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Irish language in a United Ireland


galteeman

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Joined
Nov 6, 2010
Messages
2,397
Just for the sake of argument, if there was a united Ireland would you be in favour of forcing the Brits up North to learn Irish? Would you make it compulsory for their kids? Surely they would never accept that? What do Sinn Fein have to say about this?
 


freewillie

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Joined
Feb 3, 2013
Messages
7,453
Just for the sake of argument, if there was a united Ireland would you be in favour of forcing the Brits up North to learn Irish? Would you make it compulsory for their kids? Surely they would never accept that? What do Sinn Fein have to say about this?

SF would be too busy trying to learn Irish themselves. Its not as if West Belfast is a thriving Gaeltacht at the moment
 

Hitch 22

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Joined
Dec 26, 2011
Messages
5,220
The lunatic attempt to get us all to speak Irish has failed abysmally.
Most kids leaving Irish school celebrate never having to know or care about the Irish language for the rest of their lives.
It is an utterly useless language - who is ever going to speak it except some sheep farmer in some backwoods part of Connemara? - and the time and expense wasted on trying to drum it into kids heads would be better spent teaching them skills they can actually use in the real world - science and ICT skills for starters.
If some people want to learn Irish -fine - you can indulge your hobby on your own free time.
Kids should be taught languages like Chinese, Hindi, Russian, German, Spanish and Arabic in our schools.
We live in a global society and economic now and our curriculum should reflect that.
 
Last edited:

eyelight

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Joined
Sep 16, 2010
Messages
8,296
Just for the sake of argument, if there was a united Ireland would you be in favour of forcing the Brits up North to learn Irish? Would you make it compulsory for their kids? Surely they would never accept that? What do Sinn Fein have to say about this?
Good luck with your "United Ireland" while you use terms like "the Brits up North".

We do speak an Irish language, north and south. It's called Hiberno-English.

And I couldn't give a rat's ass what Sinn Fein have to say about anything. The views of murderers and criminal thugs shouldn't get an airing.
 

Telemachus

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Joined
Apr 8, 2004
Messages
6,565
Website
en.wikipedia.org
The Irish up north are forced to learn English.
 

Glaucon

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Joined
Aug 13, 2012
Messages
8,340
The lunatic attempt to get us all to speak Irish has failed abysmally.
Most kids leaving Irish school celebrate never having to know or care about the Irish language for the rest of their lives.
It is an utterly useless language - who is ever going to speak it except some sheep farmer in some backwoods part of Connemara? - and the time and expense wasted on trying to drum it into kids heads would be better spent teaching them skills they can actually use in the real world - science and ICT skills for starters.
If some people want to learn Irish -fine - you can indulge your hobby on your own free time.
Kids should be taught languages like Chinese, Hindi, Russian, German, Spanish and Arabic in our schools.
We live in a global society and economic now and our curriculum should reflect that.
Self-loathing West Brit alert.
 
L

longshortgrass

Their policy is a "free and Gaelic Ireland" rather than a free and bilingual Ireland.
OK, you can keep English only....providing you do something about that horrendous Norn Iron axxent. petunia
 
D

Dylan2010

Self-loathing West Brit alert.
I dont understand the self loathing comment, at worst I'd describe it as pragmatic. But who are you to tell your neighbour what they should speak? that would make you a fascist right?
 

Glaucon

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I dont understand the self loathing comment, at worst I'd describe it as pragmatic. But who are you to tell your neighbour what they should speak? that would make you a fascist right?
Self-loathing is (and apparently you are too stupid to understand such a proposition) a hatred or fear of one's own self or culture.

Secondly, you gobs*ite, it is not I who am dictating that one must/should not speak one language in particular, that would be "Irish is only for sheep farmers" Hitch 22.
 

IbrahaimMohamad

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Joined
Feb 5, 2013
Messages
4,221
The Government lack the courage or will to confront the Irish Language lobby. The only way of changing the attitude is to have people organise to withhold votes from pro Irish Language Gravy Train Parties.

Full steam ahead for the Gaeilge gravy train - Independent.ie

Only when a potential Government fear that they will lose votes for supporting Irish will things change. Make Irish Language study voluntary in Primary and Secondary Schools.
 

DT123

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Joined
Aug 31, 2011
Messages
14,286
Just for the sake of argument, if there was a united Ireland would you be in favour of forcing the Brits up North to learn Irish? Would you make it compulsory for their kids? Surely they would never accept that? What do Sinn Fein have to say about this?
Whenever you speak it yourself ,as your first language and your contry uses it exclusively,all the time,in all facets of life,come back and talk about it.(Of course no one will know what you are talking about at that stage,or care)
 

IbrahaimMohamad

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Feb 5, 2013
Messages
4,221
Adams should explain where he stands on imposing Irish on Unionists. A referendum should be held in the South on the issue of whether Irish should remain as our first language!
 
D

Dylan2010

Self-loathing is (and apparently you are too stupid to understand such a proposition) a hatred or fear of one's own self or culture.

Secondly, you gobs*ite, it is not I who am dictating that one must/should not speak one language in particular, that would be "Irish is only for sheep farmers" Hitch 22.
But its in you head, you assume just because of an accident of birth people have need to wear certain "cultural clothes". People have a right to say "its not for me" without hating anything. If someone wants to learn Latin or Greek in place of Irish, good for them, there is no "self loathing" in play.
 

Dr Pat

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 9, 2009
Messages
10,148
The lunatic attempt to get us all to speak Irish has failed abysmally.
Most kids leaving Irish school celebrate never having to know or care about the Irish language for the rest of their lives.
It is an utterly useless language - who is ever going to speak it except some sheep farmer in some backwoods part of Connemara? - and the time and expense wasted on trying to drum it into kids heads would be better spent teaching them skills they can actually use in the real world - science and ICT skills for starters.
If some people want to learn Irish -fine - you can indulge your hobby on your own free time.
Kids should be taught languages like Chinese, Hindi, Russian, German, Spanish and Arabic in our schools.
We live in a global society and economic now and our curriculum should reflect that.
What is wrong with being a sheepfarmer and more especially one from Connemara? Given your urbancentric view of Ireland, you will be disappointed to learn that there are more daily speakers of Irish in urban areas than in na Gaeltachtaí.

Was the first President of the Irish Free State who was steeped in the Irish language a 'sheepfarmer' from Connemara? Oh and wait for it, he was a Protestant! Was the late and great composer Séan Ó Riada who took the decision to move his family to the Cúil Aodha Gaeltacht to grow up in an Irish speaking community likewise a 'sheepfarmer'? Just two examples of the 'backwoodsmen' who spoke it.

You must have a very limited view of languages if you think even one of them is useless. Teaching of Irish should not preclude the teaching of other languages and research has shown that knowledge of more than one language facilitates the acquisition of others.

No one is denying that we live in a global society and that our curriculum should reflect that. Equally we should not deny that we also live in an Irish society and it is logical and right that the Irish language has a place in the education of our children. Try and argue your point of view with the Germans, the French, the Russians, the Chinese or indeed the Israelis who successfully resurrected a 'dead' language and see how far you get.

Really your post is one of the most ignorant and ill-informed comments on the Irish language so far on this thread. Did you ever travel beyond the Pale, mentally, that is? Moron.
 

rll69

Active member
Joined
Nov 2, 2012
Messages
178
I don't think that we should be forced to learn it down South. It was the biggest waste of my time when in school.
 
R

Ramps

A referendum should be held in the South on the issue of whether Irish should remain as our first language!
I'd be amazed if people voted for its removal. It's part of the bizarre relationship the Irish have with Irish.

For the most part it amounts to this: I treasure Irish, and I'm going to show how highly I regard it by making others speak it... ;)
 

IbrahaimMohamad

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Feb 5, 2013
Messages
4,221
Imagine if your Child in Primary School could have another 4 hours a week, at no extra cost, to spend on numeracy, english literacy, social development, building relationships, etc.
 

DT123

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Joined
Aug 31, 2011
Messages
14,286
No one is denying that we live in a global society and that our curriculum should reflect that. Equally we should not deny that we also live in an Irish society and it is logical and right that the Irish language has a place in the education of our children. Try and argue your point of view with the Germans, the French, the Russians, the Chinese or indeed the Israelis who successfully resurrected a 'dead' language and see how far you get.

.
If any ,or all of these countries ,routinely used English as their first language and if only a tiny fraction of their populations were fluent in their "native" languages,you might have a point.
 

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