Irish Famine Commemoration

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Irish Famine Commemoration
27th August 2006 @ 1pm
Famine Garden, High Rd., Letterkenny, Co. Donegal.


Many years have passed since the awful tragedy of An Gorta Mór. A famine, which accounts for one of the most horrific periods, in our long history; suffering under the Saxon tyrants. A third of our population [possibly much greater] died slow agonising deaths or were part of the forced exiling of the natives from Erin. Many living out their lives in hardship and misery. The enforced starvation of the Gaelic people had detrimental long-term effects. A nationwide decline in health; over 50% mortality rate of children under five amongst the Irish at home and those in exile in the US, Canada and England. The Gaelic language, culture and heritage was almost obliterated. An unrecoverable loss of half the folklore, music and history of our ancient race.
The psychological effects were even more traumatic. Young girls had witnessed their newly born children die of starvation upon their breasts. Whole families were forced to cuddle themselves together through the dark winters in cruel and damp conditions; raw to the bone with starvation. Where the screams and convulsions symbolised the collapse of their vital organs as they slipped away to death. Tens of thousands lay unburied upon the roads, ditches and in their mud cabins for weeks on end. The people were reduced to begging or were enslaved in work-houses. Evictions saw families lose their entire possessions, reduced to live in ‘Scalps’ [holes dug about 2 feet in the ground and covered over with sticks, turf and brambles]. Disease, Fever, Plague, Malnutrition, along with the harsh military suppression, devastated the spirit of the Gaels, making life almost unbearable; the suffering second nature.
Yet the Gael refused to surrender and give up hope upon life. Fathers and mothers scoured the countryside in search of crumbs for their children. They ate leaves, grass, weeds, along with the smallest scraps of food [often decayed], they could scavenge. Millions vowed never to degrade their ancestral fathers - refused to give up their freedom to be enslaved in the workhouses in return for Saxon soup. Young men who had both courage and strength boldly seized crops and livestock from the planted landlords. Many being imprisoned, exiled and the bravest cruelly murdered. Every town felt the rape that was happening to the nation. Yet it was the rural Gaeltacht regions that saw the greatest and most tragic deaths occur. Whole villages became wasteland, as the stench of rotting crops and decomposed humans released a foul and contagious plague into the air, which was carried through the ghostly winds.
The land was decayed, the people reduced to live in wretched poverty. While simultaneously the Saxon rapists, gloated in their mansions, feasting on amassed wealth gained through criminal and evil actions. The putrid whore Victoria, grew more obese each day, fattening on the extortion and stealth taxes imposed upon the ancient and sacred Gael. [While many years later the Redcoat John Bruton wined and dinned with English monarchy, praising their criminal empire, while trying to denounce and shame those who died under the barbaric and sadistic crimes of English monarchy in Ireland].
In the spirit of nationhood, we have organised this commemoration, so the memory of our fathers and their families are not lost to the colonial projects of England and Europe. We shall commemorate the sad deaths that occurred in this dark period of suffering - inflicted ruthlessly upon the Gael. We shall honour the brave and resilient Irish who became victims to the genocide of English monarchy and their perverse planted landlords. We hope you will also cherish the memory of your ancestors and will support and attend our commemoration as a fitting tribute to their lives and their tragic deaths. Éirinn go Brách.

Organised by Craobh Gal Gréine
Irish Cultural Society
 


oreiley1

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HMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM

A tad biased dont you think?. There were many good landlords who went bankrupt trying to help tenants. It was a time of noblesse oblige and governments did not intervene.

You fail also to mention the hugh irresponsible Irish Birth rate and the inheritance system which made small farm holdings the norm.

The famine was a sad period and more should have been done. Where for example was the great Catholic Church when its mass goers were dying in their millions?. As with the Jewish Nazi genocide in WW2 the great Catholic church was silent.
 

Cael

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Nice to see the plain truth being told for a change! The famine of 1847/48 in Ireland was no more a natural disaster than the famines in Africa of today. They are totally man made instruments of war and conquest. Indeed, right from the days when the English poet Spencer calculated the link between the promotion of famine and the success of the English conquest of Ireland, famine has been a very conscious resource in England's colonial projects from America to India to Africa. Indeed, the weapon was used against India as late as 1943 when over three million died.
 

hiding behind a poster

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Cael said:
Nice to see the plain truth being told for a change! The famine of 1847/48 in Ireland
Errr, the plain truth is that the famine started in 1845, not 1847.


was no more a natural disaster than the famines in Africa of today.
You'll be saying the Brits sprayed blight on the spuds next.
 

Cael

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A typically shallow contribution. If we are totally accurate the famine started with the policies which made this famine and the many before it inevitable.
 

hiding behind a poster

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What policies were they? And what policies would you have had instead?
 

emmet100

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I don't see why people continue to call it a famine. By definition, a famine is when a coutry does not have sufficient food supplies to feed it's population, whereas during 1845-1850 Ireland was producing enough meat, fish and other foodstuffs to feed over TWICE it's population. But this food was exported AT A PROFIT (and under armed gaurd to prevent the starving people seizing the supplies) mainly to the British market.
I mean, there's laissez-faire and there's outright stupidity with a 'f*ck them' attitude.
 

Cael

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If it was just stupidity it wouldnt be so bad - but the British were well aware of how well the extermination of the Irish speaking, unanglicized population of Ireland suited their purpose.
 

emmet100

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Cael said:
If it was just stupidity it wouldnt be so bad - but the British were well aware of how well the extermination of the Irish speaking, unanglicized population of Ireland suited their purpose.
Exactly, the sad thing is people just believe what they're told in the classroom, as if pigs and cows didn't exist in Ireland at the time.
 
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we should only refer to it as the great hunger or the irish holocaust. as emmet has said there was no shortage of food. it was carfully planned by the english parliament.
 

Cael

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Not only the poor of Ireland were dependent on the potato. The Times editorial of September 30, 1845, warned; "In England the two main meals of a working man's day now consists of potatoes." England's potato-dependence was as excessive as Ireland's. Grossly over-populated relative to its food supply, England faced famine unless it could import vast amounts of alternative food. But it didn't take merely Ireland's surplus food; or enough Irish food to save England. It took more; for profit and to exterminate the people of Ireland. Queen Victoria's economist, Nassau Senior, expressed his fear that existing policies "will not kill more than one million Irish in 1848 and that will scarcely be enough to do much good." When an eye-witness urged a stop to the genocide-in-progress, Trevelyan replied: "We must not complain of what we really want to obtain." Trevelyan insisted that all reports of starvation were exaggerated, until 1847. He then declared it ended and refused entry to the American food relief ship Sorciére. Thomas Carlyle; influential British essayist, wrote; "Ireland is like a half-starved rat that crosses the path of an elephant. What must the elephant do? Squelch it - by heavens - squelch it." "Total Annihilation;" suggested The Times leader of September 2, 1846; and in 1848 its editorialists crowed "A Celt will soon be as rare on the banks of the Shannon as the red man on the banks of Manhattan."

For full text please consult this link: http://home.comcast.net/~irishholocaust ... intent.htm
 

AFJROTC Cadet

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My great great Grandmother fled Ireland when she was like 16 because of the fammine.


Is it true there was cannibals during the Famine?
 

Maeve

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emmet100 said:
Exactly, the sad thing is people just believe what they're told in the classroom, as if pigs and cows didn't exist in Ireland at the time.
And for many, the pig was the rent--if you ate that, you had no money to pay the landlord and were out of a home. Exposure was a major contributor to the death rate, especially in the winter of '47-48
 

White Horse

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A typical political stunt by the anti-British, exploiting the deaths of many people for their own deviant purposes.

Shameful.
 

Cael

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White Horse said:
A typical political stunt by the anti-British, exploiting the deaths of many people for their own deviant purposes.

Shameful.
Whats really shameful is holocaust denyers pretending that genocide was some kind of accident that nobody was responsible for. In Germany that is a criminal offence - in Ireland its classed as good manners.
 
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Well Said Cael.

White Horse, you are blinded by that anti republican chip you have on ypur shoulders.

you only ever attack republicanism on this.

quite sad
 

Gary

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White Horse said:
A typical political stunt by the anti-British, exploiting the deaths of many people for their own deviant purposes.

Shameful.
you're not John Bruton by any chance?

Not only the poor of Ireland were dependent on the potato. The Times editorial of September 30, 1845, warned; "In England the two main meals of a working man's day now consists of potatoes." England's potato-dependence was as excessive as Ireland's. Grossly over-populated relative to its food supply, England faced famine unless it could import vast amounts of alternative food. But it didn't take merely Ireland's surplus food; or enough Irish food to save England. It took more; for profit and to exterminate the people of Ireland. Queen Victoria's economist, Nassau Senior, expressed his fear that existing policies "will not kill more than one million Irish in 1848 and that will scarcely be enough to do much good." When an eye-witness urged a stop to the genocide-in-progress, Trevelyan replied: "We must not complain of what we really want to obtain." Trevelyan insisted that all reports of starvation were exaggerated, until 1847. He then declared it ended and refused entry to the American food relief ship Sorciére. Thomas Carlyle; influential British essayist, wrote; "Ireland is like a half-starved rat that crosses the path of an elephant. What must the elephant do? Squelch it - by heavens - squelch it." "Total Annihilation;" suggested The Times leader of September 2, 1846; and in 1848 its editorialists crowed "A Celt will soon be as rare on the banks of the Shannon as the red man on the banks of Manhattan."

For full text please consult this link: http://home.comcast.net/~irishholocaust ... intent.htm

Ráite go maith a Chaeil
 

Catalpa

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Folks:

Much as I agree with the moral culpability of the British Political Establishment in fostering the conditions that lead to this terrible situation, the fact is most of the victims did not die of starvation per se but through fever and disease. The cumulative effects of malnutrition on weakened systems meant that they were too weak in constitution to be able to resist disease and exposure when confronted with those conditions.

There was a lot of food exported during those years but that alone was not enough to feed everybody. Also it would have ruined the Economy even more than it was. Sure it was galling that this happened but the situation could only have been turned round through a massive importation of decent foodstuffs to feed the people so effected.

The response of the BPE was parsimonious and reluctant Relief schemes, an attitude fuelled by a deep seated Racist mentality towards the Irish who they considered an inferior Race whom it might be better to get rid of.
 

Cael

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Those who say that the English government did not murder over a million Irish people during the 1840's are using the same logic as saying that the Nazis did not murder six million Jews - it was their own lack of resistance to gas that killed them.
 

hiding behind a poster

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Cael said:
Whats really shameful is holocaust denyers pretending that genocide was some kind of accident that nobody was responsible for. In Germany that is a criminal offence - in Ireland its classed as good manners.
I don't think you'll find too many people denying that the famine happened. But because people are capable of rationally discussing the myriad of causes of that famine, as distinct from taking a simplistic, primary-school-history-class approach to it, doesn't mean anyone's saying it didn't happen.
 


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