Irish government may approve a new neonicotinoid-related insecticide

Toland

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www.aggressive-secularist.com
Neonic insecticides are a variety of pesticides that use chemicals similar to stuff found in nicotina plants (which include tobacco). They are controversial as there appears to be lots of evidence that they are harmful to bees.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neonicotinoid

France recently put a blanket ban on all Neonic insecticides within the country's territory.

Brussels has recently approved a new insecticide with the chemical name "flupyradifurone" developed by Bayer, which it will be selling under the brand name "Sivanto". It works in a similar way to neonicotinoids.

There's an on-line petition been put up to ask the Irish government not to give it the green light.

https://actions.sumofus.org/a/keep-bayer-s-risky-new-insecticide-out-of-ireland?sp_ref=230060489.99.173630.f.551581.5&source=fb

Here's Bayer's own technical information on the product:

http://www.sivanto.com/doc/Technical-Information-SIVANTO.pdf

What do posters think?
 


Spanner Island

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Feb 22, 2011
Messages
23,974
Neonic insecticides are a variety of pesticides that use chemicals similar to stuff found in nicotina plants (which include tobacco). They are controversial as there appears to be lots of evidence that they are harmful to bees.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neonicotinoid

France recently put a blanket ban on all Neonic insecticides within the country's territory.

Brussels has recently approved a new insecticide with the chemical name "flupyradifurone" developed by Bayer, which it will be selling under the brand name "Sivanto". It works in a similar way to neonicotinoids.

There's an on-line petition been put up to ask the Irish government not to give it the green light.

https://actions.sumofus.org/a/keep-bayer-s-risky-new-insecticide-out-of-ireland?sp_ref=230060489.99.173630.f.551581.5&source=fb

Here's Bayer's own technical information on the product:

http://www.sivanto.com/doc/Technical-Information-SIVANTO.pdf

What do posters think?
I think planet Earth would be a lot better off without human beings.
 

RasherHash

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Jan 16, 2013
Messages
24,589
Neonic insecticides are a variety of pesticides that use chemicals similar to stuff found in nicotina plants (which include tobacco). They are controversial as there appears to be lots of evidence that they are harmful to bees.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neonicotinoid

France recently put a blanket ban on all Neonic insecticides within the country's territory.

Brussels has recently approved a new insecticide with the chemical name "flupyradifurone" developed by Bayer, which it will be selling under the brand name "Sivanto". It works in a similar way to neonicotinoids.

There's an on-line petition been put up to ask the Irish government not to give it the green light.

https://actions.sumofus.org/a/keep-bayer-s-risky-new-insecticide-out-of-ireland?sp_ref=230060489.99.173630.f.551581.5&source=fb

Here's Bayer's own technical information on the product:

http://www.sivanto.com/doc/Technical-Information-SIVANTO.pdf

What do posters think?
If there is evidence they are bad for bees, then no.
 

ShoutingIsLeadership

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Get Apple to agree with you, and our government will fight the EU like dogs, on this
 

former wesleyan

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Karloff

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Jun 5, 2015
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Neonic insecticides are a variety of pesticides that use chemicals similar to stuff found in nicotina plants (which include tobacco). They are controversial as there appears to be lots of evidence that they are harmful to bees.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neonicotinoid

France recently put a blanket ban on all Neonic insecticides within the country's territory.

Brussels has recently approved a new insecticide with the chemical name "flupyradifurone" developed by Bayer, which it will be selling under the brand name "Sivanto". It works in a similar way to neonicotinoids.

There's an on-line petition been put up to ask the Irish government not to give it the green light.

https://actions.sumofus.org/a/keep-bayer-s-risky-new-insecticide-out-of-ireland?sp_ref=230060489.99.173630.f.551581.5&source=fb

Here's Bayer's own technical information on the product:

http://www.sivanto.com/doc/Technical-Information-SIVANTO.pdf

What do posters think?
If it's a matter between greedy farmers and the environment then the environment won't stand a chance.

Is it not enough we give them so many subsidies already, must they poison every other living thing?

Birth control for the Third World and manners put on the agribusiness industry now.
 

soubresauts

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Jun 2, 2007
Messages
3,127
If history is anything to go by Ireland will plough its own chemical-intensive furrow on this, whatever the rest of Europe is doing. (And the rest of Europe is generally sensible about the risks of poisoning land and wildlife.)

After so many centuries of being serfs of England, not to mention the Famine, we finally got control of our own land. But immediately we ran to the chemical companies who promised "higher yields", "no pests", "less effort", and so on. Especially for potatoes and sugar beet, the two most chemical-intensive crops ever grown in Ireland.

There was no stopping the onward rush into chemical farming. Sugar beet meant that Ireland could produce its own sugar -- that indicator of progress and civilization(!) -- and at last snub its nose at British sugar produced (cheaply) from sugar cane in the slave colonies.

By the 1950s almost every Irish child was suffering from tooth decay, not to mention the other effects of sugar consumption. Uh-oh, public health problem, but, hark, there's a chemical solution, from our wonderful anti-communist friends across the Atlantic. Soon enough, with an Irish-American president in the White House, and generous cash grants from Washington, we have a mandatory fluoridation policy in place.

OK, Kennedy had been done away with just before fluoridation started here, but Irish blind faith in everything coming from America continued for quite a while...

Soon enough America was offering us another miracle chemical to solve all our problems -- Roundup by Monsanto. Kills every plant, with no discrimination (except Monsanto's GMOs, natch). Bye bye weeds. Boy, didn't we just love it. Even more than all those other great chemicals. "It's a quare name, but great stuff."

I have travelled in many countries but nowhere have I seen Roundup used so indiscriminately as in Ireland. You see the ugly effects everywhere, from the moment you're leaving the terminal in Dublin Airport.

As Ireland became Roundup's number one fan, just about every big pharmachem company was invited to set up in Ireland with tax breaks and lax environmental standards.

And so we arrive at present-day Ireland -- toxic chemicals being sprayed everywhere, in fields, parks, gardens, and along the roads; pharmachem factories churning out product at significant environmental cost (and paying little tax); everyone being dosed with unmeasured amounts of fluoride -- a cumulative poison -- supposedly to "deal with" the ongoing scourge of tooth decay, which has one cause -- sugar!

And now Bayer are buying Monsanto for $66 billion!

Bees? Honey? Who needs honey when we've got sugar? By the way, Ireland doesn't produce any sugar now. It's all imported...
 

Watcher2

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Joined
May 2, 2010
Messages
34,341
Neonic insecticides are a variety of pesticides that use chemicals similar to stuff found in nicotina plants (which include tobacco). They are controversial as there appears to be lots of evidence that they are harmful to bees.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neonicotinoid

France recently put a blanket ban on all Neonic insecticides within the country's territory.

Brussels has recently approved a new insecticide with the chemical name "flupyradifurone" developed by Bayer, which it will be selling under the brand name "Sivanto". It works in a similar way to neonicotinoids.

There's an on-line petition been put up to ask the Irish government not to give it the green light.

https://actions.sumofus.org/a/keep-bayer-s-risky-new-insecticide-out-of-ireland?sp_ref=230060489.99.173630.f.551581.5&source=fb

Here's Bayer's own technical information on the product:

http://www.sivanto.com/doc/Technical-Information-SIVANTO.pdf

What do posters think?
Is it jobs or brown envelops?
 

Falco

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Messages
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Mad as Fish

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If it's a matter between greedy farmers and the environment then the environment won't stand a chance.

Is it not enough we give them so many subsidies already, must they poison every other living thing?

Birth control for the Third World and manners put on the agribusiness industry now.
Whoa there!

Have you ate well today, do you expect to go hungry tomorrow? I doubt it so you might want to slow down and start engaging the brain a little before shooting off at farmers.

Farmers are in business, they have a living to make and knowing this successive governments in the west have ensured they achieve the best returns by following the governments bidding. Subsidies are indeed an important part of that but the farmer is often just the middleman and input prices (especially chemicals) are often set by what the makers think the farmer can afford, not by how much the stuff costs to make while on the other end the big food processors will also work to the same philosophy and seek to buy at a price that allows a farmers survival but no more. Tesco's et al hate the open cattle markets because they can't control them half as much as they would like to.

If you want pesticide free crops and an end to intensive farming then all you need do is persuade your friends and family to buy organic rather than chastise farmers for doing as your elected representatives have decided. If the demand is there they'll throw the sprayers in the ditch tomorrow.
 

Mad as Fish

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Joined
Dec 6, 2012
Messages
24,185
If history is anything to go by Ireland will plough its own chemical-intensive furrow on this, whatever the rest of Europe is doing. (And the rest of Europe is generally sensible about the risks of poisoning land and wildlife.)

After so many centuries of being serfs of England, not to mention the Famine, we finally got control of our own land. But immediately we ran to the chemical companies who promised "higher yields", "no pests", "less effort", and so on. Especially for potatoes and sugar beet, the two most chemical-intensive crops ever grown in Ireland.

There was no stopping the onward rush into chemical farming. Sugar beet meant that Ireland could produce its own sugar -- that indicator of progress and civilization(!) -- and at last snub its nose at British sugar produced (cheaply) from sugar cane in the slave colonies.

By the 1950s almost every Irish child was suffering from tooth decay, not to mention the other effects of sugar consumption. Uh-oh, public health problem, but, hark, there's a chemical solution, from our wonderful anti-communist friends across the Atlantic. Soon enough, with an Irish-American president in the White House, and generous cash grants from Washington, we have a mandatory fluoridation policy in place.

OK, Kennedy had been done away with just before fluoridation started here, but Irish blind faith in everything coming from America continued for quite a while...

Soon enough America was offering us another miracle chemical to solve all our problems -- Roundup by Monsanto. Kills every plant, with no discrimination (except Monsanto's GMOs, natch). Bye bye weeds. Boy, didn't we just love it. Even more than all those other great chemicals. "It's a quare name, but great stuff."

I have travelled in many countries but nowhere have I seen Roundup used so indiscriminately as in Ireland. You see the ugly effects everywhere, from the moment you're leaving the terminal in Dublin Airport.

As Ireland became Roundup's number one fan, just about every big pharmachem company was invited to set up in Ireland with tax breaks and lax environmental standards.

And so we arrive at present-day Ireland -- toxic chemicals being sprayed everywhere, in fields, parks, gardens, and along the roads; pharmachem factories churning out product at significant environmental cost (and paying little tax); everyone being dosed with unmeasured amounts of fluoride -- a cumulative poison -- supposedly to "deal with" the ongoing scourge of tooth decay, which has one cause -- sugar!

And now Bayer are buying Monsanto for $66 billion!

Bees? Honey? Who needs honey when we've got sugar? By the way, Ireland doesn't produce any sugar now. It's all imported...
Ahem, I'm, not sure how Ireland can be Roundup's biggest fan when we don't grow GM crops here, but carry on for as rants go it's a beaut.
 

Mad as Fish

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Dec 6, 2012
Messages
24,185
Back to the original question then no, I don't think we can allow another pesticide to enter the food chain without an absolute clean bill of health. Unfortunately pesticides by their very nature are there to kill organisms and no matter how selective we are assured they are there will always be 'collateral damage', and if we don't see it now then it will certainly appear later as is the way with these things.

Glyphosphate has already been mentioned and as an example it should carry all sorts of warnings, non more so than that there is resistance building up in weed populations due to over use on GM crops, exactly the same will eventually happen with any new insecticide, it's just a question of when, not if.

To break out of this cycle of forever seeking new chemicals as the old ones fail we need to reassess the priorities in food production, and we need to start at the consumer end of the system rather than with the suppliers for agriculture is only doing what people want and that is supplying cheap and plentiful food.
 

soubresauts

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Messages
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Ahem, I'm, not sure how Ireland can be Roundup's biggest fan when we don't grow GM crops here, but carry on for as rants go it's a beaut.
My rant was a historical run-through, and going back 30 years the big GM crops -- soya and maize -- were novelties, while Ireland was already sold bigtime on Roundup. It wasn't so much an agriculture thing back then; it was more for parks, gardens, landscaping, horticulture, roadside maintenance, and so on. Nowadays of course enormous amounts of glyphosate are being spread on fields all over North and South America.

It is particularly worrying that vast areas of Argentina, Paraguay and Brazil are given over to GM soya, with the resultant economic dependence. That crop then goes to farm animals all over the world. Soya (apart from the fermented forms like miso) is not a healthy food for any animal, though little notice is taken of that because most farm animals don't live very long.
 


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