Irish food security post Brexit

truthisfree

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No, that's not what it means.

Check the origin of fresh fruit and veg while you are there. Then ask the nice person managing the store how the stock is sourced.

In particular, ask if it get here via the UK landbridge. If you want to look smart, mention in passing that you understand the UK land bridge involves travel by air and sea seeing as how we are two islands. That's clever for these parts.

Mostly, open your mind.
yes you are 100% correct Schuhart, I was shopping Friday and yesterday and checked out loads of things, we would have severe shortages if there is a hard Brexit and god knows how long they might last, anything from days to months also the prices could spiral here as businesses up prices in order to survive. We won't starve but we will be paying through the nose for anything approaching a luxury good.

Hard Brexit would cause chaos, hence the EU offering a two year transition period.
 


madmullah

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A change to good old Irish food, beef, lamb, fish, chicken, potatoes, carrots beetroot, AH, it will cement our people, cut obesity.

Bring it on. I can shoot the odd rabbit Plenty of porter too, whiskey. Yummy
Looking at the degree of obesity in Ireland I think a bit less processed food might be a much better option. I am shocked that Ireland exports so much raw food to have it processed in the UK. surely it would make sense to process it nearer to source , reduce bulk and then export from here.. or is that just too simple.?
How much of this demand for exotic fruits such as Kiwi, Avos, etc adds to climate change, pollution etc.
When I lived in Ireland I grew my own spuds, cabbages,tomatoes, turnip. Peas Lettuce and even had cumcumbers growing in the house. I also caught the odd rabit, even had a ferret for catching rabbits and fished a lot. While not self sufficient we reduced food bills as well as getting good exercise .simpler times. but perhaps that is waht society needs to do,.to get awy from the rate race of consumerism..
 

shiel

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The impact on the GFA was an indirect consequence. They did not vote to tear up the GFA. I doubt many of them even knew, or even know now, about the GFA. Stop yer bloody hyperbole shiel for fup sake. There's enough of that aulds sh1te around.
In other words 'Paddy shut your gob' and know your place.

The answer to that has to be NO.

The fact that a treaty of such historical importance drawing a line under the consequences of nearly eight centuries of colonial exploitation was ignored says it all about the contempt for this democratic republic that Brexit represents.

The fact that economic war was declared on this democratic republic and former colony through Brexit says it all about the contempt that Brexit represents.

The fact that Brexiteers are gloating at the fact that this former colony is in danger of being damaged says it all about the contempt of the Brexiteers for the citizens of this democratic republic and former colony.
 

brughahaha

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yes you are 100% correct Schuhart, I was shopping Friday and yesterday and checked out loads of things, we would have severe shortages if there is a hard Brexit and god knows how long they might last, anything from days to months also the prices could spiral here as businesses up prices in order to survive. We won't starve but we will be paying through the nose for anything approaching a luxury good.

Hard Brexit would cause chaos, hence the EU offering a two year transition period.
People have such short memories ...prior to the arrival of Aldi and Lidl we paid extortionate amounts for food .It wasn't until I spent 6 months in Germany and France (the early 90's) that I realised just how expensive food was in ireland.

Hard border and we'll exceed that and then some , or do people really believe that Aldi Lidl Tesco and Musgraves are going to absorb and not pass on the massive investment required in new logistic hubs and additional transport costs in replacing UK goods from mainland Europe (or failing that tariffs on UK goods) a Hard brexit would cause ....Yes because these companies are known for their munificence :roll:

Actually its P.ie ..... they probably believe they will or the EU will subsidise our food :petunia:
 

valamhic

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In other words 'Paddy shut your gob' and know your place.

The answer to that has to be NO.

The fact that a treaty of such historical importance drawing a line under the consequences of nearly eight centuries of colonial exploitation was ignored says it all about the contempt for this democratic republic that Brexit represents.

The fact that economic war was declared on this democratic republic and former colony through Brexit says it all about the contempt that Brexit represents.

The fact that Brexiteers are gloating at the fact that this former colony is in danger of being damaged says it all about the contempt of the Brexiteers for the citizens of this democratic republic and former colony.
Bullsh1te. The problem hear is hysterical lefties looking for notice. Ireland has an obesity problem and mothers cooking dinners for hungry kids experience the electricity meter switching off.. The Irish border is a huge inhibitor on Teresa May's efforts to deliver Brexit , she bent over backwards.
 

valamhic

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Looking at the degree of obesity in Ireland I think a bit less processed food might be a much better option. I am shocked that Ireland exports so much raw food to have it processed in the UK. surely it would make sense to process it nearer to source , reduce bulk and then export from here.. or is that just too simple.?
How much of this demand for exotic fruits such as Kiwi, Avos, etc adds to climate change, pollution etc.
When I lived in Ireland I grew my own spuds, cabbages,tomatoes, turnip. Peas Lettuce and even had cumcumbers growing in the house. I also caught the odd rabit, even had a ferret for catching rabbits and fished a lot. While not self sufficient we reduced food bills as well as getting good exercise .simpler times. but perhaps that is waht society needs to do,.to get awy from the rate race of consumerism..
I suppose it is down to how you count food. Who compiled the list which lead to the claim that Ireland faces food shortages. Its ridiculous.

A lot of people may not know this, but the EU prohibits the import of process coffee, cocoa and Chocolate from Africa, All chocolate sold in Irish Shops is grown out side the EU, but processed in EU countries. You cannot buy a bar of African processed chocolate in Ireland.
 

Watcher2

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In other words 'Paddy shut your gob' and know your place.

The answer to that has to be NO.

The fact that a treaty of such historical importance drawing a line under the consequences of nearly eight centuries of colonial exploitation was ignored says it all about the contempt for this democratic republic that Brexit represents.

The fact that economic war was declared on this democratic republic and former colony through Brexit says it all about the contempt that Brexit represents.

The fact that Brexiteers are gloating at the fact that this former colony is in danger of being damaged says it all about the contempt of the Brexiteers for the citizens of this democratic republic and former colony.
So that's a NO on the hyperbole then. Jaysus, you're almost as bad as that Patel one.

Oh well.
 

FunkyBoogaloo

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Not to worry, Irish farmers will still be able to milk the EU and taxpayers for every dime they think they're worth.

70% of all monies Ireland has ever received from the EU (and EEC) has gone to farmers.


Now all one has to do is garner the total amount of monies the EU has given Ireland over the last 45 years to see what kind of tit the farmers have been suckling at.
 

Schuhart

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Sounds strange, don't think planes normally need the help of a bridge.
This will surprise you greatly, then.

"There is widespread concern amongst Ireland’s exporters that this critical ‘air truck’ transit arrangement, using the UK as a land-bridge to reach international airports with large freight hubs - will be jeopardised when Brexit fully kicks in, as the current system is facilitated by the EU free trade agreement"

Air freight deals up in the air over Brexit worries | Irish Examiner
 

madmullah

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I suppose it is down to how you count food. Who compiled the list which lead to the claim that Ireland faces food shortages. Its ridiculous.

A lot of people may not know this, but the EU prohibits the import of process coffee, cocoa and Chocolate from Africa, All chocolate sold in Irish Shops is grown out side the EU, but processed in EU countries. You cannot buy a bar of African processed chocolate in Ireland.
Most African Chocolate taht I have tasted is terrible .
 

truthisfree

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I suppose it is down to how you count food. Who compiled the list which lead to the claim that Ireland faces food shortages. Its ridiculous.

A lot of people may not know this, but the EU prohibits the import of process coffee, cocoa and Chocolate from Africa, All chocolate sold in Irish Shops is grown out side the EU, but processed in EU countries. You cannot buy a bar of African processed chocolate in Ireland.
Incorrect, I have bought coffee from Africa several times, not my favourite but.
 

Schuhart

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Still deep denial
Ireland overtaken at the top of world food security rankings 10 December 2018 Free

Singapore has overtaken Ireland at the top of the food security index with Ireland scoring highly for access to finance for farmers and nutritional standards.
Folk might consider this in the light of
The Food We Eat | AVA


With little farming land and limited fishing grounds, Singapore imports over 90% of the food consumed in the country.
I'd like to see any similarly clear expression of the challenge from any Irish State body.

At any rate, folk should appreciate that "food security" as measured by that index has nothing to do with the Brexit challenge - what happens if imports are disrupted?

Meanwhile, our discourse pushes the issue back out of sight
UK will not use threats of food shortages on Ireland, May insists - The Irish World

Last week, EU agriculture commissioner Phil Hogan said that a tactic Patel alluded to would, in fact, lead to “the starvation of the British people” due to Ireland’s food production surplus with the UK.

Ireland imports more than €4 billion in food from the UK each year which constitutes just under half of all food imports. Irish food exports to the UK, however, exceed €5 billion.
We've a population less than one tenth of the size of the UK.

What does that suggest about the relative importance of our respective food imports/exports?

Would someone expect that €5 billion of imports by a country with a population of over 60 million would equate in importance to imports of €4 billion by a country with a population of less than 5 million?

Are people really so dense?
 

brughahaha

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Coveney accused of giving 'pathetic' answers on 'no-deal' planning




Will be interesting to see that. I suspect that absolutely nothing has been done as yet but at least this will be a start.
Your expecting a state apparatus that cant build a childrens hospital in 20 years to have plans in place to deal with the sundering of an 800 year old economic and social relationship that was the bedrock of the Irish economy in under 6 months .....

I can tell you as a business owner ....fook all has been done

Leo either through ideological blindness or through a calculated risk bet the house on the backstop ...thats going to be the deal breaker and Leos just lost ......but official Ireland is still refusing ....just like the end of the Celtic Tiger and the "soft landing" to actually acknowledge just how deep the sh!t we are in , is.
 

truthisfree

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Your expecting a state apparatus that cant build a childrens hospital in 20 years to have plans in place to deal with the sundering of an 800 year old economic and social relationship that was the bedrock of the Irish economy in under 6 months .....

I can tell you as a business owner ....fook all has been done

Leo either through ideological blindness or through a calculated risk bet the house on the backstop ...thats going to be the deal breaker and Leos just lost ......but official Ireland is still refusing ....just like the end of the Celtic Tiger and the "soft landing" to actually acknowledge just how deep the sh!t we are in , is.
Agreed, There has been a general belief that there would be a deal and it looks very likely that they will just fall off the cliff.
 

Schuhart

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Denial is official policy
Varadkar reveals Irish government not making any preparations for hard border, despite EU warnings - Independent.ie

Mr Coveney said there is no risk of food shortages but work is underway to ensure the supply of certain medicines continues unbroken.
This is the line, despite the same article saying
Hundreds of thousands of litres of milk from the Republic of Ireland goes to Northern Ireland to be processed daily, before making its way back down here onto supermarket shelves.
In other words, even the fraction of domestically produced food that can be sourced from our primary agricultural production has a dependency on cross-border trade.

That's saying nothing about the huge proportion that simply comes through the UK.
 

Myler

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Judging from this thread, the problem could be seen at least a year ago.

The political situation is worse. No more nice Mrs May, and Priti Patel (who's instinct is to make life difficult for Ireland as a bargaining tool) is now a senior Minister.

One of the country's largest retailers, Tesco, has already warned that a no-deal Brexit at the end of October would be more difficult than it would have been at the end of March.

The company will have less storage capacity later in the year as it stockpiles goods in the run-up to Christmas.

The Central Bank has also warned of potential food shortages in the event of no-deal.

Ireland is heavily reliant on the so-called UK landbridge, which provides for the movement of Irish exports and imports to and from the EU using the UK road and port infrastructure.

Three million tons of Irish traffic goes via the landbridge annually including many time-sensitive food imports.
I'm not sure of the extent to which we've even clearly identified the extent to which we depend on food imports; I expect its a lot more than isolated products.
 

raetsel

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Judging from this thread, the problem could be seen at least a year ago.

The political situation is worse. No more nice Mrs May, and Priti Patel (who's instinct is to make life difficult for Ireland as a bargaining tool) is now a senior Minister.I'm not sure of the extent to which we've even clearly identified the extent to which we depend on food imports; I expect its a lot more than isolated products.
A significant portion of that comes from NI. For example a third of NI's milk production and 50% of lambs reared are exported south for processing. That will affect jobs and exports mainly.
At a guess I'd bet that most other food imports from the UK fall into the non essential category, e.g. alcohol, ready meals, biscuits and confectionery.
Bitchi Patel won't starve you out, in other words.:)
 

Strawberry

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Judging from this thread, the problem could be seen at least a year ago.

The political situation is worse. No more nice Mrs May, and Priti Patel (who's instinct is to make life difficult for Ireland as a bargaining tool) is now a senior Minister.I'm not sure of the extent to which we've even clearly identified the extent to which we depend on food imports; I expect its a lot more than isolated products.
We don't depend on food imports at all, Ireland is the most food secure nation on earth, according to the OECD.
 

Pyewacket

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We don't depend on food imports at all, Ireland is the most food secure nation on earth, according to the OECD.
That is disingenuous. The report does not say Ireland is the most food secure nation because it currently feeds its entire population by itself., but because while the status quo is in place, it has improved food availability, quality and safety to its population.
 

Strawberry

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That is disingenuous. The report does not say Ireland is the most food secure nation because it currently feeds its entire population by itself., but because while the status quo is in place, it has improved food availability, quality and safety to its population.
It actually says that Ireland produces enough food annually to feed about 35 million people.
 

Finbar10

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We don't depend on food imports at all, Ireland is the most food secure nation on earth, according to the OECD.
That study ranks countries on several factors like food affordability, quality etc. While it is the case that Ireland could, potentially, feed something like 30 million people, that's far from being the case. We're a one-trick pony with most farming raising cows, whether for beef or dairy. That's very inefficient compared to, say, crowing cereal crops, which we grow a lot less than even we used to. A field of cereals will produce multiples of calories than say a field of cows. That's why we are clear net importers of calories (a deficit equivalent to needing to feed 2.5 million or so people).
 

Pyewacket

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It actually says that Ireland produces enough food annually to feed about 35 million people.
It does not say Ireland does that now.

Stop for a minute and ask yourself what Ireland would have to do and how it would have to change before it became a country which was entirely self sufficient in food.

This is not a mickey waving exercise. It is entirely serious.
 

silverharp

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once there is beef and pork im good
 


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