Irish food security post Brexit

Strawberry

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That study ranks countries on several factors like food affordability, quality etc. While it is the case that Ireland could, potentially, feed something like 30 million people, that's far from being the case. We're a one-trick pony with most farming raising cows, whether for beef or dairy. That's very inefficient compared to, say, crowing cereal crops, which we grow a lot less than even we used to. A field of cereals will produce multiples of calories than say a field of cows. That's why we are clear net importers of calories (a deficit equivalent to needing to feed 2.5 million or so people).
Maybe that will be one of the good things about Brexit then - to make beef farming less desirable.
 


silverharp

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Maybe that will be one of the good things about Brexit then - to make beef farming less desirable.
hat does that mean? grains and cereals make people fat, you should be proud of our beef and dairy industry , among the best quality in the world
 

McTell

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No
Maybe that will be one of the good things about Brexit then - to make beef farming less desirable.

If it makes beef cheaper then the consumer wins.

The farmer is getting a big grant from bruxelles. Win-win.
 

Strawberry

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hat does that mean? grains and cereals make people fat, you should be proud of our beef and dairy industry , among the best quality in the world
I am proud of our beef and dairy industry, but it wouldn't do any harm to diversify either.
 

McTell

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No
I am proud of our beef and dairy industry, but it wouldn't do any harm to diversify either.
Like vineyards, thanks to global warming. Bring it on.

What's the irish for viticulteur again?
 

Myler

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At a guess I'd bet that most other food imports from the UK fall into the non essential category, e.g. alcohol, ready meals, biscuits and confectionery.
Unfortunately, the guess would be wrong. Our agri-food sector does not even meet basic domestic needs. For instance, we'd be short of bread without the UK.

Since Ireland produces virtually no large-scale milling wheat used for sliced pan bread, it imports 80pc of flour, the majority of which comes from the UK.
We even import potatoes from the UK.
The report does not say Ireland is the most food secure nation because it currently feeds its entire population by itself., but because while the status quo is in place, it has improved food availability, quality and safety to its population.
Absolutely. Singapore, similarly, scores very highly for food security, despite having very little domestic food production. Our food security depends on the UK supply chain, which is about to be interrupted.
That's why we are clear net importers of calories (a deficit equivalent to needing to feed 2.5 million or so people).
Is if fair to say, very few people know that we depend on imports for half of our basic food needs.

But many people have heard this myth that we produce enough food to feed 35 million. That fake statistic is refuted in an earlier post on this thread
we produce beef with a calorie content equivalent to the needs of 1.9 million people.
 

runwiththewind

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Like vineyards, thanks to global warming. Bring it on.

What's the irish for viticulteur again?
Wine is being produced in Wexford.
 

raetsel

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Unfortunately, the guess would be wrong. Our agri-food sector does not even meet basic domestic needs. For instance, we'd be short of bread without the UK.We even import potatoes from the UK.
You'd actually be short of the flour to make the bread. However, Germany and France produce more wheat and potatoes than the UK. There are alternative supply sources. Ireland is not necessarily dependent on the UK for either but the government and importers need to get on the ball now and make provision to secure those alternative supplies, and, of course, stockpile. Fortunately both of those staples have a long storage life.
Ironically the bread we (*our family) buy here in NI is made in Dublin.
 

Myler

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You'd actually be short of the flour to make the bread.
Which is sort of the point. You'll appreciate, the point is that our UK food imports include the basic essentials.
However, Germany and France produce more wheat and potatoes than the UK. There are alternative supply sources.
And that's where the complications start. Our supply systems route those sources through the UK, the so-called "land bridge", and setting up a new route is one of those things that's easy to say and hard to do.

Its not just running a truck, or a ship, around the UK. Our warehousing space assumes that we're drawing on stocks in the UK. The journey time is longer, and obviously the volume of goods will be less. That will impact cost and viability of supply.

But, more to the point, a hard Brexit means problems for supply as there won't be any of the agreed temporary solutions that attempt to keep the current supply route going.

Cost and viability may resolve itself, in time. But an unplanned interruption will simply mean shortages.
 

raetsel

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Which is sort of the point. You'll appreciate, the point is that our UK food imports include the basic essentials.And that's where the complications start. Our supply systems route those sources through the UK, the so-called "land bridge", and setting up a new route is one of those things that's easy to say and hard to do.

Its not just running a truck, or a ship, around the UK. Our warehousing space assumes that we're drawing on stocks in the UK. The journey time is longer, and obviously the volume of goods will be less. That will impact cost and viability of supply.

But, more to the point, a hard Brexit means problems for supply as there won't be any of the agreed temporary solutions that attempt to keep the current supply route going.

Cost and viability may resolve itself, in time. But an unplanned interruption will simply mean shortages.
Not necessarily with careful planning and sensible stockpiling.
 

devonish

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Not necessarily with careful planning and sensible stockpiling.
Unfortunately the sea journey from Rosslare or Cork to any of the European ports involves a significant sea journey, in addition I'd guess that there are more problems with weather and rough seas. Ireland is dependent upon the land bridge and will continue to rely on it whether it imports/exports to the UK or to the EU.
 

raetsel

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Unfortunately the sea journey from Rosslare or Cork to any of the European ports involves a significant sea journey, in addition I'd guess that there are more problems with weather and rough seas. Ireland is dependent upon the land bridge and will continue to rely on it whether it imports/exports to the UK or to the EU.
From what I've read I think it takes about 8 to 10 hours longer than the land bridge, to Zeebrugge.
In the long term the land bridge will still be an option, but if the UK crashes out there will probably be weeks if not months of delays at Dover. Ireland needs an alternative in the short term though.
 

wombat

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From what I've read I think it takes about 8 to 10 hours longer than the land bridge, to Zeebrugge.
In the long term the land bridge will still be an option, but if the UK crashes out there will probably be weeks if not months of delays at Dover. Ireland needs an alternative in the short term though.
The advantage of the landbridge is speed. I was surprised to hear that most traffic goes through Dublin, I would have thought Larne would be the main port. If Brexit causes delays at the channel ports, it may be faster to travel by sea rather than through the UK.
 

raetsel

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The advantage of the landbridge is speed. I was surprised to hear that most traffic goes through Dublin, I would have thought Larne would be the main port. If Brexit causes delays at the channel ports, it may be faster to travel by sea rather than through the UK.
It doesn't surprise me. It's been a while since I did the Larne/Stranraer sailing but the roads weren't too hot until you got to Dumfries or thereabouts last time, and it's a long drive down through England with the potential to hit long tailbacks around greater Manchester and again as you approach the West Midlands. Dublin-Holyhead offers better roads plus fewer dangers of delays as a result of tailbacks I'd guess.
A lot of northern hauliers use Dublin and that was made a more attractive option since they opened the Port Tunnel, which is a godsend for northerners heading to the Aviva Stadium or the RDS. I went down to see Fleetwood Mac in June in the RDS and was able to get out of Dublin after the concert in no time thanks to it.
 

wombat

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It doesn't surprise me. It's been a while since I did the Larne/Stranraer sailing but the roads weren't too hot until you got to Dumfries or thereabouts
Don't worry, Boris is going to build a bridge or tunnel to keep the DUP sweet. :)
 

raetsel

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Don't worry, Boris is going to build a bridge or tunnel to keep the DUP sweet. :)
The bridge to nowhere. Ridiculous we are even discussing it. I suspect you'll see an all Ireland final hosted at Windsor Park sooner. :ROFLMAO:
 

Dame_Enda

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I hope Brexit will lead to increased investment in Rosslare, which has been neglected by successive govts. There is a silver lining to Brexit.
 

Dame_Enda

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Newsnight reporting that one third of NI's milk exports transits the Republic (700-800 million litres). The manufacturers pay 26p per litre of UK milk, which would increase to 45p in Republic under 19p tariffs. it may no longer be legal to mix milk from North and South. Speculation a cull will be necessary in NI to meet reduce demand.

Food Minister is on now saying the govt hasnt considered a cull. Says this is "Project Fear". Presenter responding it would be farmers that carry out the cull.
 


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