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Irish citizen captured fighting with ISIS

Lagertha

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Lol that's my point. Why are you unable to to say that Shamima is English?
It's the only logical conclusion for someone who says that a child born outside of Ireland is not Irish, but is the nationality of their country of birth.
So, a child of Bangladeshi parents born outside of Bangladesh is not Bangladeshi, right? So Shamima Begum must be English. According to your logic, and no matter what the law (which you say is an ass) says.

You're good value for the money anyway, I'll give you that!

I don't care in the least what passports my adult children hold. Currently the eldest has three but he's a bit of a magpie anyway, was always collecting stuff when he was a kid.
That's good, a parent should be proud of their children and their achievements, not hung up in a debate on their nationality with a random stranger on the internet. You have your opinions and I have mine, it's all just a matter of opinion. :)
 


Buchaill Dana

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That's good, a parent should be proud of their children and their achievements, not hung up in a debate on their nationality with a random stranger on the internet. You have your opinions and I have mine, it's all just a matter of opinion. :)
But you are presenting your opinion as facr, and contradicting yourself as you do it.
 

petaljam

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That's good, a parent should be proud of their children and their achievements, not hung up in a debate on their nationality with a random stranger on the internet. You have your opinions and I have mine, it's all just a matter of opinion. :)
Passports are not an achievement, in fact they're often something of an accident of birth.

Well, IMO anyway, whereas you seem to be saying that the place your mother was when you were born defines you more than where you grew up. I have friends whose youngest child was born in Japan, but unlikke his older brothers he has no memory of the place, having left when under a year old. But you think he's Japanese and his eldest brother, who went to school there is actually American. :whistle:

Thing is though, you haven't managed to make a coherent case for your claims so I take it you are aware of your inconsistencies and are hoping to bluff your way through.
 

Lagertha

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Passports are not an achievement, in fact they're often something of an accident of birth.

Well, IMO anyway, whereas you seem to be saying that the place your mother was when you were born defines you more than where you grew up. I have friends whose youngest child was born in Japan, but unlikke his older brothers he has no memory of the place, having left when under a year old. But you think he's Japanese and his eldest brother, who went to school there is actually American. :whistle:

Thing is though, you haven't managed to make a coherent case for your claims so I take it you are aware of your inconsistencies and are hoping to bluff your way through.
I meant that you made it seem though one of your children likes to travel and broaden their horizons which is a good thing. I never said that the place your mother was born defines you more than where you grew up. If anything your insistence that your place of birth defines your children is more reflective of that. As for the Japanese child, I very much doubt that the average Japanese person whose parents are Japanese, would consider that child to be Japanese. Your children could be called Fuinneog and Sneachta, be carrot haired, freckle skinned and born holding a hurley in their hands, but they weren't born in Ireland and to me that makes them foreign nationals, with dual citizenship. I'm not attacking your kids, I'm simply expressing a view that many Irish people would share.

My mother in laws father was from the West Indies, she was born in Britain and she would never consider herself to be anything other than English, her siblings feel the same way. My husband wouldn't really give his grandfather's nationality much thought and he has no interest in West Indian culture, the only thing he inherited from his grandfather's side of the family is hair that's prone to turn a little bit Afro if it gets any length at all in it and a great tan in the Summer.

You will see children born here of non EU national parents who will always consider themselves to be the nationality of their parents country of origin and will always identify with their parents culture than with Irish culture. Most Eastern Europeans make sure that their children who were born here are well versed in their parents cultural heritage, are bilingual and visit their parents country of origin frequently. They too will be encouraged to identify with their parents culture than with Irish culture.
 

petaljam

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I meant that you made it seem though one of your children likes to travel and broaden their horizons which is a good thing.
Ah okay. It's true actually, he does and he is curious about other cultures. He's currently in Central Asia in one of the former Soviet Republics, his second long term stay in Central Asia.
I never said that the place your mother was born defines you more than where you grew up.
So what did you mean then, when you went off on your rant about delusions? You said various posters' children weren't Irish because they weren't born in Ireland, but you didn't ask where they grew up. Now you're trying to walk that back.

If anything your insistence that your place of birth defines your children is more reflective of that.
Eh no, that was your argument, not mine.

As for the Japanese child, I very much doubt that the average Japanese person whose parents are Japanese, would consider that child to be Japanese.
No indeeed they don't, and IMO (and his) he isn't, he's Irish. But you said that he couldn't be Irish.

Your children could be called Fuinneog and Sneachta, be carrot haired, freckle skinned and born holding a hurley in their hands, but they weren't born in Ireland and to me that makes them foreign nationals, with dual citizenship. I'm not attacking your kids, I'm simply expressing a view that many Irish people would share.
You probably want to make up your mind here, you're all over the place!
And I haven't taken it as an attack on my children, that would be silly. There was a lot of nasty personal stuff about me and/or other posters, but happily I don't give give two hoots what you say about me. I suspect it says something about you though.

My mother in laws father was from the West Indies, she was born in Britain and she would never consider herself to be anything other than English, her siblings feel the same way. My husband wouldn't really give his grandfather's nationality much thought and he has no interest in West Indian culture, the only thing he inherited from his grandfather's side of the family is hair that's prone to turn a little bit Afro if it gets any length at all in it and a great tan in the Summer.

You will see children born here of non EU national parents who will always consider themselves to be the nationality of their parents country of origin and will always identify with their parents culture than with Irish culture. Most Eastern Europeans make sure that their children who were born here are well versed in their parents cultural heritage, are bilingual and visit their parents country of origin frequently. They too will be encouraged to identify with their parents culture than with Irish culture.
This all completely contradicts your earlier claim.
 
Last edited:

Politics matters

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I meant that you made it seem though one of your children likes to travel and broaden their horizons which is a good thing. I never said that the place your mother was born defines you more than where you grew up. If anything your insistence that your place of birth defines your children is more reflective of that. As for the Japanese child, I very much doubt that the average Japanese person whose parents are Japanese, would consider that child to be Japanese. Your children could be called Fuinneog and Sneachta, be carrot haired, freckle skinned and born holding a hurley in their hands, but they weren't born in Ireland and to me that makes them foreign nationals, with dual citizenship. I'm not attacking your kids, I'm simply expressing a view that many Irish people would share.

My mother in laws father was from the West Indies, she was born in Britain and she would never consider herself to be anything other than English, her siblings feel the same way. My husband wouldn't really give his grandfather's nationality much thought and he has no interest in West Indian culture, the only thing he inherited from his grandfather's side of the family is hair that's prone to turn a little bit Afro if it gets any length at all in it and a great tan in the Summer.

You will see children born here of non EU national parents who will always consider themselves to be the nationality of their parents country of origin and will always identify with their parents culture than with Irish culture. Most Eastern Europeans make sure that their children who were born here are well versed in their parents cultural heritage, are bilingual and visit their parents country of origin frequently. They too will be encouraged to identify with their parents culture than with Irish culture.
So your husband is partly a black?
 

Lagertha

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So your husband is partly a black?
Nope, his grandfather was black his grandmother was white. It's funny really, his mum is of Mediterranean appearance but his aunt is much darker, although she lives in Australia so that probably has something to do with it. I do wind him up when he goes dark in the summer and tell him it's the N word in him.
 

Lagertha

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Ah okay. It's true actually, he does and he is curious about other cultures. He's currently in Central Asia in one of the former Soviet Republics, his second long term stay in Central Asia.

So what did you mean then, when you went off on your rant about delusions? You said various posters' children weren't Irish because they weren't born in Ireland, but you didn't ask where they grew up. Now you're trying to walk that back.



Eh no, that was your argument, not mine.



No indeeed they don't, and IMO (and his) he isn't, he's Irish. But you said that he couldn't be Irish.



You probably want to make up your mind here, you're all over the place!
And I haven't taken it as an attack on my children, that would be silly. There was a lot of nasty personal stuff about me and/or other posters, but happily I don't give give two hoots what you say about me. I suspect it says something about you though.


This all completely contradicts your earlier claim.
Nope, it really doesn't. This is just one of those issues we'll have to agree to disagree on.
 

petaljam

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Nope, it really doesn't. This is just one of those issues we'll have to agree to disagree on.
We can agree to disagree, but you've actually walked yourself around to taking the very position you called me "deluded" over, and now you're telling me I'm disagreeing with my own opinion? FFS, stop digging. Lol
 

Politics matters

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Nope, his grandfather was black his grandmother was white. It's funny really, his mum is of Mediterranean appearance but his aunt is much darker, although she lives in Australia so that probably has something to do with it. I do wind him up when he goes dark in the summer and tell him it's the N word in him.
Hard to tell in some people.

Did you know that the ex Man Utd player and current Welsh manager Ryan Giggs has some black in him?
 

Destiny's Soldier

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The Brits are active undercover in Estonia.


The two SAS units are part of the 1st Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance Brigade, and have been deployed in Estonia for the past six months.
It is understood that the troops are conducting Human Environment, Reconnaissance and Analysis (HERA) operations, where they monitor the movement of a potential enemy and analyse their intentions.

The part-time troops are trained by serving members of the SAS and must all pass an extensive selection process.

The SAS reservists units are made up of civilians from various professions including barristers, accountants, architects and doctors, although their role is combat and life preservation.
So if they are active in a non war zone, it is highly likely that Ms Smith was recruited to do precisely the above role with the protection that in the event of her capture by the SAA she could claim she was from neutral Ireland.

No Irish Person no matter how deranged would elope to a join a head-chopping cult - unless under military instruction to do so.
 

buttercookie

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The Brits are active undercover in Estonia.







So if they are active in a non war zone, it is highly likely that Ms Smith was recruited to do precisely the above role with the protection that in the event of her capture by the SAA she could claim she was from neutral Ireland.

No Irish Person no matter how deranged would elope to a join a head-chopping cult - unless under military instruction to do so.

You under estimate the brain washing that is part of the Muslim religion.

The poor sap had been depressed and may not have had many friends, most depressed people dont because they suck the life out of everyone around them. She meets some nice people who make time for her and then shes gradually sucked in and brain washed until she stops thinking for herself. Its the same way those women of low IQ get involved with men who want EU citizenship, they pay some loser a few compliments, take her out for a couple of meals and next thing she is pregnant and the father has the right to stay In ireland or is well on the way to getting this right. He doesnt care about the child or the mother, he just uses everyone he meets to get what he wants.
 

Pyewacket

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You under estimate the brain washing that is part of the Muslim religion.

The poor sap had been depressed and may not have had many friends, most depressed people dont because they suck the life out of everyone around them. She meets some nice people who make time for her and then shes gradually sucked in and brain washed until she stops thinking for herself. Its the same way those women of low IQ get involved with men who want EU citizenship, they pay some loser a few compliments, take her out for a couple of meals and next thing she is pregnant and the father has the right to stay In ireland or is well on the way to getting this right. He doesnt care about the child or the mother, he just uses everyone he meets to get what he wants.
You could be more or less describing yourself.

All those little dopamine shots from "likes" given by anonymous posters who are clearly thick as two short planks and wouldn't piss on you if you were on fire encourages you and makes you feel special. Someone with something to communicate, a message fo the ages. :)
 

Lagertha

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Lisa Smith, who is seldom mentioned by her Muslim name or her married name, usually only by her maiden name by Irish media, is being held in a camp for especially dangerous ISIS wives. Last week they rioted and attacked guards. Also it has been reported that the Danish government is working closely with the Irish government to get this dangerous woman back to Ireland, apparently the Dane's have a similar problem with one of their female nationals.


 

Herr Rommel

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Lisa Smith, who is seldom mentioned by her Muslim name or her married name, usually only by her maiden name by Irish media, is being held in a camp for especially dangerous ISIS wives. Last week they rioted and attacked guards. Also it has been reported that the Danish government is working closely with the Irish government to get this dangerous woman back to Ireland, apparently the Dane's have a similar problem with one of their female nationals.


No doubt she was a ringleader out there.
 

Destiny's Soldier

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37574400_n.jpg?_nc_cat=103&_nc_ht=scontent.fdub4-1.jpg

Image for link above.
 

Kevin Parlon

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No Irish Person no matter how deranged would elope to a join a head-chopping cult - unless under military instruction to do so.
This is just a failure of imagination on your part. You clearly aren't even nebulously aware of the power of religious indoctrination.
 

A Voice

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Lisa Smith, who is seldom mentioned by her Muslim name or her married name, usually only by her maiden name by Irish media, is being held in a camp for especially dangerous ISIS wives. Last week they rioted and attacked guards. Also it has been reported that the Danish government is working closely with the Irish government to get this dangerous woman back to Ireland, apparently the Dane's have a similar problem with one of their female nationals.


Indeed. That would be problematic for liberals, who for the purposes of this little battle, want her to be as Irish as possible. No othering of Umm Ruqayyah is therefore to be encouraged. Umm Ruqayyah means daughter of Mohammed.
 


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