• Due to a glitch in the old vBulletin software, some users were "banned" when they tried to change their passwords at the end of February. This does not apply after the site was converted to Xenforo. If you were affected by this, please us viua the Contact us link in the footer.

Irish not allowed to own hounds?


Mossy Heneberry

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 10, 2009
Messages
3,841
If you watch the video below at it says at 00:40 that Irish people were prevented from owning hounds, so we turned to breeding terriers instead.

I've never heard of this law before and doing some research via google has turned up nothing.

Does anyone know anything about this law and why it was brought in in the first place?

Dogs 101 Soft coated wheaten terrier - YouTube
 


mangaire1

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 10, 2011
Messages
9,330
If you watch the video below at it says at 00:40 that Irish people were prevented from owning hounds, so we turned to breeding terriers instead.

I've never heard of this law before and doing some research via google has turned up nothing.

Does anyone know anything about this law and why it was brought in in the first place?

Dogs 101 Soft coated wheaten terrier - YouTube
judging by the amount of dog sh*t, on the pavements around here,
me thinks that too many Irish people are allowed to own hounds.
 

EoinMag

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 4, 2010
Messages
4,950
Makes sense, don't allow them to own hunting dogs but allow them to own ratting dogs, as befits ones station....
 

florin

Well-known member
Joined
May 17, 2008
Messages
1,366
Under Penal Law a Catholic man couldn't own an animal worth over £5, and if an Anglican offered to pay £5 they had to sell it.

In 1704 the British enacted a Penal Code on the Irish which lasted for more than a century. It was done in an attempt to crush the Irish Catholic population. It is important to the development of the Irish Wheaten Terrier because the Catholics were not allowed to own an animal valued at more than £5. They needed a dog that would not draw the attention of the English, who would have been permitted to make payment of £5 to confiscate the animal for themselves. Spectacular looking dogs, like the Irish Wolfdog, could be “bought” for £5 and kept by the English or sent as gifts to other countries. The moderate local terrier rarely got a second look. Wheatens had to perform the function of any dog and appear to be of very little value. Of course the value to the farmer was considerable! This may have been the reason why it is stressed to this day that the Irish Wheaten Terrier be a moderate dog with no exaggerated points. Moderation is part of the tradition that kept the wheaten terrier a beloved companion to the Irish people.
 

MrMee

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 3, 2010
Messages
867
It might be reference to something like King Canute's Forest Law from 1014, where only the nobility were allowed to own sighthounds (that would be greyhounds, wolfhounds, deerhounds and similar dogs). It could be something similar was attempted here, similar to the Statues of Kilkenny or within the Penal Laws. I know within the Penal Laws an Irish person was not allowed to own a horse worth more than £5, for example.
 

Suttree

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 7, 2011
Messages
1,702
I know Irish Wolfhounds were too closely associated with the Ascendancy and landlord class, and the Kerry Blue was promoted as the proper republican dog of choice.
 

Socratus O' Pericles

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 12, 2009
Messages
33,584
Terriers make excellent hunting dogs.
I saw a programme on NG about pomeranians in the wild about 30 of the little heuers took down a deer and gobbled him up.

They are also called spitz apparently.
 

former wesleyan

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 29, 2009
Messages
25,876
The dog fell into disuse, that's all. No wolves = no hunting = no hunting dogs. A few families kept them for old times sake as it were, but there was never an effort to standardise or revive the breed till the 19th century.
 

Seanie Lemass

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 26, 2010
Messages
20,128
Terriers were bred for hunting smaller animals at which they are very efficient. So they would have been the choice for practical purposes as opposed to the hunting packs of hounds for 'leisure' hunting of foxes and deer.

My favourite terriers the Westies were bred in Scotland to hunt but were also kept by farmers to catch rats and rabbits. At which they are still excellent!
 

Levellers

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 30, 2011
Messages
14,091
I know Irish Wolfhounds were too closely associated with the Ascendancy and landlord class, and the Kerry Blue was promoted as the proper republican dog of choice.
A friend of mine owned a Kerry Blue. He couldn't let it near another dog [or animal for that matter] as it would attack them.
 

Suttree

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 7, 2011
Messages
1,702
A friend of mine owned a Kerry Blue. He couldn't let it near another dog [or animal for that matter] as it would attack them.
Not really familiar with them; are they known to have a bad temperament (as much as you can say that about any breed)?

A few years back in college we had a paintball outing that included some fairly basic grub for dinner, one of the staff had an enormous wolfhound who was showing interest in my food. He seemed extremely gentle, but he got the burger while I went hungry!
 

Seanie Lemass

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 26, 2010
Messages
20,128
A friend of mine owned a Kerry Blue. He couldn't let it near another dog [or animal for that matter] as it would attack them.

They are aggressive towards other animals, as are most terriers, but are good with people. My uncle had one and my little one used drag the poor animal around when she was small with never a complaint from the poor doggie!
 

b.a. baracus

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 3, 2009
Messages
2,230
They are aggressive towards other animals, as are most terriers, but are good with people. My uncle had one and my little one used drag the poor animal around when she was small with never a complaint from the poor doggie!
Neighbour of mine had 2 Kerry Blues. Bloody vicious things with anybody except their male owner. Even his wife was terrified of going into the back garden when the husband was not about. She used to, no joking, launch their food out an upstairs bedroom window into the back garden if the husband was not around to feed them. They did not appear to be mistreated by the male owner from what I saw.

Irish wolfhounds are lovely dogs but you would need a second income to feed them. They are also quite short lived - at 8 or 9 a Wolfhound is getting to the end of their life. Too much inbreeding must be a contributory factor.

Give me a wolfhound any day.
 

Mackers

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 24, 2011
Messages
5,526


This is Norman the Greyhound that some scum of the earth cut off his ears in order not to be found as it's owner. He was taken in and is on the mend as you will see in the next photo.
P.S. sorry for the flash mark



See BBC NI website for more news on his case. Hopefully the bas tards that did this will be got.
 

Ren84

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 14, 2011
Messages
49,992
I would like to see Army parades with Irish Wolfhounds.

That would be a good way to revive the breed in Ireland.

Just a thought.
The Irish Wolfhound is the mascot of the Royal "Irish" Regiment so it would be nice to see the true army of Ireland the Defence Forces reclaiming the animal as its own.

Slightly off topic but I feel the Irish Government needs to start protesting at foreign armies using 'Irish' in their titles. But that's for another thread.
 

New Threads

Popular Threads

Most Replies

Top