Ireland warned property slump looming


cozzy121

Well-known member
Joined
May 26, 2009
Messages
4,976
Roddy Doyle depicts Ireland's homeless crisis in new film Rosie | World news | The Guardian
Roddy Doyle hasn’t had a film out in almost two decades as the writer of The Commitments, The Snapper and Family has been focusing on his novels. But two years ago, Ireland’s laureate of working class drama heard a homeless mother in Dublin being interviewed on the radio.

The woman was describing her day, which had been spent calling hotels to find a room for her partner and their five kids to spend the night. It was a process she repeated every day.

Doyle put down the book he was working on and immediately started writing a treatment for Rosie, which opens in the UK on Friday.

“She mentioned that her partner had not been able to help her [look for a room] because he was at work, and that really made me think. This was a perfectly functional working class family doing what society would like them to do – he goes off to work and she looks after the children in that traditional way. And yet the one thing missing was a home,” Doyle told the Guardian.
With a bit of luck CEOs in London will think twice sending their employees over to such a country..
 

EUrJokingMeRight

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 28, 2009
Messages
11,861
Dublin yesterday. Masked goons protected by Gardai.



From what I understand of the law you are not compelled to comply with the requests of any unidentified person/s, person/s who may or may not be en route or in the attendance of any fancy dress party at any and all locations on this island.
 

valamhic

Banned
Joined
Jan 31, 2011
Messages
19,843
From what I understand, I held off predicting a slump in Ireland, but when I saw the pure false accounting in the wind energy racket, I came round to the view it is heading that was. There is no value in the assets reported on as valuable.

Wind farms are loosing 221 million per year for 2015 and 2016 and more last year.
 

Eventualities

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 16, 2018
Messages
2,196
Once again the masters of doom and gloom are at it .These Economists have been predicting the great fall for the last ten years ,every week you listen to them on radio and TV predicting disasters in the economy .Its the old story that if you keep saying something often enough you will be right eventually.

Its time someone took on these doom merchants and expose them every time their predictions are wrong .

Ireland is still one of the fastest growing economys in Europe 100% employment and one of the highest rates of home ownership inthe world most familys have two or three cars ,everybody has access to third level Education etc etc and these dam economists are trying to still upset us.
This post aged very well, in fairness.
 

Eventualities

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 16, 2018
Messages
2,196
From what I understand, I held off predicting a slump in Ireland, but when I saw the pure false accounting in the wind energy racket, I came round to the view it is heading that was. There is no value in the assets reported on as valuable.

Wind farms are loosing 221 million per year for 2015 and 2016 and more last year.
Reheating old beef because you don't like wind turbines.

Elite.
 

Clanrickard

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 25, 2008
Messages
32,946

Eventualities

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 16, 2018
Messages
2,196
Yes. Down with investment and creating employment. Viva la revolucion! *pst* Don't mention Venezuela.
We're quite lucky Ireland doesn't have oil. Otherwise we too would be on the receiving end of some hot and fresh 'democracy' from the Yanks
 

Watcher2

Well-known member
Joined
May 2, 2010
Messages
33,845
We're quite lucky Ireland doesn't have oil. Otherwise we too would be on the receiving end of some hot and fresh 'democracy' from the Yanks
Nah, our political class would have sold out to the yanks on oil much more easily. A few chats and greased palms and the job would have been oxo.
 

PBP voter

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 18, 2015
Messages
8,986
We're quite lucky Ireland doesn't have oil. Otherwise we too would be on the receiving end of some hot and fresh 'democracy' from the Yanks
Like in Norway?
 

stanley

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 20, 2007
Messages
9,181
Nah, our political class would have sold out to the yanks on oil much more easily. A few chats and greased palms and the job would have been oxo.


From memory FF lads sold out such rights years ago.
 

sic transit

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 30, 2008
Messages
25,566
Prime Time on politicians inserting themselves into planning issues tonight 9:35.
 

Voluntary

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 8, 2015
Messages
2,870
Prime Time on politicians inserting themselves into planning issues tonight 9:35.
Maybe we need a separation of roles, like we do have a separation of powers? Meaning, no TD should influence planning nor planners should influence politicians?
 

DJP

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 2, 2006
Messages
12,195
Website
darrenjprior.blogspot.ie
Am I right in saying that we experienced an economic depression (as opposed to a recession) in the latter of 2008 and 2009 and 2010? Can anyone tell me exactly the years since 2008 we experienced an economic depression and later a recession? I'm asking because I don't believe the words "economic depression" were barely used in 2009 and 2010 in Ireland and I would just like to know for clarity the years of of the last depression and later recession in Ireland.
 

ergo2

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 4, 2008
Messages
14,242
says former Central Bank governor - Independent.ie


What Patrick forgets to say or leaves out is the role of bonuses to bankers.

These were given out freely by way of shares in the banks themselves, this did not cost the banks any money they just issued new paper/shares at will and were allowed to do it almost unregulated.

Banks were also lending monies to their employees to buy shares at a discount to buy their own shares, to any banker this was a penalty kick in front of the posts and you could have as many kicks as you wanted.

Banks pension funds then bought other financial shares like a little circle, all benefit, their own little club and all the time gathering fees, charges, they had the goose laying golden eggs - daily.
Still happening?
 

SPN

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 2, 2004
Messages
16,797
Am I right in saying that we experienced an economic depression (as opposed to a recession) in the latter of 2008 and 2009 and 2010? Can anyone tell me exactly the years since 2008 we experienced an economic depression and later a recession? I'm asking because I don't believe the words "economic depression" were barely used in 2009 and 2010 in Ireland and I would just like to know for clarity the years of of the last depression and later recession in Ireland.
Whenever the banks stopped lending all the imaginary "economic grote" we thought we saw during the bank lending ponzi scheme was reversed.

A recession is two quarters of "negative economic grote"

A depression is a prolonged period of recession.




I would note that Ireland's grote since 2008 has been paid for with €120 Billion (plus) of deficit spending.
 

SPN

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 2, 2004
Messages
16,797
says former Central Bank governor - Independent.ie


What Patrick forgets to say or leaves out is the role of bonuses to bankers.

These were given out freely by way of shares in the banks themselves, this did not cost the banks any money they just issued new paper/shares at will and were allowed to do it almost unregulated.

Banks were also lending monies to their employees to buy shares at a discount to buy their own shares, to any banker this was a penalty kick in front of the posts and you could have as many kicks as you wanted.

Banks pension funds then bought other financial shares like a little circle, all benefit, their own little club and all the time gathering fees, charges, they had the goose laying golden eggs - daily.
But all of that there would have been a minor problem whenever the Government stepped in and maintained proper regulation of the property sector.

But that didn't happen.

The Government allowed a situation to develop where we had 300,000 out of 2,100,000 workers dependent on that there ponzi scheme for their income.

The Government itself became dependent on that there ponzi scheme for one third of its tax income - which it duly píssed away on gratuitous increases in current spending to buy the votes of the public sector and "social partners".

Then the banks stopped lending.
 
Top