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Irish citizens applying for UK passports

easygoing

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Oct 5, 2006
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I have noticed an increase in Northern people from a unionist background applying for Irish passports over the past few years.

I was just wondering if the reverse is also true? ROI citizens may apply for a British passport; what are the advantages for one's ability to travel of doing so?

I'm not looking for invective and political grandstanding here; rather, I', looking for any practical reasons, if any, as to why a ROI citizen should/might consider applying for a British passport.
 


johnfás

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Better diplomatic protection in some South American countries, cheaper visas to some countries - Australia, Rwanda (yes some of us have bizzarely been to Rwanda!). There is a flip side of course and there is many advantages to the Irish passport over the British one, particularly in conflict areas.
 

Centurian

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Citizens of the Republic of Ireland are not elegible to apply for British passports.
 

easygoing

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Centurian said:
Citizens of the Republic of Ireland are not elegible to apply for British passports.
Are you sure? I don't think that's correct. I could be wrong however, and am open to correction. Any links?
 

Halibut

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Think if you were born in NI before 1948(?) you can apply. My mother is entitled to one.
 

Stíofán

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Centurian said:
Citizens of the Republic of Ireland are not elegible to apply for British passports.
unless you were born in a hospital in NI, which many along the border would be. And an increasing proportion will be, given the downgrading of acute medical services in provincial hospitals in Dundalk, Monaghan and elsewhere.
 

locke

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Longer visas in a lot of Commonwealth countries. For example a British citizen can stay in Hong Kong on a standard 'turn up at the airport' visa for six months. It used to make permanent immigration to Canada and New Zealand easier, but those regulations may have changed in the last decade.
 

farnaby

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easygoing said:
I was just wondering if the reverse is also true? ROI citizens may apply for a British passport; what are the advantages for one's ability to travel of doing so?

I'm not looking for invective and political grandstanding here; rather, I', looking for any practical reasons, if any, as to why a ROI citizen should/might consider applying for a British passport.
My brother and sister have been tempted to go for a british passport as unlike myself they've lived practically all their lives in the UK and their future is definitely based there. There's plenty of 2nd generation irish people in the UK, who may think the same. But they've yet to apply for one as they see practically no additional benefit and in some cases the slight advantage of an irish passport being more welcome (or less unwelcome) than a british one.
 

Centurian

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NeilW said:
This Irish citizen is.
That's as may be, but in general citizens of the Irish Republic are not entitled to apply for British passports
 

locke

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I think the rule is if you have a parent born before 1948 or a grandparent born before 1921, you are entitled to one. That covers a lot of the population.
 

NeilW

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Centurian said:
NeilW said:
This Irish citizen is.
That's as may be, but in general citizens of the Irish Republic are not entitled to apply for British passports
Except those who were born in the North or those who were born before 1949 or those who have acquired rights to naturalisation as a British citizen.
 

Centurian

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locke said:
Longer visas in a lot of Commonwealth countries. For example a British citizen can stay in Hong Kong on a standard 'turn up at the airport' visa for six months.
A British Citizen can stay for 180 days. An Irish Citizen can stay for 90 days. - There are plans that the admittance period for all EU citizens will be harmonised soon.
 
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Lots of young people in NI have tended to apply for both especially if they planning a WHV to Australia as apply under one and when it expires come home and reapply under the other.
 

Centurian

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locke said:
I think the rule is if you have a parent born before 1948 or a grandparent born before 1921, you are entitled to one. That covers a lot of the population.
You think wrong ! ;) The person themselves needs to have been born before 1949 - Parents or Grandparents are completely irrelevant.
 

GDPR

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I suppose having a british passport might make it easier to get certain defence related or civil service jobs over there etc ? Or make it easy to get student loans or certain types of supports if living there ? But the reverse could also be true about the Irish passport here.

When travelling abroad, I cant think why it shouldnt be but is it legal to carry two different passports from two countries at once ?
 

KingKane

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Centurian said:
locke said:
I think the rule is if you have a parent born before 1948 or a grandparent born before 1921, you are entitled to one. That covers a lot of the population.
You think wrong ! ;) The person themselves needs to have been born before 1949 - Parents or Grandparents are completely irrelevant.
I think if the parent was born before 1949 and they had one then you might be able to apply. I can apply, but cos I was born over there. Never really been tempted to though.
 

setanta

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The attached wiki page gives a reasonably accurate summary of the complexities of British citizenship: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_nationality_law. Thje following wiki article discusses how British citizenship applies (or has aplied in teh past) to citizens of the Irish Republic: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_nationality_law_and_the_Republic_of_Ireland

By and large, Irish citizens, have no more rights to claim or apply for British citizenship than the citizens of most other EU member states, with the exception of those born in the Free State/Republic before 1949 for whom special arrangments apply (but which does not include automatic British citizenship).

Irish people born in Northern Ireland, of course, retain the option of applying for either Irish or British or both citizenships. I believe, but am up for correction, that the right to British citizenship in the North is also dependent on at least one parent being born within the UK. As such, children born to parents ordinarilly resident in, or born themselves, in the Republic, would have no automatic entitlement to British citizenship. So being born in the maternity wing of a NI hospital will not, in and of itself, entitle a person to claim British citizenship.
 

Alliance

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easygoing said:
Centurian said:
Citizens of the Republic of Ireland are not elegible to apply for British passports.
Are you sure? I don't think that's correct. I could be wrong however, and am open to correction. Any links?
It's true. Even though the DUP and the UUP both have that matter in their manifestos and various Conservative MPs on the mainland are supportive of the idea. Dermot Ahern is STILL under the impression that Irish citizens can apply for British passports.
 

setanta

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Alliance said:
easygoing said:
Centurian said:
Citizens of the Republic of Ireland are not elegible to apply for British passports.
Are you sure? I don't think that's correct. I could be wrong however, and am open to correction. Any links?
It's true. Even though the DUP and the UUP both have that matter in their manifestos and various Conservative MPs on the mainland are supportive of the idea. Dermot Ahern is STILL under the impression that Irish citizens can apply for British passports.
Irish citizens can apply for British citizenship, but it's pretty much on the same basis as the citizens of any other EU-15 member state and that specifically means that they must be habitually resident in the UK. The special provisions relating to some Irish people are very limited indeed and are largely historic. No-one other than the knuckle-draggers in the DUP, UUP or British Tory party are at all animated about this.
 


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