Ireland's Emigration Crisis

FutureTaoiseach

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Thank you for spelling it out to me and allowing me a chance to reply.

The difference between my "dilution for the common good" and what happened with the .5 mill that came over here is time and settlement.
most of the .5 mill that came here were following the money.

Earning what they could and fking off back home - and to them i say a hearty "WELL DONE" - and "FAIR PLAY TO YOU" and also "ITS A PITY YOU COULDNT STAY LONGER".

With my model , the gombeenDiluters will stay , perhaps marry into the local gombeen class , have kids and maybe teach the kids not to be like the "old irish" - the gombeen wink wink nudge nudge , its who ya know BS which has this country in ruin.
Over time the kids might stand a chance , maybe have high expectations - i can dream cant i?

I know 5 people who are either married to or have kids with foreign nationals ( whatever that means ) - and a more nice bunch of people you couldnt meet.
They are constantly astounded at the gombeen behaviour here.
Im just hoping they dont "go native"
You are very naive not to take into account the costs of housing/treating/educating these people and their children, without it being self-financing because an increase in labour-supply inevitably causes downward pressure on pay and conditions - thus eroding the govt's tax-base as the more expensive Irish workers are displaced. No. Been there - done that. Our problems are not inherent to Irishness itself, but to attempting to fit a square peg into a round-hole.
 


G

Gadjodilo

Why thank you. Anything to add other than insults?
Which part of my post are you having trouble with - do u understand it , or do you disagree with it.
Please make your point so I can retort.
I could add yet more insults and they'd be personal, not racial; i.e. aimed at you only rather than the entire Irish nation.

Get with the times, racism is not cool - even when it's aimed at Irish people, you arrogant moron. Exactly what characteristics do you possess that makes you feel you're superior to 90% of this population - the Paddies? None, I suspect. You come across as one of those Godawful text-speak airheads with your choice of language and your trite opinions back this up.

So you believe Euro blood is non-stupid, Irish blood is and intelligence is genetically based, eh? Do you actually have evidence to back this up or did these ideas get sucked into your brain in the absence of anything else to fill the vacuum?

I see that others have taken issue with your drivel. Perhaps this is a surprise? Did you expect an influx of fellow self-loathers who would engage in their usual bout of quasi-masturbatory mutual congratulation? All so convinced that they're so bloody superior to the rest of us?

Cop on and grow up. And learn to punctuate.

gombeennation said:
good , hopefully it will breed the stupidity out of us.
it might take 30 - 40 years but it will be worth it.
a bit of euro blood over here would do us the world of good.
we might get a shot at a boom in say 30 years - i for one would be hoping that the next time we wont be 90% gombeens like this time around.

i would like the country to retain some of its wealth - this is impossible with paddy being the major demographic.
 

rhonda15

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It would be interesting if they did a follow up survey to see where people are emigrating to.

God what an IMMATURE and stupid little country we are in many ways.
 

riven

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Re the utterances that the Irish should stay.

Why should we? NAMA and increased tax rates will mean a high cost of living for years. Indeed when I total everything up I would be paying more tax in Ireland than here in the The Netherlands. And for what; a half ass transport system, a shoddy health care system and very poor rental services.

I left Ireland have completed my Engineering postgraduate studies with a potentially useful patent and several publications in the alternative energy area. The college where I studied neither had the inclination nor the capacity to develop these ideas further to which point the patent essentially sits in a drawer in some college in Ireland. This is not an isolated story. The college could have requested European funding if for nothing else more postgraduate work and maybe after a time, for a research center with industrial applications as a goal. This kind of activity is isolated and not helped but one such attempt is being made by some in NUIG (membranes).

Ireland has had the opportunities to develop its alternative energy sector for a long time. The sugar factories closure could have been used to invite European/Irish countries to adapt those plants and start making biofuels in preparation for cellulosic strategies. Bio diesel has been made in Ireland close to 10 years now but the support for these initiatives have left Ireland with (I think) one biodiesel plant. With the rest of Europe at this point mostly following an electrified grid (wind, solar, Nuclear e.g Germany, Spain, France) this would have allowed Ireland to corner a market. Even now Abengoa are building a massive biofuel plant in the Botlek near Rotterdam as well as an ethanol terminal to import ethanol from Brazil.

Suggestions that Irish people should stick around are ridiculous. The gombeen nature and parish pump politics that let people like Calley strut around are ghastly and I do not foresee an option to come back.
 

Think.Thank

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HOW TO FIX THE COUNTRY: Policy No.23

Emigration is actually a very important part to the recovery of Ireland's economic crisis but the problem we are faced with at the moment is that some of the people who are forced to emigrate to find work are or at least were very well setteled. i.e. People with families or mortgages or investment loans...
One of the other problems we are faced with is the rising numbered of unemployed people that are coming straight out of college
to sign onto the live register. If you calculate not only the cost to actually give the rising number of people 196euro per week without even considering, medical cards, rent allowence, back to education grants etc.... you can see that the support from the state (i.e. taxpayers and government borrowing from european commissions) is a massive amount and it is everyday accumulating.

So, what is the solution? ?

Pay for people who qualify with certain criteria to emigrate on a contract with the state for a number of years with a viewpoint that they will return to the economy when it has recovered or if they decide to not return then they will have to pay back the money with a fixedinterest they were funded to emigrate with.

This will solve a number of problems including but not exclusive too:
1. The number of unemployed will decrease, therefore increasing the chance to find employment for those who need it more than others.
2. The number of unemployed will decrease, therefore the cost to the state to support these people will decrease putting less strain on the borrowing the state is seamlessly continuing to do at a rising rate by the minute.
3. It will give people who want to emigrate but cannot as they are on social welfare payment a chance to emigrate and start a better future for themselves which will someday benifit the Irish economy.
4. It will give newly qualified people who have no or little work experience a chance to gain some vital work experience to which they can some day bring back to the Irish economy.

These are just a few points to a positive look on emigration...

If we want change in Éire it is up to the people to bring this change - Vote for ideas, don't vote for politicans to come up with ideas for you.
 

factual

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According to this report from July, Ireland has the highest emigration in Europe.

Ireland has highest emigration in EU - InsideIreland.ie



Why are we so accepting of emigration, especially as compared other countries? Sorting out the problem is tough enough with the political will, but there does not seem to be any will there at all. It just seems to be accepted that leaving is what Irish people do. Surely we've learned from the past that emigration is the ultimate evil that must be avoided at all costs? A sort of mark against which our success as a country should be assessed and measured, as opposed to nonsense like GDP?

More noise needs to be made about this. Here's a link to a long-running thread on the topic over on the property pin. The Emigration Thread. • thepropertypin.com
Its taking a long time for the penny to drop.

I will go slowly.

In a MONETARY UNION there is just about no scope for countercyclical fical or monetary policy in some part of the union, so labour market shocks can only be dealt with by migration of labour.
 

papaquebec

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Catalpa

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good , hopefully it will breed the stupidity out of us.
it might take 30 - 40 years but it will be worth it.
a bit of euro blood over here would do us the world of good.
we might get a shot at a boom in say 30 years - i for one would be hoping that the next time we wont be 90% gombeens like this time around.

i would like the country to retain some of its wealth - this is impossible with paddy being the major demographic.
Sorry mate but comments like that are plain Anti Irish Racism!
 

papaquebec

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littleowl

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I was watching Reeling in the Years from 1986 yesterday as many were filmed boarding flights of emmigration.

Unemployment in 1986 was 250,000, it is now 450,000.

The population has increased but it sure as hell has not doubled, I think this is a fair yardstick for the sh1t we are now in.
 

Mister men

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I was watching Reeling in the Years from 1986 yesterday as many were filmed boarding flights of emmigration.

Unemployment in 1986 was 250,000, it is now 450,000.

The population has increased but it sure as hell has not doubled, I think this is a fair yardstick for the sh1t we are now in.
It's where we are going i'm worried about.
 

FutureTaoiseach

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Yes but the social-welfare rates of 2010 were simply unimaginable in 1986 and unemployment was then 18% so it's still not comparing like with like. You also have to remember that many can't afford to emigrate because of mortgages, and that post-911 America is harder to migrate to.
 

papaquebec

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Oh, my God, I agree with Catalpa.

Your comment is putting it very mildly, by the way.
Maybe I should explain.

I hate the "r" word. It's one the most overused expressions used on certain threads on certain fora.

It's used to stifle honest debate and brand the accused as some kind of "lesser person", someone who's opinions are to be treated with a pinch of the proverbial. Someone with "issues". A bigot, a xenophobe etc.

Rather than be partisan, I'd rather it wasnt used at all!!
 

gombeennation

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You are very naive not to take into account the costs of housing/treating/educating these people and their children, without it being self-financing because an increase in labour-supply inevitably causes downward pressure on pay and conditions - thus eroding the govt's tax-base as the more expensive Irish workers are displaced. No. Been there - done that. Our problems are not inherent to Irishness itself, but to attempting to fit a square peg into a round-hole.
not one , not ONE of those foreign nationals i speak of are claiming the dole. they are PAYE workers and as such will have paid tax.

to all those people here who think i have it wrong - how many times do we have to go bankrupt before you admit that paddy has a problem with the pennys and pounds?

how many times will someone in power have to get away with saying "i won it on the horse" - how many times will a minister sign a false affidavit in the high court before we admit we have low expectations.

i used to be like you fools - pulling on the green jersey.
no more paddy - your on your own.

btw i never said i was better than anyone - im just here to tell you how it is.
paddy is a low expectation , money useless ( yet money grabbing ) , cap tipping slave mentality fiend who would do ANYTHING if it meant him getting a pat on the head from someone "important".

Have a lot at FF canvasers - what are they in it for - a pat on the head.
dont get me wrong , developers , builders bankers etc i can understand them fellas promoting FF - but you get your sleevens as well.
doin all that shlt in the hope the big man might buy him a pint in front of the bar sometime.
"jazus that mick fellas , he's well in there"
absolutely pathetic mind set.
have a look at the bould ivor for instance.
claiming for mileage to a gaff in cork - see what happens in britain when you pull that shlt.
out on your fking ear.
over here? ah sure im sure theres been some mistake.
no fallout , thats the problem.
and why? it all comes back to low expectations.
 

kerdasi amaq

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Sorry mate but comments like that are plain Anti Irish Racism!
That's the only kind of "racism" that's tolerated in liberal progressive Ireland!
 


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