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Irish Land Commission formation and early duties - knowledge?


RyeSixSeven

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Oct 27, 2006
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410
Im doing some research into some historic land issues and seeking someone with knowledge of the activities of the Land Commission in the 1920's 1930s.

Among their duties after the foundation of the Irish Free state in 1922 was facilitating the transfer of land ownership from Landlords to tenants, re-distribution etc. The process appears to have been set out in the land acts of 1923 etc.

What is vesting, and how does it relate. Did they do some sort of formal act in 1931? Help appreciated.
 

diaspora-mick

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Oct 19, 2011
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Im doing some research into some historic land issues and seeking someone with knowledge of the activities of the Land Commission in the 1920's 1930s.

Among their duties after the foundation of the Irish Free state in 1922 was facilitating the transfer of land ownership from Landlords to tenants, re-distribution etc. The process appears to have been set out in the land acts of 1923 etc.

What is vesting, and how does it relate. Did they do some sort of formal act in 1931? Help appreciated.
Well you could start here for example:
Davitt: Irish Patriot and Father of the Land League
 

McTell

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Oct 16, 2012
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No
Im doing some research into some historic land issues and seeking someone with knowledge of the activities of the Land Commission in the 1920's 1930s.

Among their duties after the foundation of the Irish Free state in 1922 was facilitating the transfer of land ownership from Landlords to tenants, re-distribution etc. The process appears to have been set out in the land acts of 1923 etc.

What is vesting, and how does it relate. Did they do some sort of formal act in 1931? Help appreciated.
The Land Commission dated from the 1880s and its big achievements were the 1903 Act and a 1909 Act allowing compulsory purchase. The 1923 Act was a tidying up by the Free State and it was abolished in about 1983.

Vesting is where an interest in land (e.g. a lease or the freehold) starts to belong to someone. A future "vesting day" would be the date that an interest is due to pass from A to B.

This would do an inter-cert student:
Irish Land Commission - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
L

Little Room

I've not posted enough to start a thread, and this one was the nearest to my question-

Could anyone suggest some good books on the history of land rights in Cork, or all of Ireland?

Thanks
 

McTell

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No
I've not posted enough to start a thread, and this one was the nearest to my question-

Could anyone suggest some good books on the history of land rights in Cork, or all of Ireland?

Thanks
You'd have to start with the Brehon law; Norman-French feudalism; the English system. All overlapped each other. Mostly the owner of land has the rights to it.
 

harshreality

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Oct 14, 2011
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2,688
Have a read of this.

Sammon, P: In the Land Commission; A Memoir 1933-1978 (Dublin, 1997)
 

Roberto Jordan

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Jun 28, 2012
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I've not posted enough to start a thread, and this one was the nearest to my question-

Could anyone suggest some good books on the history of land rights in Cork, or all of Ireland?

Thanks
Some of the works on agrarian distrubances, particularly the Rockites , would have a large reference to Cork and land rights
 

ergo2

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Oct 4, 2008
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Thanks Neiphin for the reference to article on .Daly - he is often overlooked these days.

One of the late Judge Jophn Garavan's sons, Mark, has written a thesis on that period. John was proud of the family connection to Daly

imho the Land League was at least as important for the development of t he country as was the War of Independence
 
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L

Little Room

I've searched around a bit and made a list, but it's way longer than Idve thought. So it's good to get some recommendations. Thanks.


[QUOTE
imho the Land League was at least as important for the development of t he country as was the War of Independence[/QUOTE]

That's how it looks to me too.
 

McTell

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No
Supposing the reforms had started in the 1940s, you'd have had much bigger farms because of all the new machinery.

A farm in 1900 was worked by the family on it, paying labourers in the summer. So when the reforms kicked in the result was 300,000 (?) small farms that were barely viable.

The co-op movement made a big difference as well after 1900. Wholesale buying and selling.

On the down side most families just wanted to own their land and were not too worried about productivity. Status in the community. You'll still drive up to Sligo on the N4 and see neglected fields all over. For some the status was more important and maybe they didn't have the money for machinery, or education or a wife.
 

an modh coinniolach

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I've searched around a bit and made a list, but it's way longer than Idve thought. So it's good to get some recommendations. Thanks.


[QUOTE
imho the Land League was at least as important for the development of t he country as was the War of Independence

That's how it looks to me too.[/QUOTE]

James Donnelly, The land and the people of nineteenth-century Cork: the rural economy and the land question (1975, London: Routledge & Kegan Paul) is where you should be starting for Cork.
 

McTell

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No

ergo2

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In the 1960's about 40 acres was regarded as the economic size for a holding. The ILC developed the concept of "adjusted acres" - i.e a bigger area where the land was bad. Allowances also for the amount of commonage ( land held in common used for rough grazing )

Land Commission inspectors did trojan, patient work over the years. In the West they went into some villages where land was still held on the rundale system. Typically the "farm" was divided into small bits of land over an area. Mainly by discussion and agreement they rearranged holdings, often sorting out issues of commonage, seaweed rights etc
 
L

Little Room

asterix

thanks i'd completely forgot about the EPPI site. Can't always get into the documents, but when it's working, it's been really useful for the big picture, and for finding out what family were up to.
 
L

Little Room

an modh coinniolach;
James Donnelly, The land and the people of nineteenth-century Cork: the rural economy and the land question (1975, London: Routledge & Kegan Paul) is where you should be starting for Cork
Good to know it's worth buying. thanks.

If anyone's read Fr Hickey's book on the famine in west cork - does it say much about ownership and tenancies?
 
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