Irish Farmers are useless

Schuhart

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Jul 24, 2006
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In Ireland, a farm labour force of 270,000 produces gross value added (i.e., value of what they produce less cost of inputs) of €2,345m. That’s about €8,700 each.

In UK (which doesn’t even regard itself as an agricultural country) a farm labour force of 431,000 produces gross value added of €9,602m. That’s €22,280 each, making them more than twice as productive.

Put simply, our agricultural sector is in the wrong hands and we should have a policy of prising the land out of the hands of the current unproductive cohort of farmers, so that it can be accessed by people who might actually put it to work.

Sources for the figures at the URLs below:
Eurostat - Tables, Graphs and Maps Interface (TGM) table
Eurostat - Tables, Graphs and Maps Interface (TGM) table
 


hiding behind a poster

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Mar 8, 2005
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What's the breakdown between full-time and part-time farmers in each country?
 

Fritzbox

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Feb 9, 2012
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In Ireland, a farm labour force of 270,000 produces gross value added (i.e., value of what they produce less cost of inputs) of €2,345m. That’s about €8,700 each.

In UK (which doesn’t even regard itself as an agricultural country) a farm labour force of 431,000 produces gross value added of €9,602m. That’s €22,280 each, making them more than twice as productive.

Put simply, our agricultural sector is in the wrong hands and we should have a policy of prising the land out of the hands of the current unproductive cohort of farmers, so that it can be accessed by people who might actually put it to work.

Sources for the figures at the URLs below:
Eurostat - Tables, Graphs and Maps Interface (TGM) table
Eurostat - Tables, Graphs and Maps Interface (TGM) table
This is a well known situation. Does the farmers' dole still exist in one form or another?

They're all subsidised by the EU, you know. The Irish tax payer doesn't have to pay a thing.
 

ger12

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Feb 25, 2011
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Two threads on farmers? :shock:
 

A Voice

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Sep 29, 2009
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In Ireland, a farm labour force of 270,000 produces gross value added (i.e., value of what they produce less cost of inputs) of €2,345m. That’s about €8,700 each.

In UK (which doesn’t even regard itself as an agricultural country) a farm labour force of 431,000 produces gross value added of €9,602m. That’s €22,280 each, making them more than twice as productive.

Put simply, our agricultural sector is in the wrong hands and we should have a policy of prising the land out of the hands of the current unproductive cohort of farmers, so that it can be accessed by people who might actually put it to work.

Sources for the figures at the URLs below:
Eurostat - Tables, Graphs and Maps Interface (TGM) table
Eurostat - Tables, Graphs and Maps Interface (TGM) table
Isn't that just a function of intensive farming and automation? Do we really want MORE rather than less of that?
 

Wascurito

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Apr 18, 2017
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I imagine output per hectare would be a more appropriate measure?

Schurely Schuhart doesn't expect a farmer with two hectares to produce as much as one that owns 200?

If he does, then I can't help him. :lol:
 

Jack O Neill

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Jul 8, 2015
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6,812
In Ireland, a farm labour force of 270,000 produces gross value added (i.e., value of what they produce less cost of inputs) of €2,345m. That’s about €8,700 each.

In UK (which doesn’t even regard itself as an agricultural country) a farm labour force of 431,000 produces gross value added of €9,602m. That’s €22,280 each, making them more than twice as productive.

Put simply, our agricultural sector is in the wrong hands and we should have a policy of prising the land out of the hands of the current unproductive cohort of farmers, so that it can be accessed by people who might actually put it to work.

Sources for the figures at the URLs below:
Eurostat - Tables, Graphs and Maps Interface (TGM) table
Eurostat - Tables, Graphs and Maps Interface (TGM) table
Yes lets give the Irish land to the "hard" working Dubs , talk about another Zimbabwe :roll:
 

gerhard dengler

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Feb 3, 2011
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46,739
In Ireland, a farm labour force of 270,000 produces gross value added (i.e., value of what they produce less cost of inputs) of €2,345m. That’s about €8,700 each.

In UK (which doesn’t even regard itself as an agricultural country) a farm labour force of 431,000 produces gross value added of €9,602m. That’s €22,280 each, making them more than twice as productive.

Put simply, our agricultural sector is in the wrong hands and we should have a policy of prising the land out of the hands of the current unproductive cohort of farmers, so that it can be accessed by people who might actually put it to work.

Sources for the figures at the URLs below:
Eurostat - Tables, Graphs and Maps Interface (TGM) table
Eurostat - Tables, Graphs and Maps Interface (TGM) table
When travelling through the countryside, it is noticeable the amount of "unattended to" land that there is throughout our country.
OK, not all land is "farmable", but the amount of non-tilled non-dairy land in this country tells it's own tale.
 

Crack hoe

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Nov 13, 2012
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1,291
Yes a 5 year plan... The townies will go out and show those farmers a thing or two about industrial farming high quantity low quality.
 

PBP voter

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Yes lets give the Irish land to the "hard" working Dubs , talk about another Zimbabwe :roll:
You come from the slums of Clondalkin PO'Neill. :roll:
 

PBP voter

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The big difference is economy of scale.

There are approximately 139,600 family farms in Ireland with an average size of 32.5 hectares per holding- CSO.

. By far the largest average size of agricultural holdings in any of the EU Member States in 2013 was the 133 hectares recorded for the Czech Republic, with the second highest average recorded in the United Kingdom at 94 hectares. Six Member States reported average sizes below 10.0 hectares, with the smallest averages in Romania, Cyprus and Malta.
Farm structure statistics - Statistics Explained
 

Analyzer

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Feb 14, 2011
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After Brexit Ireland's agricultural production will decrease.

Those farmers can work for those fitms Charlie Flanagan keeps talking about but which seem shy about doing anything.
 


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