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Irish language-zones - an idea

Dame_Enda

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I think a lot of us know at least some Irish, but are embarassed to use it in public places because of lingering post-colonial shaming which associated it with poverty and the Famine. But I think in spite of this, more would use it if the government set up designated Irish language "zones", supported by tax incentives or grants, where businesses would agree to accept communication in the Irish language (without preventing them using other languages too) from customers and/or employees.

Would you support such a scheme? I would personally speak some Irish for my shopping if there was a sign outside saying "Irish language accepted here". I think more would too.
 


DJP

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I think a lot of us know at least some Irish, but are embarassed to use it in public places because of lingering post-colonial shaming which associated it with poverty and the Famine. But I think in spite of this, more would use it if the government set up designated Irish language "zones", supported by tax incentives or grants, where businesses would agree to accept communication in the Irish language (without preventing them using other languages too) from customers and/or employees.

Would you support such a scheme? I would personally speak some Irish for my shopping if there was a sign outside saying "Irish language accepted here". I think more would too.
Change the word "zones" in your thread title and OP to "Quarters". There is a Gaeltacht Quarter in West Belfast. Yes I would support more of them, although this subject has been debated at length on this site before over the years and it is, I think, highly doubtful whether one would work in Dublin anytime soon because of the cost which would be associated with it and that the quarter would likely mostly be made up of Irish language promotional organisations and small.
 

fifilawe

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Change the word "zones" in your thread title and OP to "Quarters". There is a Gaeltacht Quarter in West Belfast. Yes I would support more of them, although this subject has been debated at length on this site before over the years and it is, I think, highly doubtful whether one would work in Dublin anytime soon because of the cost which would be associated with it and that the quarter would likely mostly be made up of Irish language promotional organisations and small.
I am afraid that the PC Shitlib retard brigade will be labelling such ideas as "Exclusive, Non-Pc etc........" The hard left would also join in and condemn it as "divisive , non-inclusive ........".It would be still-born after these loons have their say on it.I am all for labhairt na Gaeilge in áit ar bith ag am ar bith cuma cibé chluineann mé , seo í mo thír dhúchais féin agus mo theanga dúchais féin" .Téidís chuig an diabhal muna maith leo.
 
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Dame_Enda

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This idea is called the Gaeltacht
It isn't really. I'm talking about having them within our towns and cities, and not ghettoised together which was one of the mistakes with the Gaeltacht policy. If people knew the staff in a shop/Post Office etc could communicate in Irish, more would choose to use the language. It would also act as an encouragement for other businesses to follow suit.
 

Buchaill Dana

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It isn't really. I'm talking about having them within our towns and cities, and not ghettoised together which was one of the mistakes with the Gaeltacht policy. If people knew the staff in a shop/Post Office etc could communicate in Irish, more would choose to use the language. It would also act as an encouragement for other businesses to follow suit.
So its the Gno scheme CnG do.
 

DJP

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So its the Gno scheme CnG do.
The Gnó means Business scheme? That's Foras na Gaeilge. CnaG have always been non-existent in general when it comes to promoting the Irish language in the business sector. It's a central reason why I don't rate them as pretty much productive in a big way when it comes to promoting the Irish language, outside of Oireachtas na Gaeilge and Seachtain na Gaeilge.
 

Dame_Enda

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The €3000 matching grant in the Gnó scheme should be increased.
 

Buchaill Dana

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The Gnó means Business scheme? That's Foras na Gaeilge. CnaG have always been non-existent in general when it comes to promoting the Irish language in the business sector. It's a central reason why I don't rate them as pretty much productive in a big way when it comes to promoting the Irish language, outside of Oireachtas na Gaeilge and Seachtain na Gaeilge.
Apologies, but the point remains. The Dame hasn't done any homework hrre.
 

DJP

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Gnó Mhaigh Eo is only present in Mayo.
Gaillimh le Gaeilge only work in Galway; Forbairt Feirste only work in Belfast; and Gael-Taca only work in Cork also.

The work that these four organisations have done in the business sectors in their areas's is significant.

There is also Cill Dara le Gaeilge that is particularly active around the Sallins area and that are trying to get funding to cover the county in general more.
 

raetsel

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I am afraid that the PC Shitlib retard brigade will be labelling such ideas as "Exclusive, Non-Pc etc........" The hard left would also join in and condemn it as "divisive , non-inclusive ........".
:rolleyes:
Does that include all the PC Shitlib and hard left retards who are Irish language supporters as well?
 

Breanainn

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I am afraid that the PC Shitlib retard brigade will be labelling such ideas as "Exclusive, Non-Pc etc........" The hard left would also join in and condemn it as "divisive , non-inclusive ........".It would be still-born after these loons have their say on it.I am all for labhairt na Gaeilge in áit ar bith ag am ar bith cuma cibé chluineann mé , seo í mo thír dhúchais féin agus mo theanga dúchais féin" .Téighdís chuig an diabhal muna maith leo.
And what exactly precludes anyone from learning Irish, aside from personal linguistic ability (or lack of same)?
 

Breanainn

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As for the idea, any revival should certainly be community-based - between Gaelscoileanna, GAA clubs and ciorcail comhrá, along with Chambers of Commerce, most towns have the necessary infrastructure to boost the speaking of Irish, if they can formulate a joined-up plan.
 

Dearghoul

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Feb 8, 2013
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I think a lot of us know at least some Irish, but are embarassed to use it in public places because of lingering post-colonial shaming which associated it with poverty and the Famine. But I think in spite of this, more would use it if the government set up designated Irish language "zones", supported by tax incentives or grants, where businesses would agree to accept communication in the Irish language (without preventing them using other languages too) from customers and/or employees.

Would you support such a scheme? I would personally speak some Irish for my shopping if there was a sign outside saying "Irish language accepted here". I think more would too.
How would you train staff?
 

redneck

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May 5, 2007
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I lived in London for a while. There was a Welsh chapel and social centre near by. The Welsh speakers went to service on Sunday, there was a bar and social centre with it. So they had their church service, and then went to the bar after to socialise in Welsh.
 


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