Gaelscoileanna and how Irish can be heard flowing freely as the kids leave the school gates. Not only should it remain compulsory, all schools should be transitioned to Irish-medium in the next few years.
Irish is the language of the modern world. Its ridiculous that we don't teach our kids everything through it.
We should also teach them other non redundant and relevant languages such as morse code or Semiphore so they can signal "Goodbye" to all the Multinationals who leave because they haven't a clue what we are talking about.

I mean its nearly 1813.
 

galteeman

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potholedogger

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See Irish students score above international average in maths, science, literacy - Irish Innovation News – Siliconrepublic.com and http://www.erc.ie/documents/pt_2011_flyer_achievement.pdf

While Ireland's performance of pupils was generally well above average in maths and science and excellent in reading,Northern Ireland did better in reading and maths than Ireland,while England did better in maths and science.Presumably,Ireland would do better than Northern Ireland and England in religion and a foreign language,the equivalent of Gaelic,if those were tested,given the disproportionately large amount of time devoted to them!

Imagine how much our scores could be improved if the school year was extended by two weeks, and the time for religion and Irish was reduced by half?
 
D

Dylan2010

I must say I think the Irish primary syllabus is hopeless. My son in second class is just starting fractions , ie coloring in half or quarter of a box and they dont start multiplication until third class, he is so bored by the slow pace. Continental school dont go that slowly.
 

potholedogger

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I must say I think the Irish primary syllabus is hopeless. My son in second class is just starting fractions , ie coloring in half or quarter of a box and they dont start multiplication until third class, he is so bored by the slow pace. Continental school dont go that slowly.


It all seems to proceed at a pace suited to the weakest students.
 

EndDiddlyaism

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Irish is the language of the modern world. Its ridiculous that we don't teach our kids everything through it.
We should also teach them other non redundant and relevant languages such as morse code or Semiphore so they can signal "Goodbye" to all the Multinationals who leave because they haven't a clue what we are talking about.

I mean its nearly 1813.
Which is more important, pandering to the MNCs or retaining our national pride? 'Tir gan teanga, tir gan anam'. 'Anam', that links us to another cornerstone of who we Irish are, catholicism. Again, rather than cut back on hours teaching religion in school, there needs to be more time allocated to it so kids can receive the christian values that they need to make Ireland the nirvana it was in the good old days.
 

greengoose2

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Which is more important, pandering to the MNCs or retaining our national pride? 'Tir gan teanga, tir gan anam'. 'Anam', that links us to another cornerstone of who we Irish are, catholicism. Again, rather than cut back on hours teaching religion in school, there needs to be more time allocated to it so kids can receive the christian values that they need to make Ireland the nirvana it was in the good old days.
That can be translated to A country without its own language is a country without character.
 

McTell

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No
That can be translated to A country without its own language is a country without character.
That's not true of Belgium or the USA surely? Mexico? It's an 1800s concept that is long dead. Half the point of learning Irish after 1900 was to make us feel less tied to England, and the other half was to allow censorship. Of course it's ancestral and it's nice but it's not northwest Europe in 2013.
 

feargach

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That's not true of Belgium or the USA surely? Mexico? It's an 1800s concept that is long dead. Half the point of learning Irish after 1900 was to make us feel less tied to England, and the other half was to allow censorship. Of course it's ancestral and it's nice but it's not northwest Europe in 2013.
Not sure why you mention northwest Europe. All of Scandinavia cherishes its own languages, all the states in western continental Europe bar Belgium (a state which only exists because of imperial hangovers and catholic bigotry) are the same in promoting their indigenous tongue and using it to some appreciable extent as the language of national discourse.

Belgium's hardly a great standard to aspire to, is it? When a Fleming and a Walloon meet, they usually converse in English, because they are each too bigoted to speak the other one's tongue, even though they understand and speak both languages perfectly. That's like a Gael and an Anglophone meeting in Dublin and talking in Japanese.

Even the Swiss are happy to promote Romansh in the regions where it is indigenous.
 

McTell

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No
Not sure why you mention northwest Europe. All of Scandinavia cherishes its own languages, all the states in western continental Europe bar Belgium (a state which only exists because of imperial hangovers and catholic bigotry) are the same in promoting their indigenous tongue and using it to some appreciable extent as the language of national discourse.

Belgium's hardly a great standard to aspire to, is it? When a Fleming and a Walloon meet, they usually converse in English, because they are each too bigoted to speak the other one's tongue, even though they understand and speak both languages perfectly. That's like a Gael and an Anglophone meeting in Dublin and talking in Japanese.

Even the Swiss are happy to promote Romansh in the regions where it is indigenous.
We are in northwest Europe (when last sighted) and I'm all for Irish that - 1) is not compulsory 2) doesn't cost 2 Bn a year to a bankrupt country 3) is spoken by officialdom and TDs.

Why tax us for it and make it compulsory? "Do as I say not as I do". The Swiss have the right attitude but Romansh is not compulsory in all Swiss schools.
 
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